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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All....
I'm looking for ideas how to go about building a Coat Tree. It would have four tapered legs that form the base. The legs would gently tapered, and come together for attachment. Then the four legs simply spay out at a slight angle to form four posts for coats/hats.
If anyone has made such a coat tree, I'd be very interested how you went about it.
This seems pretty simple, but making a solid connection of the 4 legs ..... looking for help & ideas.
The is a project for my son, he asked me to created this for his new house.....
Thanks everyone, looking forward for any and all ideas.....
Ed
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have an idea after sleeping on it....I know the width & height my son wants. I'm gathering a long sheet of scrap cardboard, laying out the rough outside dimensions. I'm kinda "sketchy" on laptop drafting type programs.......& I want a full-size mock-up where the four legs come together to try a few ways to attach them.
Thanks John..
As, I figure it out I'lll get the finished product on here for ya too see...
 

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Are you considering steam bending wood for the four legs? A couple of wet overcoats can be fairly heavy, so merely cutting curved shapes for the four feet means they will have a tendency to breaking at their weakest points. Steam bending will give you a nice curve, with strength. Joining them to a post may mean keeping the top of each leg straight so you can work them into slots at the base of the post for the stand.

If you use steam bending, you will need to make a jig to the shape of the leg, to hold in in place while it dries. The jig has two pieces. each the shape of the final piece, but one is a positive shape, the other is a negative shape. Here's an even simpler method, including a nifty steam box build.

Place the steamed piece quickly into the jig, then put the second piece in place and as fast as possible, pull the two shaped pieces together with clamps. to force the steamed piece into the exact shape.

I've seen so many designs over my lifetime, that I agree you should search coat trees and start collecting pictures.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi Tom......
I came up with a design... I was out in my workshop making a pattern & testing angles this afternoon. Heat wave here in Upper Michigan low 30's unheated garage workshop.........
Looks kinda crude now, I plan to ease all the edges with a router round-over bit.
Here's the rough, I mean very rough design.
I plan on using dowels to attach the top hooks, maybe mortise and tenon joints for the legs.........
Furniture Table Wood Outdoor furniture Floor

Theodolite Wood Tool Bicycle fork Electric blue
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I stopped at our local lumber products sawmill, (Bell Forest Products) today. Hand picked the Red Oak with a somewhat straight grain, about as good as you can get in my opinion.
I'm very fortunate to have such a lumber supply house in my back yard, they ship wood all over the country!
When I'm finished in a few weeks, I'll post a photo or two......
Thanks for stopping by.......
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The base of the tree is 20 inches across, while the top hangars are 17 inches across to avoid tipping. The photo doesn't really show the spacing very well.
I think the 3 inch difference would be sufficient.......But agreed a wider base would provide better stability.
It's kinda a dance between form & function.
Thanks, take care
 

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Are you considering steam bending wood for the four legs? A couple of wet overcoats can be fairly heavy, so merely cutting curved shapes for the four feet means they will have a tendency to breaking at their weakest points. Steam bending will give you a nice curve, with strength. Joining them to a post may mean keeping the top of each leg straight so you can work them into slots at the base of the post for the stand.

If you use steam bending, you will need to make a jig to the shape of the leg, to hold in in place while it dries. The jig has two pieces. each the shape of the final piece, but one is a positive shape, the other is a negative shape. Here's an even simpler method, including a nifty steam box build.

Place the steamed piece quickly into the jig, then put the second piece in place and as fast as possible, pull the two shaped pieces together with clamps. to force the steamed piece into the exact shape.

I've seen so many designs over my lifetime, that I agree you should search coat trees and start collecting pictures.
Agree, I've been steam bending for a couple of years. I use an old propane deep fryer as my steam generator.
For bending any tight curves I've learned to use multiple thin strips of wood.
There is a lot of information put on the web.
 

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If you are still looking for a design idea - here's one that looks a lot like what you've come up with. Not sure that its bent -- looks to me like the grain doesn't follow the curve. From crate and barrel:
Tate Storage Coat Rack Tree + Reviews | Crate & Barrel. As an alternative to steam bending, you could consider making each 'leg' from two pieces - each with the grain running parallel to the long dimension and then put them together with a bridle joint - which would be plenty strong enough. You could even make the top pieces out of different stock to give it a different color.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Funny you sent this, that's what my son had sent over as a style he liked.
I've started taking my rough design above and have moved to constructing it. I'm using sliding dovetails to lock in all the legs & tops. So far it's coming along pretty well........
 

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I can't tell from the Crate/Barrel pictures how they did it - but how are you putting the leg/top assemblies together where all four meet? A piece of square stock and some dowels or ?? Looks like a fun build.
 

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Great result…
 
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Thank you............
The only thing I didn't like was using Red Oak. Tear-out was a little bothersome, but minor. Cherry would have been my preferred wood, but it was what my son wanted it made from.
 
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