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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have seen posts where people are using adapters so that different sizes of cutter are able to be used. Is it possible to get collet adapters that would allow me to use some of my machinist cutters? Sizes that I'm interested in using are 3/16,5/16&3/8
Thanks
 

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Hello jim !

Welcome here.
You will get some answers soon, but it would be easier if you tell us a bit more
about the router you are using.
router collets are specific to a machine.
Adapters are not specific, but not so accurate.
Machinist system is more flexible , accurate , and expensive , they are in use with cnc 's .(and mechanics).

Regards.
gérard
 

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Collet adapters are widely available. For example, Bushing Adapters - Lee Valley Tools,
https://www.mlcswoodworking.com/shopsite_sc/store/html/smarthtml/pages/bushing_ball_bearings.html?zoom_highlight=collet+adapters and, by far the widest range of sizes available that I know of is https://www.toolstoday.com/high-precision-steel-router-collet-reducers.html?variantids=5543,0&keywords=RB-102&gdffi=f04169a8e17442cdb77db9a3c0426f4d&gdfms=51DF9EA84DCC47C28D306C9A710963F4 are three sources.
I have no doubt @harrysin will see this thread and advocate for the MuscleChuck system, but they do not include the 3/16 and 5/16 adapters http://www.musclechuck.com/shop/
 
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Jim,

While adapters exist, I am a believer in "just because it fits, it doesn't necessarily mean you should use it". Make sure whatever you plan on spinning with a router is rated for the speed. 12,00-24,000 rpm is a lot faster than your average milling machine. I am not sure how a cutter engineered to spin at 5000 rpm would work at that speed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks guys
I have used different kinds of collet system on CNC equipment. As a general rule the are pricey to say the least.
I would like to see what's available and cost. Probably be cheaper to buy good cutters and get resharpened when dull.
And YES the rpm may be a problem and if I try it I will probably use remote to turn on from a distance Hahahaha
This kind of conversation is exactly what I need to hear thanks again
 

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I've heard of guys using milling cutters but I don't know how well they worked. And they may have used speed controls to slow the router down to use them at that. Also bits made for cutting metal may not have optimal cutting geometry for wood. Wood cutting bits may have a steeper cutting angle than metal cutting bits to shear wood as opposed to more of a scraping action. All of my mill cutters are also HSS instead of carbide and HSS doesn't wear as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Charles,Very good point about geometry. I would expect that the cutter would not perform well in wood. I was thinking since I had them they might work for figuring out processes however the right tool for the job is always a better choice.
Thanks
Jim
 

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Thanks guys
I have used different kinds of collet system on CNC equipment. As a general rule the are pricey to say the least.
I would like to see what's available and cost. Probably be cheaper to buy good cutters and get resharpened when dull.
And YES the rpm may be a problem and if I try it I will probably use remote to turn on from a distance Hahahaha
This kind of conversation is exactly what I need to hear thanks again
You have answered your own question Jim. By the way, very few routologists use HSS bits, Tungsten is the norm and they do a lot of work before needing sharpening in which case they go to a specialist. You're choice of Hitachi is a good one, only bettered (in my humble opinion) by Makita!
 
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You have answered your own question Jim. By the way, very few routologists use HSS bits, Tungsten is the norm and they do a lot of work before needing sharpening in which case they go to a specialist. You're choice of Hitachi is a good one, only bettered (in my humble opinion) by Makita!
I'm not sure there is any difference Harry. My M12V looks suspiciously like your new Makita. Hre's another example Both of these are Model 1900 B. The older models were even more similar.
 

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