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So Ive watched a few videos and it looks like when making a cut and then you need to make a sharp turn like 90 degrees, people are just turning the wood fast. When I do this it breaks the blade. I'm sure its something simple, but since I live in a remote country setting, I don't have access to other scroller's. Any help would be appreciated....


Mike
 

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The sharpest radius you can turn is determined by the width of your saw kerf and the width (front to back) of your blade. Some scroll saw blades can cut tighter circles than others. A few can cut in any direction because they are basically a rod with teeth all around. Do some research on the various blades available for your saw.
 

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So Ive watched a few videos and it looks like when making a cut and then you need to make a sharp turn like 90 degrees, people are just turning the wood fast. When I do this it breaks the blade. I'm sure its something simple, but since I live in a remote country setting, I don't have access to other scroller's. Any help would be appreciated....


Mike
Welcome to the forum, Mike. I'm making an assumption that you are using a scroll saw. I you are breaking the blades there could be a couple of reasons. The blade may not have the proper tension applied or you may be stopping the material when making the turn. This will bind the blade. You have to keep the material moving.

I can offer some alternatives if you tell me exactly what you are trying to do and how you are doing it.

Bill
 

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what blade are using in what saw and are you in orbit cut????
 

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Mike, the proper technique for turning at right angles on a scroll saw, is try to pivot the work piece on the back of the blade - you do this by pausing your cut, then applying slight sideways pressure on the blade, and smoothly turning the wood while transferring and keeping the pressure on the back of the blade. Then resume cutting forward in the new direction. If you are breaking blades while doing this, it sounds like you are trying to turn too fast. Some can do this movement very quickly, but that's just practice.
Just pause at the turn point, and by pivoting on the back of the blade, you will not be cutting anything but the tiny circle made by the blade width. Then resume cutting in the new direction. Eventually it will become one fluid movement, but concentrate first on doing 3 distinct movements, (pause, pivot, cut) without rushing it.
 

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Mike, the proper technique for turning at right angles on a scroll saw, is try to pivot the work piece on the back of the blade - you do this by pausing your cut, then applying slight sideways pressure on the blade, and smoothly turning the wood while transferring and keeping the pressure on the back of the blade. Then resume cutting forward in the new direction. If you are breaking blades while doing this, it sounds like you are trying to turn too fast. Some can do this movement very quickly, but that's just practice.
Just pause at the turn point, and by pivoting on the back of the blade, you will not be cutting anything but the tiny circle made by the blade width. Then resume cutting in the new direction. Eventually it will become one fluid movement, but concentrate first on doing 3 distinct movements, (pause, pivot, cut) without rushing it.
Well said, Rob.

Glad you published the Olson blade chart most of the answers that new scrollers have are answered by that chart and this one may, also, help.
 

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The no fail chart is the one I have in my shop, I would have posted that but could not find where it was in the internet wasteland. I have it bookmarked now, Thanks
 

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@picardn

Has any of this helped? If not, let us know so we can provide the right advice.
 

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Whenever I am about to make scrollsaw cuts with tight corners, I drill holes "just large enough" for the particular blade to rotate freely within. My son-in-law teaches mentally-challenged middle schoolers - so he and I are constantly making puzzles for them to use. We use a variety of wood scraps and always do the cutting on a scrollsaw. With really narrow blades, there is only a need for tiny diameter holes. I've seen guys that can make some really tight turns as y'all have mentioned, but personally; I am a bit of a blade-breaker!

Otis Guillebeau from Auburn, Georgia
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for all the help guys. I have an Excalibur saw and am trying different blades. So far the pause, pivot and cut method seems to be working. Well less blade breakage.. lol... I know its a learning experience. Just scares the heck out of me when that blade snaps.... I am going to try different Olsen blades and maybe the spiral blades. I purchased and assortment to try. Thanks for posting the blade chart....

Mike
 

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The size of the blade is a huge factor. If you are trying to pivot 90 degrees with a #7 blade, chances are you will snap it. A #2 blade should pivot no problem. The thickness of the wood is a big factor as well. The thinner the wood, the easier on the blade it will be.
 
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