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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Car boot

What’s it for. It’s a drill. I know it’s a drill, what’s it for. Drilling I ventured. Oh god I know it’s for drilling she almost shouted. Don’t you have fifty drills in the workshop already. No that’s a slight exaggeration I countered, nearer twenty I muttered.

To set the scene for you guys, sometimes in the UK like minded people get up early on Sunday morning car parks where a car boot sale is advertised, very much like our cousins garage sale but all the wares are piled on to a wall papering tables and sold to whoever shows up.

Well last Sunday we ventured to our local one and low and behold there before me looking lost and forlorn was a Hilti TE10 percussion sds drill. It was calling out my name to save it. I could see it had not a hard life just treated badly, very much like my own circumstances.

I asked the price and was given a £15. The reason being it was 110v site drill and no use to the diy’er as we use 240v in the UK. However I had kitted out my workshop in both voltages

I found my good wife and quickly extolled the virtues of owning such a magnificent machine. Which brings me to. What’s it for.

Now at this point I needed time to formalise my reasons for owning a new drill and she knew it with quick fire questions leaving little manoeuvre. Does it have reverse, is it two speed, what’s the percussion rate. God I was screwed.

Desperation set in and I played my only ace card.

You know that hanging flower basket you wanted, yes, well this is the very drill for the job. How so she enquired, why not one you already have.

This is a high level drill. What’s a high level drill she asked. One you can use off a ladder I offered. My other drills are for ground level only. The look on her face told me she wasn’t convinced.

I pushed on, my other drills are double insulated in that they don’t have an earth and they use my body to earth them, that’s why you have to be on the ground, in order to earth them.

So whats the difference with this one she asked, suspicion still echoing in her voice. This one has a three core cable with a built in earth, so if you are up a wooden ladder, say fitting a flower basket for random example, you can still work safely without getting electrocuted, and you don’t want that that to happen to me do you. No she said with a little to much hesitation for my liking.

So if you buy this drill I can get my hanging basket and you won’t get a shock she offered. That’s about it I answered.

The stall holder who had been witness to this husband/wife interaction, just took my money and shook his head, not offering any insight that would affect his sale of the very rare high level drill.

So lads got it home and set about it. Tried it out and it worked but sounded rough, and it wouldn’t release the percussion, ie no normal drill.

After strip down to last nut and bolt, completely cleaned out all lubrications, grease etc and found that it must have had a fall as the lever for engaging the percussion was out of place.

Checked the motor brushes and they were almost new, which made me suspect it had been sold due to lever not engaging.

Well a couple of days later I had it rebuilt and it’s working well and will now have to install a hanging basket with my very special one off drill.

Before I leave you a few words regarding my condition. As you know I was given the honour of a contributor of the month a few months back, but unfortunately succumbed to a wood turning accident which I documented in a past post, which required a stay in hospital and some surgery, which effectively took me out of action for a considerable time.

I am now on the mend and this is my first post I have been able to submit, mainly because the accident affected my hand.

Still got a couple of months therapy to go, but getting there and looking forward to getting back into the forum again.

And my good wife isn’t making her sausage rolls today. She decided on pies, another Scottish delicacy filled with Aberdeen Angus steak and mince.

Life is good again.

Colin
Scotland
 

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The photo of the drill seems to show a drill in exceptional condition. If all it needed was to fix that lever, I think you did very well. Hilti is a very high quality tool here.

My wife's side of the family is from Scotland, and my mother-in-law used to make those pies. They were a real delicacy, and I can't seem to get my wife to make them. I guess I will have to just imagine eating some of them.

Your way of justifying new tools with the wife impresses me, but fortunately I'm not faced with the same problem. She lets me buy any tools that I want, as long as it doesn't affect the family finances or mealtime.

Charley
 

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For 15 Pounds I would have considered posting it across the pond to here. You should feel badly as you practically stole it from it's former owner.
 

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Nice buy Colin! Very, ahhh, inventive with the reason for the purchase. Hope the wife never finds out the truth mate. As you know those Scottish lasses can be quite a handful and downright savage!!! My wife's grandmother was Scottish. She was 5 foot nothing and a terror!!
 

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Must learn that off verbatim, for my next tool purchase......LOL
 
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I wondered where your posts were. Hope the road to recovery is getting easier. Seems your persuasion skills are still sharp. But I have learned an important lesson from you, if all Scottish women are like your wife I don't stand a chance in conversation. She's a sharp one she is.

Keep up the good fight and get better soon.
 

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What? Scottish and she isn't fixing haggis? Does she know the poem that goes with it? There was a video of a golf tournament in Scotland a few years ago. Last year's winner got to choose the dinner menu and it was haggis. A fellow in a kilt served it with a poem, counting the attributes of the dish.
 

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I missed the post about your accident, Colin. Glad to hear from you and that you're doing better. That drill does look like a steal... their drills and bits were well liked when I was working. Quite the plug on there compared to what it would have over here.

Does the missus use a jig to cut those pie lids?
 

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Good to hear from you again Colin- was wondering where you were. Sorry about the injury. Do you have any wise warnings for other dilettante turners like me? I have avoided mishaps thus far, but try to learn from post mortems of my own snafus and those of others.

Those Hilti tools are real workhorses, but the prices around here have been known to precipitate asthma attacks. I looked at a cartridge-powered nail gun a year or so ago, and spent some effort explaining to the salesman that I only wanted to buy the tool, not the manufacturing line that produced it. Good buy. Does it have an SDS-plus chuck, or a conventional keyless chuck?

Like Paul, I noticed the non-standard plug - was that part of your sales pitch to the missus- insulated outdoor plug, shock-proof on the damp lawn while hanging plant holders, that sort of thing?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Hi there
Thanks for your kind words. A few off you guys have commented on the strange plug on the drill. Many years ago many tradesmen etc were getting electrocuted on construction sites, due mainly to the lack of safety legislation. And in our case in the UK there were quite a few deaths due mainly to us utilising 240volts.

So after all our regs came in it was decided to limit work sites to 110volts. Plus the plugs must be a type designed for site use only. When you push them into the socket they are locked in and are totally insulated, and yellow in colour. There are some instances when you can only use 240volts and the same type of plug applies but it is blue in colour. The other advantage to the 110volts is that our site transformers are twin coiled which means the highest shock you can get is 55volts.

So in the UK you have every drill for sale is available two voltages.

Now i have to go now, got a basket to hang

Colin.
 

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Colin,

I can relate to and understand your situation. No my wife isn't Scottish, but Me Mother sure was. Born and raise in Wishaw and my father married her after WWII. If I wanted something new, I always had to justify it to her to get the money for it. I love your creativity about the drill being special, I think my dad must have used that one for sure. Those pies remind me of the past, my mom has been gone since 1992 RIP.
 

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When I lived in Queens, NY, mid 60s, people would congregate outside the plants and sell out of the boot (trunks to us Yanks). Dad was offered a 7 cell flashlight for a buck. My mother was offered a sheared lamb coat with mink collar for $50; $200 retail.
New York City had two sayings- If you couldn't find it in NYC, it didn't exist. If you had enough money and knew the right people, you could get anything.
Glad you are on the mend. You never know what will happen in the next few seconds. My son-in-law fractured a bone in his foot while running. I don't run.
 
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