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Discussion Starter #1
Ok, here's the problem...

I have two plunge routers and the plunge action needs to be lubricated but I don't want to use anything that attracts dirt or dust because the columns will get plugged to the point of uselessness.

1. how do you clean your plunge columns?

2. what do you use to lubricate them?

3. have you modified your router in some way to "adjust" to a job and if so, how?

4. do you inventory parts and change them out or do you "go to bust" and then fix it?

5. do you do your own repairs or take them to a "specialist?"

6. what are the common repairs that you effect yourself?

7. are there things that you do to your router that you think others could also be able to do?

thanks for the help.
 

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Ok, here's the problem...

I have two plunge routers and the plunge action needs to be lubricated but I don't want to use anything that attracts dirt or dust because the columns will get plugged to the point of uselessness.

1. how do you clean your plunge columns?

2. what do you use to lubricate them?

3. have you modified your router in some way to "adjust" to a job and if so, how?

4. do you inventory parts and change them out or do you "go to bust" and then fix it?

5. do you do your own repairs or take them to a "specialist?"

6. what are the common repairs that you effect yourself?

7. are there things that you do to your router that you think others could also be able to do?

thanks for the help.
Ron, whenever the plunge starts to tighten I dismantle the router, give everything a thorough clean and rub in the minutest amount of CRC then reassemble. Normally I would do my own repairs, but as my main two routers are made by MAKITA, repairs are seldom required in spite of my heavy usage. The only improvements to my routers has been making a six step depth of cut adjuster which makes deep plunge routing in 4mm steps a breeze. Then there was the external light, later changed to an illuminated base which is literally "brilliant". I blow compressed air through the routers regularly.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Harry:

...rub in the minutest amount of CRC then reassemble. Normally I would do my own repairs, but as my main two routers are made by MAKITA, repairs are seldom required in spite of my heavy usage. The only improvements to my routers has been making a six step depth of cut adjuster which makes deep plunge routing in 4mm steps a breeze. Then there was the external light, later changed to an illuminated base which is literally "brilliant". I blow compressed air through the routers regularly.
What's "CRC?"

Thanks Harry. I'll add all your improvements to the list.

Ron
 

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You definitely want to use a dry lubricant. I have had pretty good success with using past wax on the columns. Regardless of what you use, sawdust will conspire to break it down over time and repeated lubes will be necessary. I always disassemble, blow out the debris and re-wax. Works for me.
 

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Take the plunge springs out, clean the tubes and parts that slide. The key is to get that sucker clean, I mean real clean..Then I use dry film graphite to lube the internals...
Works for me..
Good Luck.
George Cole
 

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I try to stay away from any lube. If you can take it apart, and clean and rub out the columns with polish, sparingly, it works well also. The springs on my router are the only thing that has lube, and that is a grease put in at the factory, and i haven't removed it. Its used for hand held. I am not sure of the other plunge, It Hans,t needed anything, as of yet.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Take the plunge springs out, clean the tubes and parts that slide. The key is to get that sucker clean, I mean real clean..Then I use dry film graphite to lube the internals...
Works for me..
Good Luck.
George Cole
Hi George:

Thanks. do you have a brand name for the graphite or a supplier?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I try to stay away from any lube. If you can take it apart, and clean and rub out the columns with polish, sparingly, it works well also. The springs on my router are the only thing that has lube, and that is a grease put in at the factory, and i haven't removed it. Its used for hand held. I am not sure of the other plunge, It Hans,t needed anything, as of yet.
Hi Howard:

Which polish? On my bikes I use a thin film teflon but I haven't been able to find it for years.

Thanks for the contribution.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
You definitely want to use a dry lubricant. I have had pretty good success with using past wax on the columns. Regardless of what you use, sawdust will conspire to break it down over time and repeated lubes will be necessary. I always disassemble, blow out the debris and re-wax. Works for me.
Hi Frank:

paste wax as in Johnson's floor wax or do you have something else in mind?

Thanks for the input.
 

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But Harry

You don't use that router upside down,most routers are not made to be use upside down :), most router have a small ring around the tubes right at the housing to keep the dust out of the housing but they don't deep it all out and it will build up at that point and jam it in time .

At that point if you wash it out and blow it out and relube it with dry lube,like DuPont lube (Teflon lube) many sale the same lube for router bits.
The Teflon fills the SMALL pin holes in the tubes and seals them up,and helps help the dust out but any time you use the router upside down you will have errors in the tubes in time..

=========

Ron, whenever the plunge starts to tighten I dismantle the router, give everything a thorough clean and rub in the minutest amount of CRC then reassemble. Normally I would do my own repairs, but as my main two routers are made by MAKITA, repairs are seldom required in spite of my heavy usage. The only improvements to my routers has been making a six step depth of cut adjuster which makes deep plunge routing in 4mm steps a breeze. Then there was the external light, later changed to an illuminated base which is literally "brilliant". I blow compressed air through the routers regularly.
 

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Hi Frank:

paste wax as in Johnson's floor wax or do you have something else in mind?

Thanks for the input.
Yeah, that'll do...I'll even use car wax in a pinch. :laugh:
 

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Sorry guys, perhaps If I'd called it WD40 you would all have recognised it immediately. Like all of us, I detail things that work for ME.
 

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Harry

WD40 is a dust magnet :(

============

Sorry guys, perhaps If I'd called it WD40 you would all have recognised it immediately. Like all of us, I detail things that work for ME.
 

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Bob, I always say to use "a minute amount" and because I have never had a problem with using it, in fact on the contrary, I find it to be every bit as useful as sliced bread. I wonder if magnetic forces in the northern hemisphere are different to here downunder, because of the fact that I don't have the problem.
 

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Harry, inquiring minds want to know.
What does "CRC" stand for?????????
I know what "CRS" stands for, but "CRC"?
 

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Hi George:

Thanks. do you have a brand name for the graphite or a supplier?
Ron,

The product is called "Dri Slide" It was a "gift" from my former employer..(Delta Airlines) we used it in the turbine section of jet engines..

However when my stash is gone I will go to Kano.com and order: Dryphite or Molyfilm..What were looking for here is a product that lays down a slippery film that is dry and opposes dust while making the contact surfaces slippery a owl s**t..

Works for me..

George Cole
"Regulae Stultis Sunt"
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Sorry guys, perhaps If I'd called it WD40 you would all have recognised it immediately. Like all of us, I detail things that work for ME.
All right Harry:

I blinked and read your treatise. I tried laughing but it hurt too much -- I'm still recovering from hospital. I note that it was a memo to your wife. Now, how much of this is urban myth ;-? WD-40 is fish oil??? That still doesn't explain CRC????
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Hi George:

Ron,

The product is called "Dri Slide" It was a "gift" from my former employer..(Delta Airlines) we used it in the turbine section of jet engines..

However when my stash is gone I will go to Kano.com and order: Dryphite or Molyfilm..What were looking for here is a product that lays down a slippery film that is dry and opposes dust while making the contact surfaces slippery a owl s**t..

Works for me..

George Cole
"Regulae Stultis Sunt"
I note that "owl s**t" is a measurement of slipperiness that I'm not familiar with.:D However, I will search out and see if I can get "dri slide' or "molyfilm" locally.

Thanks George. BTW, "Regulae Stultis Sunt" == very interesting philosophy sort of "responsible democracy"
 
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