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I clean my table saw blade by soaking it in water and liquid laundry detergent. Would that work for band saw blades? It might rust. what do y'all do?
 

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Same as i do for table saw, miter saw, router bits...Trend Bit & Blade Cleaner. The band saw blade takes a touch more patience--about 111" worth!!

earl
another vote for the Trend...
 

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Never had a bandsaw blade that needed cleaning. What are you cutting?

Herb
Sir Herb, on my Lumbermate sawmill, there is a water attachment which is supposed to serve the double purpose of both cleaning and cooling the blade. Generally speaking, it works well.

But when you get a log with pitch, typically douglas fir, it sometimes gums up on the back edge of the tooth.

I used to spray the blade with widdely diddley 40 and then use a wire brush as I wound the blade through the sharpener. That gets it clean.

Those blades are 7/8" pitch, by 1 1/4" by 144".
 

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I clean my table saw blade by soaking it in water and liquid laundry detergent. Would that work for band saw blades? It might rust. what do y'all do?
It WILL rust. Make sure you dry the blade as best you can, then a light spray with WD40 to keep the rust at bay.
 

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Sir Herb, on my Lumbermate sawmill, there is a water attachment which is supposed to serve the double purpose of both cleaning and cooling the blade. Generally speaking, it works well.

But when you get a log with pitch, typically douglas fir, it sometimes gums up on the back edge of the tooth.

I used to spray the blade with widdely diddley 40 and then use a wire brush as I wound the blade through the sharpener. That gets it clean.

Those blades are 7/8" pitch, by 1 1/4" by 144".
I guess it is because I don't use any DougFir or any other pitchy lumber. I use mostly hardwoods, or non pitchy softwoods.

Herb
 

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I guess it is because I don't use any DougFir or any other pitchy lumber. I use mostly hardwoods, or non pitchy softwoods.

Herb
Absolutely correct, a non pitchy wood shouldn't gum up the blade.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I do cut a lot of pine but I also cut hard woods.
 

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It WILL rust. Make sure you dry the blade as best you can, then a light spray with WD40 to keep the rust at bay.
please...
not WD...

.
WD-40 isn't actually a true lubricant. WD stands for "water displacing" and its main use is as a solvent or rust dissolver.
The lubricant-like properties of WD-40 come not from the substance itself, but from dissolving components. And the effect doesn't last.
WD-40 can be a good substance to start with — it can help clean up rust or other grime. But depending on what you're working with, you should probably follow up WD-40 with use of a true lubricant such as one based on silicone, grease, Teflon, or graphite.

WD-40 is hygroscopic and will attract moisture...
Because WD-40 isn't a lubricant, it really will not work well on drive chains of any type.
WD-40 doesn't have enough lubrication affect to be useful on any type of gearing.
Never use WD-40 on door hinges or anything you want to keep clean. It attracts dirt and dust. It will turn your hinge pins black ..
WD-40 can wash dirt into a bike chain, ruining the chain and taking out the gears along with it.
dad ruined his kid's $800 clarinet by using WD-40 on "the squeaky part" — and no, that isn't the entire clarinet
WD-40, which contains petroleum distillates (paint thinner) that can melt and seize plastic...

keep it away from electrical. Fire hazard and ruins plastic components. Electrically conductive
Keep it out your bearings.. it isn't a lubricant. Will attract crud and moisture. Will break down what lubricant that is in the bearing...

Paintball guns. WD-40 can melt the seals in the guns.
Locks. The spray can prematurely wear down the internal mechanisms, especially in the pin tumbler locks, in door locks and padlocks. Go for graphite powder.
iPods and iPads. WD-40 won't repair the Home button on these devices. In fact, the spray can cause the plastic to break down on the cover, and if some gets inside the electronics, it can damage plastic parts inside.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I got some WD40 on some pistol ammo one time and it killed the primers. :crying:
 

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please...
not WD...

.
I'm aware that WD40 stands for the 40th attempt the company made for this product.

My mill is located right on the oceanside and blades would get rusty there in short order. Perhaps because these blades would last for only 2,200 board feet on average, and because the mill was used fairly constantly throughout the spring to fall seasons, the blades rarely lasted more than a week or two. For this period of time WD40 worked just fine.

When new blades were kept over the winter I used LPS3, which is used year round to cover the innards of outboard motors among other things. The sharpening shed where these blades were kept was just 4 posts and a roof, so it was wide open to the marine air.
 

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a lot of WW'ers don't mill 2200 BF in the better part of a decade...
I do try to keep these folks in mind...
what works for some can spell grief for others...
WD at the mill is a far cry different than in a hobbyist's work shop...
and to get that stuff on a project just before finishing can result in a disaster...
or using it and in the long run things were only made worse...
ie.. trunnion mechanisms for one..
it's also catastrophic death for bearings....

point counter point is a good thing...
let the folks out there make up their own informed minds....
 

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a lot of WW'ers don't mill 2200 BF in the better part of a decade...
I do try to keep these folks in mind...
what works for some can spell grief for others...
WD at the mill is a far cry different than in a hobbyist's work shop...
and to get that stuff on a project just before finishing can result in a disaster...
or using it and in the long run things were only made worse...
ie.. trunnion mechanisms for one..
it's also catastrophic death for bearings....

point counter point is a good thing...
let the folks out there make up their own informed minds....
Well, you'd be right about that. I would usually average 2,000 BF a week when milling. The main trouble was that I had to drag all my logs up out of the ocean first. A long and tiring job.

With the blade actually in use, I don't think that any WD40 would really end up on the lumber. What with the steady stream of water and the sawdust coming out of the kerf, I doubt any of the WD would survive more than a second or two, and then the blade would be totally clean.
 

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I use a very simple receipe. Use 2 teaspoons of cooking soda mixed with 1 teaspoon of vinegar in about 2 pints of water, soak the blade in a bucket that the solution just covers the blade. Leave the blade to soak for about an hour, remove & dry with a cloth making sure the blade is properly dry. I use this solution for my circular saw blade & router bits, it works extremely well ---- try it!
 

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Trend and CMT...whichever jumps into my hand first...bits, blades, all tools...
 

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I use a very simple receipe. Use 2 teaspoons of cooking soda mixed with 1 teaspoon of vinegar in about 2 pints of water, soak the blade in a bucket that the solution just covers the blade. Leave the blade to soak for about an hour, remove & dry with a cloth making sure the blade is properly dry. I use this solution for my circular saw blade & router bits, it works extremely well ---- try it!
I don't get it, the baking soda (sodium bi carbonate) added to vinegar ( acetic acid) neutralizes the acid and produces sodium acetate, carbon dioxide and water. What does that do to clean?

Herb
 

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