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Just starting out with a router and I will be using templates. I will be making my own templates so I can make them the size I want to with either using bushings or using bits with bearings.
I"m wondering what you all prefer to use if you have the choice? I have read some ppl dont like the bearing bits because they (bearings) end up failing and ruining thier work. Please let me know what you think to help me decide what route to go.

Thanks
 

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Hi


Just my 2 cents, I like the bearing on the bits they are always dead on unlike the guides that you must off set them to use them right, I always check the bearing b/4 I use them ,the little screws will come free easy BUT sometimes you can't find the bit with a bearing on it so the guides come into play at that point I use the 1 1/2" guides most of the time that gives me bit more room for the bit inside the guide plus more room for the chips to come out, but I also use the off set rings to use the same template for many types of jobs...

You may say what are Off Set rings you can see them in my uploads..
http://www.routerforums.com/attachments/tools-woodworking/47385d1321196873-frugal-woodworking-6965.jpg
http://www.routerforums.com/attachments/tools-woodworking/47386d1321201615-frugal-woodworking-6986.jpg

Just a side note****so many have errors with the dovetail jigs that's because they use the guides ,if they use the bearing on the bit most of the errors will not come into play or to say the joints will be cut right on the button,,the error with the guides they MUST be dead on with the shank of the dovetail bit and most don't take the time to do that, it just takes a little bit off center and the joints will not fit right..:(


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Just starting out with a router and I will be using templates. I will be making my own templates so I can make them the size I want to with either using bushings or using bits with bearings.
I"m wondering what you all prefer to use if you have the choice? I have read some ppl dont like the bearing bits because they (bearings) end up failing and ruining thier work. Please let me know what you think to help me decide what route to go.

Thanks
 

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Hi, and welcome to our little corner of the 'net.

As for bushings or bearings, it all depends on what you're doing. Bearings can certainly fail, but it doesn't happen that often. You just have to periodically clean them so they don't seize up. Most, not all, template routing is done with guide bushings.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I'm really wanting to go with the bearing bits. I will be making some guitar templates. When I use them , I will drill out most of the wood (on the guitar) with a drill bit and then router out the rest to get a nice clean cut.
 

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Im just getting used to using the bushings but on my current project I used both. Following a Southwest pattern with a bearing bit halfway thru the stock I removed the template ,added a bushing with the same radius and a straight bit to cut all the way
thru. leaving a "shadow" image. both seemed to work fine for me:)

.I do have some questions on how I did what I did but I'll start my own post.
 

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The beauty of template guides is that by changing sizes and/or bit size on a project a very large variety of off-sets can be created. A whole new range of projects can be designed.
 

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Another point worth mentioning is when you use a template and guide bushing you only need one bit. Depending on the project you might need both a top bearing bit and a bottom bearing bit. Using a bit with a guide bushing only requires changing the depth of your cut. Bearing guided bits are at fixed positions so you would have to shim or adjust your template. You can't plunge cut with bearing guided bits. If you are using bearing guided bits with soft wood the bearing often leaves a mark along its path which may require light sanding. Bearing guided bits are very useful for edge trimming but for internal/plunge work not the best choice. The bottom line is you will most likely end up needing both.
 

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I am just learning about template routing and guide bushings as well. I have to admit, I get confused about this easily and have probably shied away from learning more. I currently use bearing guides bits with success but I know next to nothing about guide bushing and template routing....is there a suggested thread on this forum that would be helpful for me to study in that regard?

Thank you
 

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Tom, since you asked there will be.
 

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Thank you so much Bob. I have gotten quite an education on this forum in a very short period of time. You all are very gracious with your time, patience and assistance. This is so helpful.

Based on what I am reading, would it be a good rule of thumb for me to say that taking half the OD of a given guide will give you the distance from the template being used to the center of the bit? That being the case would it then be a matter of lining up the center of the bit with the centerline of the cut to be made?

I should have paid more attention in math class 100 years ago....:unsure:
 

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HI Tom

I just hate charts and I don't like doing the math, and I'm bit lazy what I do is I use the bit OD and the guide OD and that's gets me in the ball park.. :)


===

Thank you so much Bob. I have gotten quite an education on this forum in a very short period of time. You all are very gracious with your time, patience and assistance. This is so helpful.

Based on what I am reading, would it be a good rule of thumb for me to say that taking half the OD of a given guide will give you the distance from the template being used to the center of the bit? That being the case would it then be a matter of lining up the center of the bit with the centerline of the cut to be made?

I should have paid more attention in math class 100 years ago....:unsure:
 

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Just starting out with a router and I will be using templates. I will be making my own templates so I can make them the size I want to with either using bushings or using bits with bearings.
I"m wondering what you all prefer to use if you have the choice? I have read some ppl dont like the bearing bits because they (bearings) end up failing and ruining thier work. Please let me know what you think to help me decide what route to go.

Thanks
Perhaps this link may be of some help.

http://www.routerforums.com/general-routing/25156-series-routing-tutorials-beginners-4.html
 

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For me it's not a question of "either/or" but one of which is best for the application. Top bearing (shank mounted) bits require a somewhat delicate balance between template thickness, depth of cut requirement, cutting length of the bit and whether the cut is completely internal to the workpiece. Bushings entail a different set considerations but I find them somewhat more flexible.
 

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I'd say there are bearings and there are bearings...... What I mean to say is that I've found a great variation in the quality and durability of bearings from the best ones (on "industrial" grade cutters) to the worst (in no-name Chinese sets). I generally do most of my routing with bearing guided bits because it's a lot quicker to set them up that making up templates - but then most of my templates are one shot items made quickly and not for re-use. I've also found problems with smaller bearings. Out of preference I generally go for the largest diameter cutter I can find for straight template work - a 3/4in diameter template trim bit bearing will last longer than a 1/2in diameter trimmer bit bearing which in tiurn will last 3 to 4 times as long as a 1/4in diameter one in my experience. The larger diameter bearing is also much less likely to bounce, chatter or dig into a relatively soft template (I use MDF a lot) as well as cutting a lot more cleanly

Regards

Phil
 
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