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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys,

I recently bought a 1/4" collet for my old MOF 177E. I tried to fit it in for the first time this morning, with a straight bit it. When I started tightening the collet nut, I noticed the collet was too far down into the shaft, so I unscrewed the nut but the collet stayed inside along with the bit. They both seem to be jammed in there. Do y'all have any idea on how to get the collet and bit out, preferably without destroying them in the process?

Here's a picture of where I'm at...

 

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if the bit is bottomed out in the shaft the waters will get muddied...

for tapping use wood, brass hammer or facing hammer...
no steel tools allowed...

Heat will often break the bond that is holding them...
A soldering iron works very very well for this...
more concentrated heat...
in the same vein you could go w/ cold... pack the bit/collet in ice for a while...

rotate the bit/collet while lightly tapping on the side of the collet...
Hold the router with the loosened collet nut resting on the workbench or the edge of a board and tap/rap the nut (not the bit and not the shaft) a couple of times.
still not working???
do the same to the collet on it's shoulder w/ the nut off...
 

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ON ANOTHER NOTE...

Hello N/A and welcome to the forums...
we have put together some light reading for you...
As in, we've put some helpful information together at this here link to help you w/ your routering... We hope it to be useful to you... Enjoy...
Do take some time and read the safety PDF's... PLEASE!!!
Blood and trips to the ER, we find, are very annoying... Not to mention – expensive...
 

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When you finally get the collet and bit out of the router shaft using the methods above, I believe that your collet is designed for the collet nut to snap into the groove of that collet. When they snap together, the design allows the collet to be pulled out of the router shaft by just loosening the nut an extra turn that causes the nut to pull the collet and installed bit out of the router. They then remain together until you decide separate them, should you need to replace a damaged collet some time in the future. At that time, you can then unsnap the collet from the nut and then snap the new collet into the nut.

Charley
 

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Where there's a problem, there's a prevention

Problem: Giving up when the nut tightens up after initially loosening
Prevention:

Although it might sound funny if you're familiar with self-releasing collets, these experts tell us they've helped countless customers who simply needed to continue loosening their collets after feeling them initially loosen. Self-releasing collets—usually identifiable by a snap ring or other device that holds the collet and nut together—have two "break" points: the initial one, and then about two turns later another that releases the bit.

Problem: Dirty collet
Prevention:

Blow out the collet regularly with a blast of compressed air. If needed, clean the collet and threads with a soft brush and mineral spirits. (For a self-releasing collet, you might have to remove the snap ring to disassemble it.)

Problem: Dirty bit shanks
Prevention:
Wipe router bit shanks with a cloth and mineral spirits; lightly polish with ultra fine grit abrasive or polishing compound to remove rust or tough grime.

Problem: Over-tightened nut
Prevention:
You don't need to tighten a collet nut as much as you would bolts while assembling a machine, such as a tablesaw. Instead, tighten the nut only about one-eighth of a turn after it snugs up.

Problem: Bottomed-out bit
Prevention:

When installing a bit in the collet, push it to the bottom, and then pull it back up at least an 1⁄8 " before tightening. This gives the collet some room to expand downward while compressing a firm grip on the shank.

Problem: Leaving bits in a router too long
Prevention:
If you're not using a bit and it's been in the collet more than a few days, remove it from your router. Humidity can cause rust even inside a collet, and that can seize a bit shank inside the collet.
 

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if the bit is bottomed out in the shaft the waters will get muddied...
I went to edit what I said but the edit feature had timed out...
let's rewrite what I said...

If the bit is bottomed out in the shaft the waters will get muddied and the degree of difficulty just increased...

for tapping, use wood, brass hammer, wood mallet or a facing/dead blow hammer...
NO STEEL TOOLS ALLOWED!!!...

Heat will often break the bond that is holding them...
A soldering iron works very very well for this...
it'll be a more concentrated heat and not damaging anything like the router or it's bearings...
when you apply the heat stand the router up so your bit is pointing up... no sense in cooking the bearing or other vitals...
in the same vein you could go w/ cold... pack the bit/collet in ice for a while...
this time w/ the bit pointing down...
no sense in putting/getting water in the motor...

Hold the router with the loosened collet nut resting on the workbench or the edge of a board and tap/rap the nut (not the bit and not the shaft) a few times or more...
still not working???
do the same to the collet this time, tapping on it's shoulder only w/ the nut off...
be mindful of the shaft's threads...

if all of this fails – a stud puller is a last resort and you can bet your last dollar you will need a new collet and router bit...
 
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Correct me if I'm wrong but isn't the nut is supposed to pull the collet loose
They don’t always stay snapped together. One of mine wouldn’t. I wound up replacing it with a Musclechuck because of that. Until I replaced it I was often going through the procedure Stick outlined.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Wow, thanks y'all for all those replies. This one is my first Elu router and I did indeed make the rookie mistake of NOT snapping the collet into the nut before tightening it in.
I took out the base, propped the base of the shaft against a piece of wood and tapped the collet with another piece of wood and hammer, rotating it every tap...and lo and behold, after five minutes of tapping/swearing at my own stupidity, the collet did break lose!
Thank you all so much for the advice and the wealth of information & wisdom contained on this board. Long time reader, second or third time poster. I've been working in shops for a while now and one trip to the ER convinced me to be mindful of my fingers (or other body parts) at all times. I do have a shorter left thumb that serves as a reminder when needed.

:)
 

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glad ya got it N/A..

ROUTER ON!!!!
 
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