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I have been reading the posts people have written about router tables. All were interesting and informative, but I would like to narrow it down for some comments and advice. I have about 5 routers or various brands, sizes, types, and ages. I have an old Sears Craftsman table, which will hold a router in place and that's about it. In all my research, I have narrowed my choices of a compete router table system to three. These are complete systems and not buying individual parts.

The three I have selected are the Woodpecker PRP-2, Infinity RTP-103 with a 3-1/4 HP Triton router, and the Jessum Rout-R-Lift II (either the Mast-R-Lift II Complete Table System or the Mast-R-Lift Excel II Table System). I would like to hear the pros and cons on each one. It seems that considering the overall price, there is not a great deal of difference in the costs. I have never had anything from Infinity or Jessum and everything I have from Woodpecker has been the best.

Help me out. Talk to me.
 

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anything from Jessem is top shelf and their CS/TS are next level outstanding...
 

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Router lifts are more accurate than through the base router adjustment, so I recommend either of the lifts, but some users don’t feel a need for the accuracy of the lift and are happy using through the base adjustment of their triton routers.

Don’t have any experience with the woodpecker lift, although I appreciate the quality of their other products. I have the master lift II and couldn’t be happier.


In woodworking there is always more then one way to accomplish something.
 

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Most of us have built our own both for cost reasons and to have the features that we feel are important to each of us. For example, all my recent tables have the router set closer to one side and I have it so that I can work from both sides with the router close to me for small pieces and farther away when I'm doing panels and need more support.

The Triton is an excellent table router that gets consistently high marks from its users. It has above the table adjustment capability as do many others these days. I use a Hitachi M12V2 and it has it also. The main difference between using one of those and a lift with router motor only is that you don't have to reach under the table to lock the router in position. Lifts are supposed to have a built in lock but there have been a few complaints about one or more creeping after being set. I just can't remember which ones.
 

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Theo
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Most of us have built our own both for cost reasons and to have the features that we
Exactly. Then you get the table you want, and not one someone else thinks you want.
 

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I have the Woodpecker table and lift and like it. However I think if you buy anything on your list you will be happy. IMO they are all top shelf.
 

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I've become a fan of the Incra positioner & fence, and after going through a few tables--wish i'd started with their table and fence set-up. With or without their fence set-up, Incra does a version of both the Jessem Mast-R-Lift (I have) and Woodpecker's PRL-V2 configured to accept their Magna-Lock rings. Quick change, and I especially appreciate the clean-sweep version of the rings as they really help with dust collection. Having used trim rings with little screws to change diameters, then twist-lock, the Magna-lock set-up is a great addition (as is the lift--even though I resisted spending the money for a lot of years...wish i'd done it sooner.) I've not used the Woodpeckers, but the Mast-R-Lift is excellent in both accuracy and ease of use for me.

As for the Incra positioner and fence--the biggest complaint I read from others is the footprint as the positioner extends off the back of the table. I use a 17" on one table and a 25" on another, and when they are extended the rail does stick out. That said, the vast majority of the time i'm using less than 4 or 5 inches of travel, but when I do need to go farther I just roll the table out a bit and have plenty of room. Working in one stall of a garage--space is tight but I don't find the fence extension to be an issue unless I need to use more than normal, and then it's worth every bit of the space issue!!

Your mileage and needs may vary.
earl
 

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Most of us have built our own both for cost reasons and to have the features that we feel are important to each of us. For example, all my recent tables have the router set closer to one side and I have it so that I can work from both sides with the router close to me for small pieces and farther away when I'm doing panels and need more support.

The Triton is an excellent table router that gets consistently high marks from its users. It has above the table adjustment capability as do many others these days. I use a Hitachi M12V2 and it has it also. The main difference between using one of those and a lift with router motor only is that you don't have to reach under the table to lock the router in position. Lifts are supposed to have a built in lock but there have been a few complaints about one or more creeping after being set. I just can't remember which ones.
The Woodpecker lift has a lock.
 

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Theo
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The jessem lift has a lock as well. I have a Rockler lift that doesn’t have a lock, but there is an one-time adjustment you can make to keep it from creeping.


In woodworking there is always more then one way to accomplish something.
 

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My question is how many of your routers do you plan to use in your table?

Ok, more than one question.

How many are the same size in diameter?

I built my own table and have two routers installed in it. It works great. Currently there is a flush trim bit in one and a small round-over bit in the other.

When I don't need the routers, I simply lift the insert plate out (with router attached) and place a blank piece in their place. Now I have a work table. I forgot to mention it is adjustable height so I can raise or lower it as needed. :grin:

Good luck in your search.
Mike
 

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Theo
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When I don't need the routers, I simply lift the insert plate out (with router attached) and place a blank piece in their place.
My table is somewhat similar, except only one router at a time, don't put a blank piece in if the router is not being used - might steal that idea in the future tho. I make my router plates, so if all my routers die, I would have no issues at all with putting a router in with different holding holes. I'd just mark where the holes were, drill, and screw into place. That's the way I did it from the start, simple to do, and has worked fine ever since.
 

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Most of us have built our own both for cost reasons and to have the features that we feel are important to each of us. For example, all my recent tables have the router set closer to one side and I have it so that I can work from both sides with the router close to me for small pieces and farther away when I'm doing panels and need more support.

The Triton is an excellent table router that gets consistently high marks from its users. It has above the table adjustment capability as do many others these days. I use a Hitachi M12V2 and it has it also. The main difference between using one of those and a lift with router motor only is that you don't have to reach under the table to lock the router in position. Lifts are supposed to have a built in lock but there have been a few complaints about one or more creeping after being set. I just can't remember which ones.
Not mentioned as an option, but I have the Rockler table with BenchDog lift (now manufactured by Rockler). It has both a means for adjusting the backlash out of the feed screw and a lock - use of which is recommended to eliminate creep in use - which requires reaching under the table to loosen/tighten. Not a big router table user to this point, but find I'm using it more and have been very happy with it.
 

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Have a few of their tools. Extremely accurate and beautifully made. Big price tags though. They are made in a small shop in Ohio with some amazing milling machines. They have a regular line of things that are always available and then they do a series of "one time" tools where they gear up the machines to run a limited set of a particular item which when sold out may not be made again. I chatted with them a while at WWIA in 2014. Nice folks, beautiful craftsmanship. Their router table, fence, and lift system are, I think, the best on the market.
 

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My question is how many of your routers do you plan to use in your table?

Ok, more than one question.

How many are the same size in diameter?

I built my own table and have two routers installed in it. It works great. Currently there is a flush trim bit in one and a small round-over bit in the other.

When I don't need the routers, I simply lift the insert plate out (with router attached) and place a blank piece in their place. Now I have a work table. I forgot to mention it is adjustable height so I can raise or lower it as needed. :grin:

Good luck in your search.
Mike
Mike.... That Triton height crank looks longer than stock..
Is it ?? If so, where did you get it ??
 

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I had the Rockler lift and it drifted despite making the adjustment. I now have the Triton TRA001. Replaced my Rockler table plate with a Woodpecker plate that has a twist lock insert. Be sure to get the twist lock insert, much easier to change out to change bits. I like this combination a lot.
 
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