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This is new to me. Has any one tried them? They sound good but maybe they are to good to be true.
 

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I believe they were developed to attach stock to the spoil board of a CNC. Keeps the stock from moving or lifting, with no danger of harming the bit if one is cut through, and the advantage of no clamps above the surface of the stock. I do not know where else they may be used, but I'm sure that someone clever has figured out more uses.
 

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Steve what are they capable of penetrating?
 

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Should have known they will continue finding ways to make EVERYTHING out of plastic. And you know they will charge just as much, if not more and the profit margin will be huge! And everyone says they want to go green out there? HA! lol

That one link says doors, windows, cabinets, boat making...but I wouldn't trust it. You shift something too hard, I would think they would give way and break??
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Should have known they will continue finding ways to make EVERYTHING out of plastic. And you know they will charge just as much, if not more and the profit margin will be huge! And everyone says they want to go green out there? HA! lol

That one link says doors, windows, cabinets, boat making...but I wouldn't trust it. You shift something too hard, I would think they would give way and break??
I mostly use brad nails to hold wood in place while waiting for glue to dry or to put screws in. Very seldom do I use them and nothing else.
 
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I agree with you Don other than for attaching trim, as around a window. The plastic brads would never rust which is one plus. Because almost all paints are water based now any brads have a tendency to rust later.
 
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The composite nails started out before CNC for boat building. The held the epoxy layups in place until hardened. Not being metal made them able to remain after construction without risk of corrosion. In CNC you use them to hold the material down and then a rap sideways shears the nail. I had some and they really need the "correct" nailer, my attempts with a Porter Cable weren't as good.
Steve.

More info - https://raptornails.com/
 
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