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Discussion Starter #1
I have a Bosch 1613EVS. The fine adjustment knob is very "sticky". I've tried oiling the threaded shaft under the adjustment knob, but it still requires great force to turn the knob, in either direction. Can't figure out how to get inside the mechanism to diagnose further. The exploded view available on line is little help. Any ideas how to fix or dig deeper? Thx
 

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Hey, TDB; welcome!
Oil was probably a contributing factor. What ever compacted dust was in there has likely turned to gundge.
You need to flush it through/out. My first choice, before the oil was added, would have been Mineral spirits (paint thinner) but now I'd switch to Isopropyl alcohol (Rubbing Alcohol) and a lot of it!
Taking it apart is really the most certain way of doing it properly...call Bosch Customer Service. They're very helpful.
https://www.manualslib.com/manual/476013/Bosch-1613evs.html?page=8#manual
 

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and use dry lube when you reassemble...
 
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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks. I think I will contact Bosch to find out how to get in there. The oil I've put in hasn't leaked out anywhere so I'm concerned any "flushing" agent will also have a tough time getting out - and probably take a long time in the process. So, my plan would be to open it up, clean, dry, and then use dry lube. Let's see what Bosch says....
 

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in conclusion....

So, I talked with Bosch "customer service". They were worthless. But, I did manage to then get myself transferred to "technical service" where the guy knew what he was talking about. Anyway, for any others who may need to get into the guts of their router...

First, take the motor housing off the top of the router and release the coil springs holding the brushes and retract the brushes. This is needed to allow the motor body to slide out of the housing and to reinsert it later. Next remove 4 screws from the base of the router body. You need a very short screwdriver or ratchet with phillips bit to get to these. Lock the plunge base lever. Next remove the adjustment knob and pry off the lock washer that is holding a couple of washers and a spring washer. I used a flat blade and pried it off. Now the motor housing can be lifted off the plunge base, but only after the plunge lock lever has been released. Caution, when you release the lock lever there is a long compressed spring inside the handle on that side of the router that will push the housing away from the base. The spring is about 10" long and will want to get away from you. At this point you can remove the adjustment knob shaft and mechanism from the housing and clean it.

The issue, for me, was that the screw mechanism was clogged with some fine wood dust mixed with oil. The mechanism is a combination of a cast aluminum male threaded piece that screws into a nylon female piece and it is not made to shed any stuff that might get in there. For mine, there was only a few threads that had material on them. I wiped them clean with a wire brush and the mechanism then worked fine. I don't think dry lube would help the situation because when dirt gets in there, these threads are gonna seize up, lube or not.
 

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Hello and welcome. Glad you got it fixed. Please put your first name where it says "NA". We try to be friendly here. Stick around and maybe you can have some fun talking woodworking. :smile:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks Roy, will do. I'm Tom, btw. I'm off now to fix some other tools that have "sticky" issues. I've probably used oil inappropriately in several areas where I should have just bit the bullet, disassembled, then cleaned. Regards
 

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Hey, TDB; welcome!
...turned to gundge.
You need to flush it... ]

Out of curiosity I looked for a proper definition of "gundge"... only because "gundge" and "flush" were used closely together in your response. This of course led me to verify whether I was getting the right image or not...

:surprise:
 

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Out of curiosity I looked for a proper definition of "gundge"... only because "gundge" and "flush" were used closely together in your response. This of course led me to verify whether I was getting the right image or not...

:surprise:
keep in mind he's north of north...
 

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in conclusion....

So, I talked with Bosch "customer service". They were worthless. But, I did manage to then get myself transferred to "technical service" where the guy knew what he was talking about. Anyway, for any others who may need to get into the guts of their router...

First, take the motor housing off the top of the router and release the coil springs holding the brushes and retract the brushes. This is needed to allow the motor body to slide out of the housing and to reinsert it later. Next remove 4 screws from the base of the router body. You need a very short screwdriver or ratchet with phillips bit to get to these. Lock the plunge base lever. Next remove the adjustment knob and pry off the lock washer that is holding a couple of washers and a spring washer. I used a flat blade and pried it off. Now the motor housing can be lifted off the plunge base, but only after the plunge lock lever has been released. Caution, when you release the lock lever there is a long compressed spring inside the handle on that side of the router that will push the housing away from the base. The spring is about 10" long and will want to get away from you. At this point you can remove the adjustment knob shaft and mechanism from the housing and clean it.

The issue, for me, was that the screw mechanism was clogged with some fine wood dust mixed with oil. The mechanism is a combination of a cast aluminum male threaded piece that screws into a nylon female piece and it is not made to shed any stuff that might get in there. For mine, there was only a few threads that had material on them. I wiped them clean with a wire brush and the mechanism then worked fine. I don't think dry lube would help the situation because when dirt gets in there, these threads are gonna seize up, lube or not.

Please give this man a star! This is exactly what I needed to fix my 1613EVS router with a stuck height adjustment.

Other notes -
1) It is not necessary to remove any of the screws on the handles.
2) The retainer clip on the top of the router, underneath the adjustment knob, can be pried up a little at a time with two screwdrivers, sort of "walking" the clip up the shaft.
3) If you're lucky enough for your router to be stuck in the up position, a stubby Phillips screwdriver with a 1" shaft length can be used to remove the 4 screws at the base of the router body
4) When you pull the motor housing off, watch out for a ball bearing that sits atop a plastic piece that helps keep the long spring straight
5) When reassembling, be sure that the plunge lever makes good solid contact with the internal rod. It is friction only that keeps the plunge lever (and the router height) in place.
6) The "spare parts drawing" is also useful
 

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Please give this man a star! This is exactly what I needed to fix my 1613EVS router with a stuck height adjustment.

Other notes -
1) It is not necessary to remove any of the screws on the handles.
2) The retainer clip on the top of the router, underneath the adjustment knob, can be pried up a little at a time with two screwdrivers, sort of "walking" the clip up the shaft.
3) If you're lucky enough for your router to be stuck in the up position, a stubby Phillips screwdriver with a 1" shaft length can be used to remove the 4 screws at the base of the router body
4) When you pull the motor housing off, watch out for a ball bearing that sits atop a plastic piece that helps keep the long spring straight
5) When reassembling, be sure that the plunge lever makes good solid contact with the internal rod. It is friction only that keeps the plunge lever (and the router height) in place.
6) The "spare parts drawing" is also useful
Helpful information.
 
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