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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,
I am working on a project that is made of 5/8 inch stock and the 2 blocks (boxes??) would lend themselves to the dado-rabbit joint. (I could of made them from 3/4 using 3/8 bit and fence) but can I make it in 5/8 stock? (I should of planed them down to 1/2 prior to final sizing but I never thought of it at the time.) They are also only 8 inches long so too short to run through thickness planer....(I feel)
If someone can help out with size & type of bit, method etc. would be greatly appreciated.
Have a good day
 

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glassguy1456 said:
Hello,
I am working on a project that is made of 5/8 inch stock and the 2 blocks (boxes??) would lend themselves to the dado-rabbit joint. (I could of made them from 3/4 using 3/8 bit and fence) but can I make it in 5/8 stock? (I should of planed them down to 1/2 prior to final sizing but I never thought of it at the time.) They are also only 8 inches long so too short to run through thickness planer....(I feel)
If someone can help out with size & type of bit, method etc. would be greatly appreciated.
Have a good day
I would leave your material at 5/8 and merely cut 5/16 rabbets & dados using straight bits or whatever could fit.

An adjustable dado jig and 1/4" bit would handle the dados.

Rabbets are easier.

imho...
 

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Hi Guy

Here's a trick I use when I need stock that needs to be 1/2" thick and all I have is short ones. (6" to 8" long ones )

Find some 3/4" MDF ,cut it to 10" wide by 24" long, take the short stock and get the 3M double sided carpet tape out and stick it to the MDF stock (tap it with a rubber hammer to make sure it's down) , but offset it so you don't have any parts line up on ends (offset it )
Because MDF is true all you need to do is run one side in the planner, you can do 3/4" and 5/8" stock at the same time, the more the merry her :) :) but take care if you mix them ,you will need to pull the MDF out by hand until you get them all down to about 5/8" thick.
Make one or two cuts and then check the tape to make sure it's on then do some more until you get it down to size. (small cuts)

This is also a good way to make 1/8" ,5/32" 3/16", 1/4" spline stock.so you have it on hand when you need it and use up the scrap stock around the shop.

Bj :)
 

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Hi Corey

Sure any time LOL, but you know they are just a web page away :) you can't take it with you :)

Grizzly
No Payments for 90 days on purchases over $250 with Bill Me Later

Bj :)
 

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Thanks Bj :) Let me ask you a question... I have been going back and forth on this. The problem is not much space... you have seen my shop! I do mostly small projects... boxes primarily, clock cases ... stuff like that. Which would you buy based on this and you could only get one? Planer or Jointer. Bench Top Models are all I have room for either.

Corey
 

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Hi Corey

That's a hard one ,,,,,the Planer in your case ,Grizzly or the Dewalt or Delta
list of all 3 makes below ▼ I have the Grizzly and it's great for what I do .

http://amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_gw/00...ps&field-keywords=Planer&Go.x=13&Go.y=5&Go=Go
The reviews are good on the Grizzly and the Delta- plus it has free shipping that's a plus,about 240.oo on both.
The real key to a Planer is the Dust Collector Hood,get the chips out so they don't run over and over and they will chip the blades if you don't , I have two sets of old blades and it took me a long time to get that hint down :(.

Just a NOTE *** I got the Grizzly because of the rollers on the top,it's a pain to walk around the machine with the stock under your arm and the rollers on the top will let you roll the stock over the top and send it for one more pass, it's not to bad for short stock but 4ft and longer it's a pain in the butt,it can take 10 or 20 short walks to get it down to the right size and if you are doing a stack well, when your done with your little walk it's break time.


Bj :)
 

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Hi Corey

Well you want a big jointer when you get one (cast iron 4ft long) they are hard to store and have a big foot print ,I have mind on steel wheels they are hvy.suckers and hard to move around but you only have so much wall space and they take 3ft x 4ft.plus.
And the same thing about the chips as the planner, so you must have the vac. hose setup to plug it in the jointer , I have two 10ft ones(hose) I drag all over the shop because I don't want to plum in the pipe for the vac. system because I move stuff all the time in the shop.

Bj :)
 

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Corey, just so you understand there is a big difference between a joiner and a planer. A joiner is designed to create a true flat surface on one side of your wood. You can not do this with a planer. A planer removes material parrallel to the bottom side of the wood and any imperfections are transfered to the top surface. If your board has a slight twist before planing it will have a thinner slight twist afterwards. This is why you see these machines used together.
 

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glassguy1456 said:
Hello,
I am working on a project that is made of 5/8 inch stock and the 2 blocks (boxes??) would lend themselves to the dado-rabbit joint. (I could of made them from 3/4 using 3/8 bit and fence) but can I make it in 5/8 stock? (I should of planed them down to 1/2 prior to final sizing but I never thought of it at the time.) They are also only 8 inches long so too short to run through thickness planer....(I feel)
If someone can help out with size & type of bit, method etc. would be greatly appreciated.
Have a good day
using the 1/4" box joint jig idea 1/4" groove, 1/4" space and 1/4" fence piece. To make a 5/16" jig it is easy enough to do using a 1/2" piece of ply 6" wide and width of your router table.

1st step: find a straight bit that is 5/16" dia. using it put a 5/16" groove 1/4" deep in the center of the 1/2" ply. along the length of the ply.

2nd step: The trick to this jig is the equal distance between the bit to cut the joint, space to accommodate the rabbet part of the joint and the fence. All three of these part need to be 5/16". Drill a hole in your piece of 1/2" material beside the groove and in the center of the length. This is for the router bit.

3rd step: Plane a piece of straight square stock 1/2" wide X length of your groove and 5/16 " thick. Glue this strip into your groove and you have your box jig made for the 5/8" rabbet/dado joint.

Set up your jig on your router table: 5/16 router bit through the hole with 5/16" space between the router bit and the 5/16" fence. Running the first piece face down cut the dado. Flip the piece around and place on the dadoed piece on the fence of the jig and next to the router bit. Next clamp this piece in place. Standing the other piece on end pass it by the router bit cutting the rabbet in the end of the other piece...you now have a dado in one piece and the rabbet on the end of the other corner. The two pieces fit together to make the rabbet/dado joint.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
thanks rick & bob

thanks for your help, off to find a 5/16 bit. Much appreciated!! I Hope you have a good day
Wayne

BobandRick said:
using the 1/4" box joint jig idea 1/4" groove, 1/4" space and 1/4" fence piece. To make a 5/16" jig it is easy enough to do using a 1/2" piece of ply 6" wide and width of your router table.

1st step: find a straight bit that is 5/16" dia. using it put a 5/16" groove 1/4" deep in the center of the 1/2" ply. along the length of the ply.

2nd step: The trick to this jig is the equal distance between the bit to cut the joint, space to accommodate the rabbet part of the joint and the fence. All three of these part need to be 5/16". Drill a hole in your piece of 1/2" material beside the groove and in the center of the length. This is for the router bit.

3rd step: Plane a piece of straight square stock 1/2" wide X length of your groove and 5/16 " thick. Glue this strip into your groove and you have your box jig made for the 5/8" rabbet/dado joint.

Set up your jig on your router table: 5/16 router bit through the hole with 5/16" space between the router bit and the 5/16" fence. Running the first piece face down cut the dado. Flip the piece around and place on the dadoed piece on the fence of the jig and next to the router bit. Next clamp this piece in place. Standing the other piece on end pass it by the router bit cutting the rabbet in the end of the other piece...you now have a dado in one piece and the rabbet on the end of the other corner. The two pieces fit together to make the rabbet/dado joint.
 

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Corey,a jointer and planer really go hand in hand,in as much as if you put a banana shaped piece into the planer you will get a banana out,albeit a thinner banana! The jointer is first used to produce one flat side prior to being put through the planer.Harry
 

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Further thoughts on planer V jointer

I have had further thoughts Corey, I bought my 6" Taiwanese made jointer which is 42" wide, at least twenty years ago and produced a large number of projects in the following years, it was only six years ago that I added the planer and as they say "what you've never had you never miss" BUT, once you have experienced both a jointer AND a planer you will never operate without both.Like most woodworkers I lack space (the more we have the more we seem to need) so I have casters on all machines incl. the dust collector and move things around as required. It is important to note that a dust collection system is essential when using a planer because without one it only takes a minute or two to look like a snow storm has been through the shed. I use a single 4" hose that I simply slip onto the machine being used with reducers where necessary. I hope this info. may be of help in making a decision. Harry
 

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