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A bit of background. I originally posted on the Router Forum to solve a problem I had with my router. As things developed I began to share what I was doing with my router and it was suggested that I begin a new thread focused on the building of a Cedar Strip Canoe.

The canoe that I am building is a redesign of the original Rob Roy double paddle canoe. It was originally built in 1866 and since that time many variations of the design were developed with changes to the length and beam. The original length of the Rob Roy was 15’ and included a lug sail and jib.

After looking at a few different offerings from various canoe and kayak builders I decided on a design offered by Sandy Point Boat Works. They named it ‘Little Rob’. The overall length is 14’ and still retains the original double paddle design with a partial fore and aft deck but no accommodation for sail.

After receiving the full size patterns and instructional CD’s I set to work first obtaining the required material for building the strong back (frame work that the canoe is built on). I also purchased MDF board for the stations (forms) verses plywood.

Once the strong back was built and the stations were cut out I positioned them on the strong back as per the plans.

I will include pictures with each post to show progress.
 

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Next step was making the inner and outer stems out of white ash. I cut 0.25” x 0.75” strips. I steam bent them and clamped the on forms to dry.
Once dry I was able to glue the two of the strips together for both the inner and outer stems. These were then positioned on the stem forms.

Some of the pictures end up rotating themselves 90 degrees.
 

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Like the pictures. I won't be building a canoe but I l like looking at how things are being done.
 
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Next I purchased rough cedar boards from Home Depot and Menards. I carefully selected knot free boards or almost knot free boards. I must have looked through 100+ boards to find enough good ones. I then ran all of the cedar boards through my planer to a dimension of 0.75”. After planning I cut strips of 0.25” thick. I found that I actually had enough strips to make two canoes so I will be storing some for a future project.
 

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Looks good and well presented. Looking forward to the rest of the build.
 

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Next important step was doing the final alignment of all of the stations from stem to stem. Once everything was square and aligned I stapled some strips to hold the stations firmly in place.

I then taped all of the edges of the stations so that once I started the gluing and stapling that the cedar strips would not adhere to the stations.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Today I was able to finally use the router to put a bead on one edge of the cedar strips. It took some time to set the router table up but once set I was able to feed each strip through the router using the subsequent strip to push the previous strip through the router.

I also put the bead edge on the accent strips that I will be using. The accent strips were Mahogany and Aspen.

Tomorrow I plan to reset the router up to put the cove on the opposite edge.
 

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Great job, Russell. Love the build pictures...keep em coming. I'm sure you will have a bunch of us following your project. Thanks for taking the extra time to take the photos and post them.
 

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Somebody recently asked how many clamps are enough...
Bwahahahaha
I guess this build puts that question to bed! :)
 

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Somebody recently asked how many clamps are enough...
Bwahahahaha
I guess this build puts that question to bed! :)
Funny how that always comes up. Whatever that number is, boatbuilding requires 10 times more.

OK, enough of the tomfoolery...now we gotta get to the serious questions.
 

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A bit of background. I originally posted on the Router Forum to solve a problem I had with my router. As things developed I began to share what I was doing with my router and it was suggested that I begin a new thread focused on the building of a Cedar Strip Canoe.

The canoe that I am building is a redesign of the original Rob Roy double paddle canoe. It was originally built in 1866 and since that time many variations of the design were developed with changes to the length and beam. The original length of the Rob Roy was 15’ and included a lug sail and jib.

After looking at a few different offerings from various canoe and kayak builders I decided on a design offered by Sandy Point Boat Works. They named it ‘Little Rob’. The overall length is 14’ and still retains the original double paddle design with a partial fore and aft deck but no accommodation for sail.

After receiving the full size patterns and instructional CD’s I set to work first obtaining the required material for building the strong back (frame work that the canoe is built on). I also purchased MDF board for the stations (forms) verses plywood.

Once the strong back was built and the stations were cut out I positioned them on the strong back as per the plans.

I will include pictures with each post to show progress.
OK, firstly thanks for starting the build thread. You're going to have lots of followers for this one.

First question. When you built that strong back, did you use winding sticks at both ends? If you're not sure what I'm talking about, then you didn't. It's quite important to do this.
 

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Next question...how many stations do you have athwartships? This is more a curiosity question than anything. I can't quite see them all at one time, looks like around 8 or so.

I see that you have put tape on the edges of the stations...dare I suggest that you take that off and put on some 6 mil poly instead. You're going to be using epoxy (right?) and that will stick to your blue tape.

Before you added the tape, did you use extremely good, long, one piece battens to bring the stations perfectly in line? This is absolutely necessary for a first class job.

More questions later...but the strips look pretty nice!
 
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Next step was making the inner and outer stems out of white ash. I cut 0.25” x 0.75” strips. I steam bent them and clamped the on forms to dry.
Once dry I was able to glue the two of the strips together for both the inner and outer stems. These were then positioned on the stem forms.

Some of the pictures end up rotating themselves 90 degrees.
Nice job on the stems. First time I did that I was thrilled with how they came out. And they are pretty easy to get into that perfect shape as well when you get to the fairing.

I notice that you have your centre lines marked nicely, good job there.

One thing I used to do (starting to come back to me now) when I mounted the stations, I put a piece of 1/4" plywood between the station and the strong back, just loosely, not glued.

When you are doing the fairing of the stations, you may need to shift one or more either up or down or even twist one slightly. That little space under the station gives you just that little bit of leeway that you may need. You clamp the station to the 2 x 2 that I think you have for the stations to fasten to first - then you do the rough fairing - then you can screw and glue the stations in place. You don't leave the plywood strips in there, that's just to give you fudging room.

Now for the big question...what do you have for battens?
 

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Russel..
thanks for the thread....

you have an addicted follower...
 

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This is a really interesting build, thanks for sharing it with us Russell. I'm looking forward to seeing how it progresses.
 

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Hey Russell, thanks for deciding to take the time to document your build. I think down the road, you'll reference and link to this build as often as anyone else :) So many variations on a theme :) Folks around here will find this of interest if only for the various techniques and process's involved. Not the least of which is watching and following as a quality build progress's.
Sandy Point boat works is one of the sites I have in my bookmarks. Excellent resource and they have a great selection of plans to choose from. From there I like the Chum and the Prospector. What characteristics in a canoe were you looking for when you were searching for a plan? I REALLY like the idea of a solo canoe, but too many grandkids coming of age and too little time and money. So a tandem will be the choice. I'll assume that you will primarily be paddling flatwater river/lakes?
Sooooooooooo... are you happy with the plans/DVD supplied by Sandy Point? Did you go with the package (plans/bits/fibreglass/epoxy)? Do you recall just how much cedar
you purchased? The idea of getting enough materials for a 2nd build is something I"ve considered. Around here, cedar strip canoes go for a premium and appear to sell quite quickly. Selling one, would easily pay for the building of both.
To the point where you are now, what have been the hits and misses? Did you find anything particularly challenging?
 
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What glue/adhesive did you decide to go with for the laminate portion of your build?
 

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