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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

I have a Bosch GOF1300ce which is a fine machine. But somehow it has problem keeping speed when routing. Even with a 8mm straight router bit and hardly pressing the machine forward, it struggles.

Does anyone know what the problem is? I mean, with 1300w, there is more than enough power to keep even bigger router bits going and holding the speed.
I checked a while ago- the brushes are ok. I'm very tempted to think the fault is within the control unit that controls speed.

Thanks in advance
 

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Welcome to the Forum...

I believe you are correct...speed control unit.

You might try taking it apart to make sure the sensor is clean of any fine sawdust and that all the wires are connected properly and not loose...

The sensor typically sits above the rear of the shaft and can be removed easily with screws. The sensor looks at the shaft spin to determine its speed.
 

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look to the brushes...
 

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It may be what Nick said but a little die grinder of mine quit recently after doing something similar and it looked like a chunk had broken off one brush and caused the other to get chewed up in the aftermath. The speed control may also be faulty but I’ll have to replace the brushes first to find out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I actually found out what causes this problem. I ordered a new speed control, replaced the old one, and there were no difference at all. The old was not malfunctioning. What causes this is when I use a straight router bit, it's the debris that clogs up in its path. I tried a completly different bit; no sign of power loss while routing.
 

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If that's true Bj then up cut spiral bits would probably be your best choice. If I can I like to make a small groove with my table saw and then finish with the router. The saw groove makes a big difference as it gives some of the chips an escape path and it lets air get to the bit which keeps it much cooler.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
What diameter bit were you using and how deep of a cut?
A simple straight bit 8mm, from a set distributed by Bosch I bought many years ago, on full speed cutting in oak! That said, I dont think its a proper Bosch quality, but something cheap chintoc, and maybe thats why it struggles - the bit is not sharp as required?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
If that's true Bj then up cut spiral bits would probably be your best choice. If I can I like to make a small groove with my table saw and then finish with the router. The saw groove makes a big difference as it gives some of the chips an escape path and it lets air get to the bit which keeps it much cooler.
Sounds like a very good idea to premake a path with a circular saw. I will try that next time ig same problem occurs with different dimensions!
 

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A simple straight bit 8mm, from a set distributed by Bosch I bought many years ago, on full speed cutting in oak! That said, I dont think its a proper Bosch quality, but something cheap chintoc, and maybe thats why it struggles - the bit is not sharp as required?

It could be you are trying to make to deep of a cut in single pass. Anything that is cutting wood needs an opportunity to clear way the chips and dust that are created. With smaller bits, the spacing between cutters gets tighter, causing them to get clogged easily. Making a cut too quickly or too much material being removed can result in the cutter getting clogged causing even the most powerful router to have issues, or even resulting in a broken bit. With my 1/4" (~6mm) spiral bit I try to make each pass at 1/8" (~3mm) or 3/16" (~5mm).
 
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