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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Yesterday I was trying to familiarize myself with my newly installed router and router table.
I used a round over bit on a left over piece of wood and that went OK
I would like to add a sacrificial board to my Incra 1000SD miter gauge and I would like that to have a T-Track installed on it for the area that is not in hitting the table saw blade
So I reused the same piece of wood and a straight bit set to the proper depth to try to cut a channel.
I did not realize that with the piece of wood sitting on top of the bit the dust won't be sucked in by the dust collection system that I have attached to the fence's dust collector port.
Is this an improper use case for the router table? I did this operation before for a cross cut sled that I was building but that was done manually with the router attached to the plunge base. I did not feel extremely in control of my router back then although there was a straight edge I was using. That was my first attempt to use the router. It worked OK but it was quite messy and dusty. Since then I built a dust collection system that I can now attach to the newly installed router table.

My question: Is there the proper way to cut a T-track channel in a table saw/ miter gauge sacrificial fence board ? How should I setup my router table for proper dust collection for this? The dust and debris was flowing/flying out to the left, channeled out by the very slot I was cutting.
I could see some videos where the fence guide workpieces named so in the below picture were pushed toward each other to close the opening for dust collection. That makes sense when you have an enclosure under the router table but my setup does not have that (see the second picture).




 

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I most certainly would use the table if possible for T-Track channels. However, if the material is too large to fit on the table, then I would do it using a good straight edge the exact width of the router base, clamped firmly in place so the bit strikes the workpiece exactly where you want it.

Mark the top of the router with an arrow and keep the mark pointing to the top "rail" of your guide. Don't let it rotate at all or the track may wander because the base may not be perfectly centered on the router. Make multiple passes, no more than 1/8th inch per pass. In 3/4 material, that means 3 passes. Must have a flat bottom, so select a bit that cuts a smooth flat bottom. If you're a perfectionist, make a final pass to exact depth with a mortising bit for a really flat, smooth bottom.

Be sure your bit is close as possible to the width of the T-Track.
 

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For a fully enclosed cut you must use dust extraction from underneath. Incra clean sweep inserts are quite good for this as they have openings for the dust to escape. For a cut like this, I attach my vacum hose directly to the router in the router table, no suction box, and it works quite ok with those inserts.

You can make a few relief passes on the table saw to remove most of the waste before routing the final shape on the router table.
 

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How should I setup my router table for proper dust collection for this? The dust and debris was flowing/flying out to the left, channeled out by the very slot I was cutting.
Easiest way to solve is to get routers with proper built-in dust collection ports so that you can suck off dust from under the table as well as at the fence.
1. Dewalt
2. Triton
Engineering Gas Machine Wrist Optical instrument




Saw Tool Pneumatic tool Machine tool Drill


I use a GMC R2050 which is an identical clone of the Dewalt DW621 and I have almost zero dust under the workpiece nor any dust dropped into router fan.
 

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Either way should work OK. Just take your time to allow for the dust to blow along the T-track slot.
In my simple video on direction of cut, I use that method to cut a slot in a board...
 

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My question: Is there the proper way to cut a T-track channel in a table saw/ miter gauge sacrificial fence board ? How should I setup my router table for proper dust collection for this? The dust and debris was flowing/flying out to the left, channeled out by the very slot I was cutting.
The proper way is to have the channel cut safely and completed as intended. I have cut them with a plunge base and on the table. Both have pro's and con's but both can be done safely and accurately. I googled your router and it looks like it has a dust collection adapter that attaches to the base that would be on the router when under the table? Put/screw that clear plastic piece that has the dust collection port on it to the base and have it connected to a vacuum. that will help with gathering dust near/under the bit while your above table dust collection can collect the dust from above. That will help with dust collection to a degree. One of the con's to the table method is sometimes/often the dust collects in the groove you are cutting. If you use the plunge router method you have to have dust collection at the bit for any hope of not making a dusty mess.
Routers make a lot of dust and sometimes you just take the piece outside, let her rip and go back in the shop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you guys, all good advice
Yes my router came with a dust collector adapter but I thought that would be to be used with the plunge base. Of course I could try to install it under the table.
I also came across a youtube video showing how to build a dust collector box under that aluminium table top.... it does not look very complicated. The design require magnetic mounts and 1/2" plywood. I might aim for that as well. The co clusion is that for narrow boards it can be done either way, on top routing or using the table but in the se one case the dust collection must be done via the router insert opening from underneath. Will try that dust collector adapter that I already have. I will definitely try multiple passes.

It seems that I also need to read about router speeds and wood types .The first attempt burnt some wood/dust ..lowered the speed and I could see wood dust and debriseith natural wood color comming out of the channels and not brownish smelly stuff as before
 

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Thank you guys, all good advice
Yes my router came with a dust collector adapter but I thought that would be to be used with the plunge base. Of course I could try to install it under the table.
I also came across a youtube video showing how to build a dust collector box under that aluminium table top.... it does not look very complicated. The design require magnetic mounts and 1/2" plywood. I might aim for that as well. The co clusion is that for narrow boards it can be done either way, on top routing or using the table but in the se one case the dust collection must be done via the router insert opening from underneath. Will try that dust collector adapter that I already have. I will definitely try multiple passes.

It seems that I also need to read about router speeds and wood types .The first attempt burnt some wood/dust ..lowered the speed and I could see wood dust and debriseith natural wood color comming out of the channels and not brownish smelly stuff as before
Let me tell you the truth and maybe annoy some ignorant fanboys of a certain brand.
Plastic "Dust collector adapters" are afterthought devices and are NOT as good as Dewalt or Triton designs.
I had the Hitachi M12V with a AUD90 dust adapter purchased aftersales and installed under the table. One, it blocked some plunge movement. It has to be taken off if I wanted to use template Guides (AKA Guide Bush) or Guide Bush adapter since the screw holes were already occupied. It was not very effective.at removing dust when under the table. OK only when used portable.
So I bought the GMC R2050 2000W clone of Dewalt DW621. With two hosts connected to a Mini-cyclone sucked by a ShopVAC with HEPA filter, my table routing became extremely clean.
It grieved me that I had to take out my M12V from the table just because of Dust collection "defects". So I altered the base of GMC R2050 2000W to be able to accept the sets of guide bushes I already bought for the Hitachi M12V..

Never enclose the router in a box to remove dust. Routers need fresh air sucked in by its own fan to cool the motor or it will burn up,

The Hitach M12V is very accurate router and I still use it to cut Kitchen bench top and sink holes etc and to make jigs and plane slabs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Never enclose the router in a box to remove dust. Routers need fresh air sucked in by its own fan to cool the motor or it will burn up
Very good point I will reconsider.Probably I will use the adapter that came with it as bad as it is.
 

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Let me tell you the truth and maybe annoy some ignorant fanboys of a certain brand.
Plastic "Dust collector adapters" are afterthought devices and are NOT as good as Dewalt or Triton designs.
I had the Hitachi M12V with a AUD90 dust adapter purchased aftersales and installed under the table. One, it blocked some plunge movement. It has to be taken off if I wanted to use template Guides (AKA Guide Bush) or Guide Bush adapter since the screw holes were already occupied. It was not very effective.at removing dust when under the table. OK only when used portable.
So I bought the GMC R2050 2000W clone of Dewalt DW621. With two hosts connected to a Mini-cyclone sucked by a ShopVAC with HEPA filter, my table routing became extremely clean.
It greaved me that I had to take out my M12V from the table just because of Dust collection "defects". So I altered the base of GMC R2050 2000W to be able to accept the sets of guide bushes I already bought for the Hitachi M12V..

Never enclose the router in a box to remove dust. Routers need fresh air sucked in by its own fan to cool the motor or it will burn up,

The Hitach M12V is very accurate router and I still use it to cut Kitchen bench top and sink holes etc and to make jigs and plane slabs.
Plus 1 on the Triton under the table for dust collection
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
thank you guys but I am not looking for the ultimate routing experience or the best router out there
It is what it is and I have what I have and I need to make use of that
 

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FYI
Why are AFTERTHOUGHT add-on plastic dust chutes very NOT good for under the table?
To allow the big collet nut to pass through, those chutes have BIG center holes. Upside down dust can get into the motor fan holes.

Dewalt, Triton Engineered dust chute ports suck through the router base . BIG DIFFERENCE!

I am not a fanboy of any brand.


If i want a new SCMS, I will only choose the new Makita SCMS series that has the best dust collection design today.
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You don’t need to use The routers DC when you add DC to the router table, unless you aren’t using a alternate DC…
If you enclose the router in a box, the DC will suck away all the air and the router motor will overheat because the router fan cannot get any cool air into the router motor.

Maybe a water-cooled spindle will work in a BOX.
 

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thank you guys but I am not looking for the ultimate routing experience or the best router out there
It is what it is and I have what I have and I need to make use of that
Given that, and the importance of dust collection for your health, you will need some sort of dust collection device, and the best for reasonable money is the 2.5 inch Dust Deputy with a good shop vac. Pix at end. the majority of sawdust will come out through the port behind the fence. The Dust Deputy system I recommend is pretty much based on 2.5 inch hose sizes.

It is even better if you can have a second port attached to a box below the table, enclosing the router. This can be very simple. But be sure the ports are all the right size to fit the hoses you are using. I recommend going with 2.5 inch sizes. This box also needs an air intake of some sort to work properly.

For freehand use, you could probably get away with a smaller hose attached near the workpiece to suck up as much sawdust as possible while cutting. I suppose you might be able to jury rig an attachment to the router. It will be awkward, but workable. You'll need an adapter to go from 2.5 down to about 1.25 inch hose, plus some kind of spout on the suction end of the small hose.

Whatever else you do, get a good dustmask for yourself, preferable one with a filtered air pump to give you positive air pressure under the mask to keep sawdust from entering.

Sawdust, in particular the ultra fine particles, once they get into your lungs, do not come out easily. Lots of carpenters die at early ages from lung conditions from carelessly inhaling sawdust. I have very aggressive sawdust collection and filtration in my shop, but I rarely spend more than a couple of minutes in there without donning at least a surgical style mask. Read the EPA studies of home shop sawdust hazards and you'll understand why I'm so strong on good dust collection

Here's the Dust Deputy setup with a shop vac. The DD cyclone effect spins the sawdust around and almost all of it falls into the bucket, which keeps your Shop Vac filter from being blocked. This is $60. https://www.amazon.com/Anti-Static-Retrofit-Cyclone-Separator-Collapse-Proof/dp/B09W68X4HJ/ref=sr_1_5?crid=3URU5BAN76QCQ&keywords=Super+dust+deputy+2+1/4&qid=1670986091&sprefix=super+dust+deputy+2+1/4,aps,179&sr=8-5&ufe=app_do:amzn1.fos.18ed3cb5-28d5-4975-8bc7-93deae8f9840&th=1

Here is the older, slightly smaller model so you can see how it is set up.
Drinkware Liquid Fluid Wood Audio equipment


You will also need a length of 2.5 inch hose between the tool and input of the cyclone on the side, then a length between the shop vac and the top of the cyclone. This 20 footer is about $38, https://www.amazon.com/Clear-Collection-Collectors-Ports-Vacuums/dp/B01L0FZOQ8/ref=sr_1_4?crid=3URU5BAN76QCQ&keywords=Super+dust+deputy+2+1/4&qid=1670986535&sprefix=super+dust+deputy+2+1/4,aps,179&sr=8-4

Oh yes, and a bucket or barrel of some sort with solid top to mount the DD. Larger capacity is recommended as once it gets half full, it is less effective and your shop vac filter ($15 and up) will fill solid and stop air flow. Some people have repurposed trash barrels. I use fiber drums with steel tops, 30 gallons, but these have gone up in price with shipping on top of that. You just need something that closes tight and has a flt top. Lots of other solutions, but enough is enough,

This is a lot of information, but I hope it will be practical for you, or anyone with any router.
 

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Agreed with Tom.
I have a similar system.

But I also added a Drywall filter + a HEPA Filter to my ShopVAC. The regular filter bag of 5 micron isn't good enough for filtering off fine-dust.

ShopVac has a branch in Hallam, VIC, Australia about 20km from my house
Shop Vac Australia Pty Ltd
That was where I can walk in to buy all the special Filter bags and HEPA filters, hoses, fittings etc. from at FAIR PRICES. Hardware stores usually only sell the ShopVac and 5 micron bags only.
 
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