Router Forums banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a router, but not an expensive festool with track.
And I have a Sheppach/Grizzly/.. track saw. So, I have router + guide rail.

This seems like a good start to me, all I need is to have the "piece between".

Hence my questions:
  • What are your experiences / examples with using a track saw guide rail for a router, if any ? (NOT including Festool or others that are "made for router x")
  • Is it possible to find technical drawings of the Scheppach/Grizzly guide rail somewhere ?

My idea, since I have access to aluminium and a large CNC work station, is to have a plate made that resembles the track saw bottom.
Then connect this plate to my router.
Should do it, right ?

My track: T24872 guide rail
My router: Bosch POF1200

PS: I guess my final result should be something like this.. but over $200 + shipping from USA + it only fits Festool anyway - then it's not acceptable.

There MUST be someone that has a DIY on cheaper / other guide rails.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,459 Posts
Hey, Torben; Bosch quotes p/n 1 609 203 M85 as being a "parallel guide"...I assume they mean the 'edge guide' shown in the product illustration(?).
Could you fabricate a similar device using two rods and a bar with a bottom groove to ride the rail? Bosch should be able to supply the rods as replacement parts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,896 Posts
Torben don't be fooled into thinking that you need this interface clamp, what did professionals do before it was invented? I have a Festool Rail that is 1500mm or so long and I can borrow a 3 mt rail and have it in my work area within ten minutes of thinking that I want to use it and I have the Festool OF1100 Router that goes with it, and I have the interface clamp that goes with it, however I rarely bolt it all up to get a straight cut, I did, and still do, run routers up against an aluminum straight edge by just resting the edge of the router against the firmly clamped straight edge and then I use a steady hand, and I get straight cut, I run laminate trimmers the same way to joint the edges of laminates prior to laying it down, how did wood turners turn wood before the power lathe? The used legs of iron and a pole lathe! It is also a bit like steam bending, you can buy the best steam box and gas kit to heat the water but how did Cabinetmakers, Boatmakers and Chairmakers steam bend a piece of wood in the time of Queen Anne when that type of steam box was not invented? How did they do it in the time of George the 3rd? Steam was used to bend wood in the time of Ancient Egypt, Ancient Vikings did it as well, and they bent wood with ease. I do use the Festool clamp to attach the OF1100 to a workshop made circle jig and that works very well but I do it that way as I already own the clamp and router, I would never buy that clamp just to use it on the circle jig. Rails and plunge saw do work quite well together so I also have the Sheppach plunge saw and its 1500 rail, that saw is not as expensive at the Festool plunge saw and rail, were I laying floors professionally then I would buy the Festool Plunge saw and rail but I just don't have to workload to make me invest in that very sweet saw, the thing is that to justify buying an expensive saw or router jig then you have to have work where you use it all the time, if you don't then there is always other ways to run a router and get a straight cut, you can bend wood with a wood burning fire and a home made wooden steam box as well. NGM
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys for your replies. I did get Bosch part [1 609 203 M85] with the machine, but it's not really of much use to me, since it's way too easy for the router to run away towards the edge. Maybe it's just me :)

@neville9999: possible, but I am not a professional, so think it would be a great help for me to be able to run along a rail, repeatable.

I think the microfence stuff looks real nice, but it's real expensive.

Guess I will just have to measure the track directly then. Technical drawings of such things are hard to come by I guess.
 

·
Official Greeter
Joined
·
18,847 Posts
Hi Torben, correct feed direction helps to hold the hard against the edge. It will move away if you feed right to left (hand held).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,896 Posts
Hi Torben, correct feed direction helps to hold the hard against the edge. It will move away if you feed right to left (hand held).
James I thought that my answer was very complete but you are correct as I left off the importance of the correct "feed direction" with hand held and general use of routers, if the wood is fraying then I sometimes feed in the wrong direction but I do it for that reason alone and I have always had a good grip, but if anyone does run a router free hand off a straight edge and it is creeping away then you are probably going in the wrong direction, NGM
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top