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Can I use Clear shellack over a krylon type spray paint? I am clueless here. I have a dining table that I want to refinish the top. I bought it last year and soon after the finish on the surface started flaking off. I wanted to sand and paint the top black. I don't know what kind of topcoat to use. It needs to be a durable one as it is our main dining table. I was going for a more flat-satin finish. Thanks in advance for your help.
 

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Hi Katie

Just my 2 cents :)

As you know Krylon makes many types of paint,Auto Enamel,Latex,Lacquer,etc. and they all have a different base just like Shellack as it's own base, water,mineral spirits,etc. I would not mix them in different coats.
I would use a wipe on ploy to give it a hard finish coat and a flat-satin finish.(3 coats)

But that's just my 2 cents ,If Jerry sees this post maybe he will jump on it and give a hint or two how to use both types .(shellack)
But as you know they use spar shellack on boats and it's hard and will last a long time if it's done right, also think about the epoxy coats, takes a long time to dry but will stand up to abuse.

Bj :)
 

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Yes you can put shellac over paint(I believe shellac would stick to peanut butter). There are probably better choices available,what is the finish on the table now?. Why do you want to paint the table and what look are you going for,and lastly what kind and how much wear will this table receive.

Regards

Jerry
 

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Discussion Starter #4
bobj3 said:
I would use a wipe on ploy to give it a hard finish coat and a flat-satin finish.(3 coats)

also think about the epoxy coats, takes a long time to dry but will stand up to abuse.

Bj :)
Bob
Do you mean wipe on poly over paint or on it's own? What type/brand of epoxy do you suggest? I am not familliar with that.

Jerry
I am not sure what type of finish is on it now. It is wierd. It looked like it was stained and varnished or laquered with some sort of a semigloss topcoat. The weird part is that when it started flaking off, it seemed to take the color/stain off with it. The pedastal is fine so I thought I could paint it black on the top and leave the pedastal brown the way it is. I was going for that low sheen black on top with stained on bottom (pottery barn) sot of look. I will try to find a picture and post it. I need it to be a very durable finish. We eat on this table at least 3 times a day. My kids spill food on it so it deeds to be easy to clean. They also use it for artwork and just about everything else.
 

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The way most of this type of furniture is finished is by bleaching the natural color out of the wood,sealing,glazing and then top coating with lacquer. Lacquer is a nice finish but it will not stand up to the wear and tear of a table used as described and it had problems with some of the normal cleaning products used today. My advise would be to strip the top and finish with whatever color you prefer and topcoat with a phenolic resin varnish.Waterlox original varnish and Rockhard varnish are twobrands. If I didn't explain well enough,please let me know.

Regards

Jerry
 

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I'd like to add my 2 cents worth. If I were going for the look in the pic - I'd strip the finish that is on it now and then stain it with a really dark stain. I just used a 'gel' stain for a table and it came out very nice. The color was "java" but I don't remember the brand off-hand. (if your interested I can look it up tomorrow, I'm sure I have notes in my log).

After you achieve the color then you can put on a top coat. I love shellac and it the safest finish there is but you won't get that satin look. I like General Finishes Oil-Polyurethane Wipe-on Finish (I get this at Woodcraft but Rocker proably carries it too.) This product goes on easy, dries in 24 hours (unless your dewpoint is over 55-60). I put on 4 coats on a coffee table. On the last I buffed with "0000" steel wool and Johnson Paste Wax. It really had a great look. While I never used this on a DR table I think it would be tough enough.

Can you remove the top so you can turn it over and experiment on the underside? You can use plywood covered with oil cloth for a few weeks while you work on the table.

I thought the finish flaking off was pretty wierd. The only project I ever had that problem with was table to go alongside the grill on the deck. The wood was cedar and the I used a spar varnish. After a year in Minnesota back yard the finish just pealed off.

Good luck!
 

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Katie...

Another 2 cents... :)

I agree on stripping... all the way to wood... Citristrip works good for me.
I like the idea of removing the top & laying some ply on it til done.
After stripping, let it dry good, sand smooth to no more than 220 grit.
Experiment with some dark stain (maybe an ebony stain) and follow the directions closely.
Once you get the color you like... and you have let it DRY... very DRY...
Do a very light sanding to knock off any more raised grain.
Wipe off really good with a clean dry cotton cloth (rag).
Then, start the protective finish... I think you want a Satin finish rather than Gloss or Semi Gloss.
I agree with General Finishes "Arm-R-Seal" wipe on Heavy Duty oil & urethane top coat... Give it as many coats as you feel like doing...
1. Wipe on a coat.
2. If you have good drying conditions, let dry for about 6-8 hours; else, 24 hrs.
3. Buff lightly with 0000 steel wool (after each coat except the final coat)
4. Go back to step 1 for another coat... 4-5 coats would probably do it... go as far as want after that... :) :)

Take your time and do it right...

Some finishing help here:
http://woodworkstuff.net/sgaquar1.html
http://woodworkstuff.net/woodidxfin.html
http://woodworkstuff.net/

There is a section on Finishing on my website that could help you... take a look.

If you can, let us know how it came out.

Edit:
I just noticed the last posting date... she will probably be finished with it by the time she reads this... Oh well... 1 cent worth? :) :)
 

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Yes you can put shellac over paint(I believe shellac would stick to peanut butter). There are probably better choices available,what is the finish on the table now?. Why do you want to paint the table and what look are you going for,and lastly what kind and how much wear will this table receive.

Regards

Jerry
these are two tables i am going to use around my office desk. they will actually only be used for file trays, ..will have the monitor sitting on one.. but that would not cause wear. painting the tables because i wanted an office with a diff color scheme than the usual....oak finish, cherry, ya know what i mean.... i plan on building a computer table/desk to match the tables.
 
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