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Hi Woodhog1

I have not used one but I don't know anyone selling them for 200.00 bucks, the norm is about 350.oo bucks plus :)
They didn't impress me to the point of putting hard cash out for one but that's just my 2 cents worth they look a bit lame.
BUT
I think Harry is using one of them ▼ you may want to drop him a PM and ask what he thinks about it :)

http://www.routerforums.com/table-mounted-routing/3982-router-table-fences-2.html#post38269
http://www.routerforums.com/private.php?do=newpm&userid=10844

http://00ed360.netsolstores.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=1392

http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?FamilyID=5088


Bj :)
 

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Woodhog, People keep trying to come up with better router tables. They are engineering them to extreme tolerances for precision used in metal working. This is a terrible waste of money. First off, wood moves. It breathes, absorbs moisture and changes size. This instantly makes those ultra fine tolerances useless. You can spend as much of your hard earned money as you like on these and still get results no better than with any other table. I am opposed to the idea of mounting your router underneath a table saw wing. This means every time you want to use one or the other you will have more set up to deal with. The location of the router makes it more difficult to change bits or adjustments. The sliding table idea is borrowed from european table saws. You will never convince me that sawdust wont get on the tracks and cause the table to move out of plane. Don't forget that metal requires care to prevent rust. If you work in the average garage shop you will be spending time each month caring for the metal when you could be wood working. Laminated router table tops require a shot of window cleaner once in a great while, followed with a quick wipe of a rag. You can also make pencil marks on the laminate for positioning, and by licking your thumb and a quick rub they are gone. Bob and Ricks "Simple is better" approach to routing makes sense to me.
If you have never seen the Router Workshop (as many members haven't) please watch it on www.thewoodworkingchannel.com
Once you see how simple this system is to use you will be hooked. I have built many router tables, nice ones at that. I have been converted. I think you might come to the same conclusions I did. Simple really is better.
 
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For $200 you can make a real fine table out of 3/4" MDF for the top, and whatever you want for the base.. You'll have a lot of change left over for bits, clamps, etc..

Right now, I'm building my 3rd router table top.. The first was a bunch of scrap counter top that I used to make the second one.. Now that I have an insert base plate, I'm making my 3rd top to accomodate it.. New fence to go along with it..

My very first router projects were the first 2 tops..
 

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Woodhog1 said:
Has anyone tried imported cast iron router tables sold online for approx two hundred?
Nope... sure haven't... I guess keeping a good flat top is the objective...

Here is a guy that I respect a lot... He uses Corian for the center sections of his tables.

http://www.plamann.com/sys-tmpl/intheshopiii/view.nhtml?profile=intheshopiii&UID=10005

http://www.plamann.com/sys-tmpl/intheshopiii/

http://www.plamann.com/sys-tmpl/door/

http://www.woodworkstuff.net/woodidxinspire.html

I was curious about his tables... emailed him... and that was his answer.
Corian with holes drilled for the router. (Nothing fancy at all)... I was surprised!
 
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