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I am thinking of building a shop, and was looking for suggestions of how much room I need, the best layout, electricity, or any advice you might have on setting up a shop. I have alot of my tools listed on my profile to give you an idea of what I have. There is a PSI dust collection system that I am not sure how to set up either. My slide compound saw is mounted to a 10 foot table with built in rulers, and there is a 6 foot table for a table saw (I think.. it has steel plates on it and rulers) with the Exact-I-Rip attached to it. Or could that be a router table? All other bigger tools are attached to stands as well if that is an option for them. Plus there is a big blue filter that I am not sure how to hook it up.

Thanks ahead for any tips you might have! I am new to this, and figured I have been given this gift of tools, I should do something with them!

Adrienne
 

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You need as big a building as you can get. No matter the size, you will fill it up. On the other side, whatever the size, you will make do.
Kind of like computer advice, get the fastest and the most memory you can afford.
With shops it would be, get the most space you can afford.

There are many books and magazines that deal with shop layout. Go to the library or book store and spend some time reading and taking notes.

The layout of your shop has a lot to do with what type of woodworking you do, and what machines you use the most, or the least.

I have seen some great shops while going on YouTube looking for other topics, like "dust collection", or "router tables", or "workshops". You can get some great ideas just watching the videos and paying attention to whats in the background.

No matter how well you plan it out, you will likely make several changes after using it for a while.
Good luck, and have fun.
 

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This is similar to those "meaning of life" questions. If you were lucky enough to have just won the PowerBall Lottery, you'd be in a position to design the ultimate dream shop. Reality, however, is that most of us start with the space we have, and make it work . . . somehow.

I'd suggest starting with thinking about what you want to build immediately, and what you're likely to want to build in the future. That will give you an idea of the size of the stock you'll be working with, which, in turn, will help with machine positioning. Remember, you'll need space for the machine itself, plus both in-feed and out-feed space.

Work flow (minimizing distance between the sequence of steps involved in preparing stock) can be a consideration for larger shop areas, but is often a luxury in small shops. If you have enough space, try to plan on having both a "work" bench and an assembly bench. Here again, the size of your projects will influence the size of both benches.

Consider using open space for multiple purposes. For example, a walkway/aisle can also function as out-feed or in-feed space if the machines are placed and oriented correctly.

Make a list of the machines and tools you have, along with their power requirements. Where possible, plan on plugging the larger machines directly into a (properly-wired) wall outlet. For most non-commercial machines, 20 amp, 110v circuits are sufficient. Make sure that lighting is on circuits that are separate from machine/tool circuits. Try to minimize the use of extension cords, particularly with floor machines. And, make sure that extension cords are sized properly for the tools you are using.

Google's SketchUp program (free) can be used for both designing projects and planning your shop layout. There are "models" for various tools and machines already available for free, as well.
 

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As said earlier go as big as Ya can. Metal buildings are a great way to go , I have one that is made into a gameroom Built walls in it just like a house screwed into the metal put outlets every 5' or so then put the blue insuation with 3/4" plywood this was done so if in future it may be my new shop. Ceiling is insulated with bubble wrap and then drop ceiling with 6" insulation on top of that then my freind put me a central unit which works great in there ..Part of this has become my staining and finishin room. Just a idea on what Ya can do ...Good Luck
 

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I am thinking of building a shop, and was looking for suggestions of how much room I need, the best layout, electricity, or any advice you might have on setting up a shop. I have alot of my tools listed on my profile to give you an idea of what I have. There is a PSI dust collection system that I am not sure how to set up either. My slide compound saw is mounted to a 10 foot table with built in rulers, and there is a 6 foot table for a table saw (I think.. it has steel plates on it and rulers) with the Exact-I-Rip attached to it. Or could that be a router table? All other bigger tools are attached to stands as well if that is an option for them. Plus there is a big blue filter that I am not sure how to hook it up.

Thanks ahead for any tips you might have! I am new to this, and figured I have been given this gift of tools, I should do something with them!

Adrienne
You have some pretty nice tools. The blue filter is hung from the ceiling (if it's the one I think it is) and should be controlled by a wall switch. You might also want to wire your dust collection with two 3-way switches so that you can turn it on from different parts of your shop (if it's a stationary install). For all the 110 volt tools just make sure you have enough plug-ins in places where they are likely to be set up. For 220 volt tools you usually need to have a permanent spot in mind, although you can run an extension cord to them too. I do that with my 16" planer. If your dust collector is to be a stationary install then keep in mind where the hoses are going to have to go to avoid tripping hazards.
 

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I would build a 16' X 20' this way you do not waste materials
Gabel roof

Rim Joist: 2 X 10
Floor Joist: 2 X 8
Roof: 2 X 6
Walls: 2 X 4
1/2" dry wall
Blue Jean Insulation
Siding: Rough Tex T1-11 wood siding not OSB
3/4" CDX
2 X 8 Joist Hangers
hurricane ties

Note: If you build this structure off the ground insulate between the floor joist then cover that w/ house wrap then chicken wire.

Use House wrap on the outside walls over top of 3/8" CDX before applying the rough tex T1-11 wood siding.
 

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I am thinking of building a shop, and was looking for suggestions of how much room I need, the best layout, electricity, or any advice you might have on setting up a shop. I have alot of my tools listed on my profile to give you an idea of what I have. There is a PSI dust collection system that I am not sure how to set up either. My slide compound saw is mounted to a 10 foot table with built in rulers, and there is a 6 foot table for a table saw (I think.. it has steel plates on it and rulers) with the Exact-I-Rip attached to it. Or could that be a router table? All other bigger tools are attached to stands as well if that is an option for them. Plus there is a big blue filter that I am not sure how to hook it up.

Thanks ahead for any tips you might have! I am new to this, and figured I have been given this gift of tools, I should do something with them!

Adrienne
Fine woodworking has a nice shop planner and good information

finewoodworking.com/workshop-planner
 
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