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Discussion Starter #1
I was already to buy the Bosch Bench Router Table (RA1181) when I finally got a copy of "Router Joinery Workshop" by Carol Reed. I really liked her design, and for the first time thought, "I could build that!"

I am surprised I haven't found much about the router table design on this or other wood working forums. I liked the idea of the router mounting directly to the table (3/8" acrylic) and not having an insert. This will be my first router table and I am envisioning using it for small projects (not doors or large panels!).

Any thoughts about this table? Has anyone else made one?

Thanks,
Sam
 

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While I have not seen the table you are referencing, I think 3/8" acrylic is fine for a plate to mount the router to. Remember if to big as for the table top it would reach a point where the weight of the router would cause it to sag. Unless it was well supported around the rest of the top. Using the plate allows easier access to lift the router out of the table for service. A plate also allows for use of different size inserts as to limit the open space around a bit for safety. Just things to think about.
 

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Using a plate has some advantages...

Having a plate on my router table allows me to implement 100% dust collection under the table - total cost for the dust collection "equipment": $7.00. It's a Rubbermaid plastic bin I bought at Target. Made a little hole at the top to get the router's power cord out and screwed (two screws only) to the table (around the plate). Took me literally 1 minute to do and ALL dust is caught.

The beauty of it is that since the bin is transparent, I can always see the amount of dust accumulated. When it's time to clean, I just pull the router plate and get all the dust with my vac's hose.

This would not be possible without the router plate.





I was already to buy the Bosch Bench Router Table (RA1181) when I finally got a copy of "Router Joinery Workshop" by Carol Reed. I really liked her design, and for the first time thought, "I could build that!"

I am surprised I haven't found much about the router table design on this or other wood working forums. I liked the idea of the router mounting directly to the table (3/8" acrylic) and not having an insert. This will be my first router table and I am envisioning using it for small projects (not doors or large panels!).

Any thoughts about this table? Has anyone else made one?

Thanks,
Sam
 

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Hi Sam,

That has to be one of the most practical and well thought out router table designs I have seen…simple to build, accurate and versatile.

The pivot fence and the ability to mount the router both vertically and horizontally are big advantages over the Bosch table…plus you will save yourself about $150 to boot!
 

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You download it from the Web...take care it's big file.and you must sign up as a member..b/4 it's free..

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Interesting book and appearing to warrant a HUGE premium in the US!

Abebooks lists UK bookshops with it at a tenth of the US s/h price.
(ISBN 1579903282)

Cheers

Peter
 

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You download it from the Web...take care it's big file.and you must sign up as a member..b/4 it's free..

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I must be missing something here... where's the download button?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Well, thanks for the encouragement -- I think I will give it a try. It would be a huge savings in money, but even more so I think it would be a very useful table. My understanding is that instead of different inserts, you make different tops. The piece of acrylic can be purchased for as little as $15.
 
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