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I really do enjoy using my card scraper but sharping them can be a pain. I have been using them for maybe a year now and I still have trouble getting a nice burr on them. When I do get a nice burr they are so nice to use. A card scraper can save you time and money plus give you a better surface. Here is a good video (IMO) on card scrapers showing how to sharpen them and how to use them. If you have any good ideas on card scrapers please post them so we all can learn more about them.

 

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Thank you for posting that, Don. I found it very enlightening.
 

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Excellent video. Thanks.
 

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Nice video, explains use as well as sharpening. Was just using one last night to clean up the glue squeeze-out behind the face frame on the cabinet I just glued up - fortunately not too much because it's on the inside of the cabinet. I use mine mostly for cleaning up the joints on face frames, final trimming on edge banding and so forth, and find that it does a nicer job than sandpaper. Tough on the hands though - I have damage to the tendon in the thumb on my left hand (the orthopedist told me it was a condition known as "Gamekeeper's Thumb") which makes using the scraper on larger projects a problem. I just bought the Veritas Scraper Holder Veritas® Scraper Holder - Lee Valley Tools hoping it will help, haven't had a chance to use it yet but planning to give it a try when I flip the cabinet over and work on the face frame. I've had their Jointer Edger as shown in the video for many years and it works just like shown. The Jointer Edger came with a little sheet with pretty comprehensive instructions that I use, but there are a couple of good tips in this video.
 

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Tom, Paul Sellers has shown a method that may work for you. He wraps his fingers around the end of the scraper, and leans the palm of his hand against the back face of the scraper and bows it with his other hand. He leans it slightly and swings it into his work...kinda like a windshield wiper motion. I've tried it and it works!
 

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Nice video, explains use as well as sharpening. Was just using one last night to clean up the glue squeeze-out behind the face frame on the cabinet I just glued up - fortunately not too much because it's on the inside of the cabinet. I use mine mostly for cleaning up the joints on face frames, final trimming on edge banding and so forth, and find that it does a nicer job than sandpaper. Tough on the hands though - I have damage to the tendon in the thumb on my left hand (the orthopedist told me it was a condition known as "Gamekeeper's Thumb") which makes using the scraper on larger projects a problem. I just bought the Veritas Scraper Holder Veritas® Scraper Holder - Lee Valley Tools hoping it will help, haven't had a chance to use it yet but planning to give it a try when I flip the cabinet over and work on the face frame. I've had their Jointer Edger as shown in the video for many years and it works just like shown. The Jointer Edger came with a little sheet with pretty comprehensive instructions that I use, but there are a couple of good tips in this video.

Thanks Tom for the very good post.
 

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I keep 5 or 6 on hand, various sizes and thickness's. One of my very favorite go to tools in the shop. I recall when I first started using em. Putting a hook on was a pain in the butt, however, I liked how they performed well enough that I keep using them. Now, putting a hook on is almost second nature. For you guys who haven't tried them, give them a fair shot and you'll get hooked....pardon the pun :)
 

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One of my favoured is the one Lee Valley calls the schmoo after the L'il Abner character. It's curved and by rotating and angling it you can fit it to many curved profiles which makes it handy for touch ups.
 

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My scrapers are the ones Stew-Mac sells.
They're a bit smaller than normal but man, do they work good. And sharpening them takes 30 seconds.
 

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Thanks for the great video. I have both the Veritas jig shown and their scraper sharpener, both make it easier to create the bur. However, the informaiton about flattening the face is new to me, but sure makes sense. I don't have a grinder and really don't have much use for them, but I think I'm going to pop for one just for this purpose. I suspect I'll find more uses for the grinder once I have one. That coarser edge would be great for getting the finish off recycled wood. Hardwood is getting pretty expensive these days.

I inherited the burnisher from my brother, who used to make prototype furniture and other stuff for a design firm.

I far prefer the feel of a scraped piece over sanding. I'll have to work on my Shmoo and use it on a picture frame. That ought to give it the glassy smoothness I'd really like for certain frames.
 

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Tom, Paul Sellers has shown a method that may work for you. He wraps his fingers around the end of the scraper, and leans the palm of his hand against the back face of the scraper and bows it with his other hand. He leans it slightly and swings it into his work...kinda like a windshield wiper motion. I've tried it and it works!
Thanks Gary,

I'm subscribed to his YouTube channel so will have to take a look for that video when I get a chance. I mostly pull the scraper rather than push, and kind of prefer that way as I can watch the shavings come of the edge and get a feel for how close I'm getting to finished size - one of the things that sold me on the Veritas holder is they say you can use it in either direction. I hold the scraper with the ends in the crease that runs across my palm and bow it with my finger tips and the pad at the bottom of my thumbs To be honest, when putting the finish on edge banding, I'm normally holding the scraper pretty much in one hand since it's such a narrow section, and I can get a feel for tilting the scraper towards the outside very slightly so as not to hit the delicate plywood veneer. I didn't realize it when I bought the Veritas, but it takes a wider scraper than the ones I have so wound up having to buy the wider ones from them and now need to get them sharpened - maybe use the older ones on narrow parts and the holder for wider ones.
 

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Thanks for the great video. I have both the Veritas jig shown and their scraper sharpener, both make it easier to create the bur. However, the informaiton about flattening the face is new to me, but sure makes sense. I don't have a grinder and really don't have much use for them, but I think I'm going to pop for one just for this purpose. I suspect I'll find more uses for the grinder once I have one. That coarser edge would be great for getting the finish off recycled wood. Hardwood is getting pretty expensive these days.

I inherited the burnisher from my brother, who used to make prototype furniture and other stuff for a design firm.

I far prefer the feel of a scraped piece over sanding. I'll have to work on my Shmoo and use it on a picture frame. That ought to give it the glassy smoothness I'd really like for certain frames.
Tom I think you will find a grinder is very handy around the shop. I keep a wire wheel on one side of my grinder at all times as I use the wire wheel more than the grinding wheels. The wire wheel works great to remove a little rust or clean putty knives or things I can't even think about right now. It cleans real well.
 

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I like the finish from scraping better than sanding. I missed the class Woodcraft held as it was the same weekend of the eclipse and I was out of town on the B line. Thanks for the video it gives me more insight into the scraping process.
 

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Tom I think you will find a grinder is very handy around the shop. I keep a wire wheel on one side of my grinder at all times as I use the wire wheel more than the grinding wheels. The wire wheel works great to remove a little rust or clean putty knives or things I can't even think about right now. It cleans real well.
I popped for the slightly better 6 inch Delta with a speed control at Lowes. Now to find a place to place it where I won't have sparks setting the shop aflame. :grin:
 

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I use mine by the shed door where there is not saw dust. I welded some pipe to a wheel for a stand. I then added an old desk lamp so I would have light.
 

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Thanks Gary,

I'm subscribed to his YouTube channel so will have to take a look for that video when I get a chance. I mostly pull the scraper rather than push, and kind of prefer that way as I can watch the shavings come of the edge and get a feel for how close I'm getting to finished size - one of the things that sold me on the Veritas holder is they say you can use it in either direction. I hold the scraper with the ends in the crease that runs across my palm and bow it with my finger tips and the pad at the bottom of my thumbs To be honest, when putting the finish on edge banding, I'm normally holding the scraper pretty much in one hand since it's such a narrow section, and I can get a feel for tilting the scraper towards the outside very slightly so as not to hit the delicate plywood veneer. I didn't realize it when I bought the Veritas, but it takes a wider scraper than the ones I have so wound up having to buy the wider ones from them and now need to get them sharpened - maybe use the older ones on narrow parts and the holder for wider ones.
I used mine for flushing up some edge banding earlier this, cleaning up where my flush trim bit didn't quite get it right. To keep the inside corner of the scraper from scratching the melamine the banding was on I layered 2 or 3 pieces of making taper over it. That tapered the edge slightly downward on the outer edge which made it easy to do with a low risk of a screwup.
 
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