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Hello, guys.
Recently I was working in my garage sanding several wooden pieces for a project when a sandbelt was broken. Right away I took a replacement from the shelf but this broke almost immediately. I decided to repair both sandbelts using two different glues. The things are not available here lastly.
The first one was repaired wit CA glue but the results were a disappointment.
I turned to contac cement glue to repair the second piece. This time I used a piece of canvas as backup. Although the sandbelt worked to finish the job I think that something was wrong. This method was the better but not the best. The sandbelt is elongated more than the capacity my chinese machine is able to adjust for.
Any suggestion?
 

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Any suggestion?
It's not worth the effort... IMHO... re-purpose them instead...
There's volumes here on this subject... and the upshot is... no...

But if you must...
First, peel the remaining factory tape off the belt splice. Cut a piece of cloth bias tape (wide single-fold type, available at fabric stores) about 2″ longer than the width of the belt. Lay one end of the belt, grit-side down, on the bench; then apply cyanoacrylate glue to the end of the belt. Lay half of the bias tape’s width on the glue, place waxed paper over the tape, and use a weight to press down on it for about 30 seconds, or until the glue sets. Wrap the belt around and repeat the gluing process to reconnect the ends of the belt. Trim off the excess tape, and the belt’s ready to use... For a short while....
the manufacturer uses a heat press (vulcanization process) set, kevlar tape/glue and the belts have a one year shelf life... The seams deteriate...
AccuBind Pro Binding Strips will work the best for repairs but you need a 250 - 300 degree heated press (carpet seaming iron snd s lot off pressure) to apply them correctly and the price of them will hurt your brain...
 

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The belts themselves also deteriorate. I've had chunks break off old ones. They aren't even good for sanding blocks when they get to that condition.
 
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Alexis - recently I was doing a lot of belt sander work and had purchased some belts from a Canadian hardware store chain - of the pack of 5 belts, 2 broke almost immediately. I chalked it up to cheap, poorly made belts.

However, I there is an arrow on the inside of the belts that indicates which way they should turn - did you check this?
 

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Old belts several years old and older, and belts run the wrong direction will do this. When I first got a belt sander I stocked up on about 20 belts of different grits for it. I've learned the hard way not to do this. I now will only keep a few in the shop and buy just what I expect to need for the coming project when I need them. I've tried to glue them back together, but haven't found a glue that works well. I don't even bother trying any more.

Charley
 

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Old belts several years old and older, and belts run the wrong direction will do this. When I first got a belt sander I stocked up on about 20 belts of different grits for it. I've learned the hard way not to do this. I now will only keep a few in the shop and buy just what I expect to need for the coming project when I need them. I've tried to glue them back together, but haven't found a glue that works well. I don't even bother trying any more.

Charley
Exactly the same here :crying:
 

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Old belts several years old and older, and belts run the wrong direction will do this. When I first got a belt sander I stocked up on about 20 belts of different grits for it. I've learned the hard way not to do this. I now will only keep a few in the shop and buy just what I expect to need for the coming project when I need them. I've tried to glue them back together, but haven't found a glue that works well. I don't even bother trying any more.

Charley
exactly...
 

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It's a shame as I bought a bunch of spares for my GI vertical sander not knowing there's a shelf life . Life lesson learned I guess

Btw , Welcome to the forum DonaHarris
 

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I've repaired belts that have lasted long enough to make it worth while, but have also made new belts. Almost every diy and tool shop here sells belt sanding stock by the metre, in varying widths.
The secret of a good join is to file off ALL the grit both both ends of the diagonal cut, for as much as your overlap is going to be. I overlap about 20mm (3/4"). With the overlap being ONLY backing to backing the glue can hold. If you have left grit in there the surface area isnt enough for the glue.

Also, you need to pay attention to the arrows. you need the join to move in such a direction that the outside edge is going backwards. This way the wood rides over it. If the join is edge forwards, the repeated shock of the wood hitting it will tear it apart in seconds. Also if you have made the join too thick with backing tape the vibrations against the wood will severely shorten the life.

I try not to have to do this, but my machine is an import and the nearest factory made belts are 2000 miles away, with a 10 day delivery time, so sometimes my demand exceeds my supply.
 

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I have never had a problem, I buy in quantities and never had one fail no matter how old, some are 10 years old. I use Kingspore or Nortons.
Herb
 

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I think you all missed the problem. Alexis has difficulty buying new belts in Venezuela, another sign of the problems there, so buying new isn't a real option, vis a vie he needs to repair them.
@sunnybob Bob, what glue did you use?
 
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