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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I don't know but the ad in the magazine said the square bearing would give you better control than a round bearing plus some more other info like glue not sticking to it. Hmmm... When does someone make a cut with wet glue in wood? Doesn't make any sense. I don't get it myself. I still think a round bearing is way better. But that's just my opinion.
 

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Kevin, my guess is that it gives you more bearing surface to use as a guide. Also would seem to eliminate dimples in the cut, where a round bearing would follow the exact surface it was on. My guess.

Dave
the "Doctor"
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Dr.Zook said:
Kevin, my guess is that it gives you more bearing surface to use as a guide. Also would seem to eliminate dimples in the cut, where a round bearing would follow the exact surface it was on. My guess.

Dave
the "Doctor"
Dr. Zook, your right. That's what it also said in the ad, more bearing surface to use as a guide.
 

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Here's the deal. the square part does not rotate. it slides along the work and therefore cannot burn the surface finish as a spinning bearing can. the bearing is spinning inside of the square part. glue/contact cement can build up on the metal bearing surface as it rubs along the material being trimmed. there is some heat in the spinning bearing that actually melts the glue just a little bit and it builds up on the metal bearing surfaces. the square teflon part is stick-free and the contact between the square part and the material never gets hot.
 

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pmspirito said:
Here's the deal. the square part does not rotate. it slides along the work and therefore cannot burn the surface finish as a spinning bearing can. the bearing is spinning inside of the square part. glue/contact cement can build up on the metal bearing surface as it rubs along the material being trimmed. there is some heat in the spinning bearing that actually melts the glue just a little bit and it builds up on the metal bearing surfaces. the square teflon part is stick-free and the contact between the square part and the material never gets hot.
I'm glad you answered that, I was afraid I would have too. I have seen these bit around for the last couple of years. I don't do much of that work so I never purchased one but liked the idea. I would like to here from someone who has one of these and find out how well they like it.

Ed
 

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This is a flush trim bit for plastic laminate they do work. That said in a production shop they don't seem to be worth the extra money. They are harder to keep clean, limated use ok .Bit is not foolproof I perfer to trim and bevel flat work on a router table and hand file to finish
 

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It look to me that the bearing is enclosed in a fibre or something square block with bevelled corners. It would give more bearing surface but the heat of the bearing would still be transmitted to the block and to the work. But then, the bit will be moving along and heat won't be a factor.
Mo
 
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