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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Thanks Kerry... not so very much daunting as time consuming. I always find it surprising how basic woodworking skills come into play on projects such as this one...
Master the basics and rest is all downhill...


Bill that is very impressive if not very daunting and at the same time inspirational. Congratulations.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
:) Thank you Mike!!! high praise indeed coming from you. :) Especially considering the many, many beautiful projects that fill this forum.

Hours? wayyyyyyyyyyyyyy to many *L*. If I had to guess I'd say well over 100. And alot of that was spent redoing to get it just right or just plain old fixing screwups. Like drilling a hole right through one side of the burl. I know I had as much time in the finish as in the construction to be sure. Alot of that due to doing a hand rubbed lacquer finish was new to me and the learning curve it took to get it where I wanted it.

Differently...hmmmmmmm says I.. Perhaps I'd have made the top just a bit thinner. Maybe by a 1/2" or so. Overall the table stands at 27 1/2" to the top. (customer request I guess I could say) and the thickness is just over 3 1/2"s. I do think I get away with it because of the width of the base (columns). The columns are mortised into the base and top. There I think I would have much rather just doweled a tennon in each end and then drilled holes. Of the 8 colums or 16 mortise/tenon combinations about 3 stand out if you look hard. 1 on the bottom, 2 in the top. Rounded tenons would have given a much cleaner look I think. Not to mention the time it took to chisel out 16 mortises. However, anything less than a critical eye will most likely not even notice. Finally.. the finish.. I would have DEFINITELY taken the time to do a few practice runs using the "new to me" techniques. Actually worked with 2 different techniques. One was just using good ole sandpaper and wet sanding up to 12000 grit and the other was using an orbital polisher and premium grade automotive finishes. Primarily products were Micro Mesh sand papers and Griots Garage polishing compounds. Along with a 6" and a 3" pneumatic sanders.

Can't say I know what "triple weighted tournament" pieces are :) sound cool though.
I can tell you that John set up his new pieces on the table and everyone in the room just smiled...

As with most of these kinda projects, it just cost of materials and ya get it when ya get it. When it was all said and done with, the smiles made everything absolutely worth while :)

life is good!

bill




Bill, in all my time on the forums this table is one of the nicest projects I have seen. How many hours went into this project? Any thing you would of done differently? The only thing missing is a set of triple weighted tournament pieces. Well done Bubba!
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Mike..

One thing I would have for certain done differently would have been to use traditional wood slides for the drawers instead of metal. Honestly not sure what I was thinking. It took a while to find 8" glides to begin with. No weight to speak of on the drawers, wood would have worked just as well and I think fit the theme of the project much better...

b .
 

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:) Thank you Mike!!! high praise indeed coming from you. :) Especially considering the many, many beautiful projects that fill this forum.

Hours? wayyyyyyyyyyyyyy to many *L*. If I had to guess I'd say well over 100. ........ Actually worked with 2 different techniques. One was just using good ole sandpaper and wet sanding up to 12000 grit and the other was using an orbital sander and premium grade automotive finishes. :)

life is good!

bill
Now I know it tould take me over 600 hours before I quit! :laugh: Curious on the sanding, how big of a difference between a low grit 220 and the grit you used and was it worth the time and effort?
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Marco... now thats a good question!!! First, MicroMesh grades its abrasives a bit differently than the ANSI or CAMI. What they call 1500 is close to what most of us would consider a 400 grit. Their 3200 is relative to a 1200 grit and so on up their range. In the 1500 range I would say that there is definitely a difference. (I did all of the sanding WET)
The scratch patterns and reflective quality of the surface, such as it is at 1500/400 grit were/was better. I have to say, this is just an opinion and little more. 3200/3600/4000 grits left behind progressively better surfaces but and this is a big BUT, you really had to work at it. Not so much being aggressive or grinding down on the work surface, just slooooowww and steady. Kernneling wasn't much of a concern in these grits which was nice but I still had to wipe the surface down routinely and proceed from there. Anything over the 4000 was more polishing than surface/material removal. The resulting finish was just beautiful, almost mirror quality. In a couple of the pictures you can see the reflection of my kitchen light in the table top. That does not even come close to what it looked like in real time. The light is a Tiffany style lamp and the details in the reflection where just awesome...
One of the things that really gave me fits was that the surface has to be dead flat at those types of reflection ranges. The slightest ripple/wave/imperfection sticks out like a sore thumb if the surface isn't dead nuts flat. Jumping grits or skipping a grit range or two doesn't cut it either. You have to really work at removing the old scratches and pretty much replacing them with newer, finer ones. Basically your swapping one gritty scratch for a new finer one until you get into the polishing grits. (which is how I came to start referring to them, 4000 and up abrasives. Not something that MicroMesh uses)
Hmmmmmmmm so was it worth the time/effort and expense. A assortment for woodworking ran about 44 bucks if I recall correctly. Once you get used to what to look for, how to progress through the grits, the process moves along pretty smoothly, doesn't take forever, yet, does take time!! SO to answer your question, I'd have to say on high end type of projects, Yes, it was worth it.
the other process I used was polishing compounds and they produced even better results than the abrasives. The cost of compounds was reasonable. 50 bucks or so for machine compounds 1 thru 4. The real expensive comes with needing to have an orbital polisher. I'd also say that you will still need to flatten out the surface with up to a 1500/400 grit using a stiff pad or the equivalent.
I finished off the top with a polishing glaze followed up with 2 coats of a best of show carnuba wax...

HTH
bill
 

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A work of art! I admire your patience on this project. Your reward was the "tip" the customer gave you plus the satisfaction of knowing the job was done using your WW skills. Thanks for sharing the story and the pictures!
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Thank you for the kind words John. :) the rewards on this project were many! :):)

A work of art! I admire your patience on this project. Your reward was the "tip" the customer gave you plus the satisfaction of knowing the job was done using your WW skills. Thanks for sharing the story and the pictures!
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Dan.... very good to see you back and posting regularly!!! I've been watching your workhorse thread. Thank you for the kind words. I know what you mean by time limiting inspiration. I got a phone call this morning, from the guy for whom I made this table, his cousin seen the table and wants to know if I'd make a poker table for him.. *L*..man, the wheel instantly began turning. ALMOST as fast as the hands on the clock...


Nice job, this is on my list as well to get done but time has not been easy to find. Definetly something I want to make.

Thanks for sharing you have inspired me once again.
 

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That chess table is outstanding! Love it! Thanks for sharing.
Router Roman, do a search on Bass Pro Shops, Cabela's, etc. and you should find some examples of fly tying tables, from simple table top to very fancy floor models. Also, go to any store that had fly fishing magazines and look at the back of the magazine. You will see ads for these items.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Thank you John... Appreciate the kind comment. Glad you enjoy it.

I relocated Roman's question to the plans/how to section. He should have better luck getting a response there instead of leaving his query buried in here.. :)

That chess table is outstanding! Love it! Thanks for sharing.
Router Roman, do a search on Bass Pro Shops, Cabela's, etc. and you should find some examples of fly tying tables, from simple table top to very fancy floor models. Also, go to any store that had fly fishing magazines and look at the back of the magazine. You will see ads for these items.
 
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