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Theo
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I found this both interesting, and while looking for something altogether different. Figured you CNC guys would find it interesting too.
Bandsaw vs CNC
 

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Oliver (Prof. Henry)
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For what it's worth, I have cut many a gear on both the bandsaw and the scroll saw and never could I cut one as quickly as Matthias did. My times were more in the 15 - 20 minute range. Plus, after cutting I always needed a lot of tweaking with sandpaper to get a smooth functioning gear. That's probably just a sign of my poor cutting skills but it is precisely why the precision of cnc holds so much attraction for me.
 

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Not say anything negative about CNC, I think it is really for particular purposes, and not that many of us are going to make anywhere near full use of a CNC. So this was an interesting to see this comparison. I finally got my new router setup operational, have some really good saws, lots of accessories and tools. Before I would consider a CNC, I'd have to have a very clear idea of what I was going to use it for. To me, the price of a good machine is going to be north of $10,000 and momma would be very upset if it didn't produce income. Guess it doesn't matter if you have money to burn.
 

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Oliver (Prof. Henry)
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Not say anything negative about CNC, I think it is really for particular purposes, and not that many of us are going to make anywhere near full use of a CNC. So this was an interesting to see this comparison. I finally got my new router setup operational, have some really good saws, lots of accessories and tools. Before I would consider a CNC, I'd have to have a very clear idea of what I was going to use it for. To me, the price of a good machine is going to be north of $10,000 and momma would be very upset if it didn't produce income. Guess it doesn't matter if you have money to burn.
A very valid analysis, Tom. I don't intend to make money on mine (but not adverse to doing so) and it is basically a hobby machine for me. Of course mine was significantly less than your $10,000+ machine. And to add more perspective, it still cost less than my wife's sewing machine.

I'm not sure of the full use criteria because I'm not sure I get full use of my other tools. As much time as I spend in my shop, the table saw often goes weeks without use. On some projects the table saw lies fallow and only the bandsaw, scrollsaw, or drill press get a work out.

That's another reason my router table folds up and down. It goes for long periods without use and doesn't need to take up space. Time will tell if my cnc purchase was wise or foolish. At the moment, I am enjoying it greatly.
 

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Rick
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I don't think a cnc router table replaces all your tools , it's just an extension of your tools . And an interesting one at that .
I couldn't see making that sign with the rose in it by hand , and it certainly wouldn't have turned out that perfect if it was .

I hope to own a cnc someday , especially in this age of technology and prices getting better.
25 years ago a guy couldn't fathom owning one , and the software would have been a pita to use back then also .
Nowadays the average person can own one , and the files for building things are practically endless.

I'm amazed by the recent interest in them lately , and I never really noticed many posts regarding them six months ago .
And I'm certainly happy for those who own one to learn on and play with
 

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Theo
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Time will tell if my cnc purchase was wise or foolish. At the moment, I am enjoying it greatly.
Ah, reminds me of my wood lathe, years ago. Loved that thing, made a load of shavings on the floor, actually made a thing or two, and then made a carving mallet. And discovered that was the only thing I liked to make on the lathe. So, made about a dozen or so, different sizes and woods so different weights. Then sold the lathe, and haven't regretted it since.
 
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I've been watching Mathias for as long as he's been making youtube videos. I respect his ingenuity for making machines the rest of us just buy, and in the process learns (and shares) much more about the subtle workings of those machines. His pantorouter and the projects he did that preceded its conception show me that he would have a CNC if money and space permitted it. Not to replace any other tools, but instead to exploit what a CNC can uniquely do.

In the college furniture design shop I teach in, we have one large "ordinary" Multicam CNC that cranks out everything that everyone else can make a Multicam CNC crank out. We also have 3 smaller CNCs, two of which have been configured with open beds supporting custom jigging/fixtures. I oversee these small CNCs and push them to solve furniture joinery and part creation challenges that stump every other machine in our shop. We can easily make the same gears Mathias makes using a bandsaw. We prefer to make conical and toroidal gears just because it is hard. I'd love to let Mathias loose in our small CNC shop. I suspect his engineering mind would love it.

4D
 

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Mike
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Ah, reminds me of my wood lathe, years ago. Loved that thing, made a load of shavings on the floor, actually made a thing or two, and then made a carving mallet. And discovered that was the only thing I liked to make on the lathe. So, made about a dozen or so, different sizes and woods so different weights. Then sold the lathe, and haven't regretted it since.
You are absolutely right if you can't utilize the capabilities of the machine then it is not worth sinking all that money into one.

That is why one of the first question when contemplating the purchase of a CNC should be "What will you use it for?". If the answer is "I'm not really sure, but I think it would be nice to own on, they make neat things" then I think at will most likely be something else that takes up space in your shop.

You should have a need for it before you can justify paying for one unless your actual goal is to spend every dollar you have on tools, then this will help you meet that goal faster.
 
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