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Larry if you are a contractor and your time is valuable then I would say go for it but if not then stick with a corded one. Ryobi is in the same class as Skil and B & D quality wise but they have standardized their battery powered tools to all (or at least mostly) use all the same batteries and chargers so that means they'll probably be around for a while in case you have to replace them.
 

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Using one battery type in most of their tools is such a good idea for the end user that it is a wonder every company hasn't done it yet. I have a large back yard with lots of trimming work, and it's too far to haul a cable back there. So I've considered the Ryobe setup. But I wish the DeWalt tools had standardized batteries because in general, I don't think much of Ryobe engineering. But then again, you don't necessarily use the trim router for heavy work and it would be a convenience to not wrestle with a cord. I'd also make certain there are plenty of accessories, as there are for the DeWalt and Bosch. If you were to use if for signs, for example, you might want some special base. Let us know what you do and if you get it, please give us a review.
 

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Tom,

My neighbor just bought a Ryobi
set up ---- came home with weed wacker, hedge trimmer, and blower -- all run off the same base - - and it's gas powered. They got, I think, 3 other attachments that go with it. So far, he's had a ball playing with it. And it's a lot more poweful than the battery powered ones.
 

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Tom,

My neighbor just bought a Ryobi ...
and it's gas powered. They got, I think, 3 other attachments that go with it. So far, he's had a ball playing with it. And it's a lot more poweful than the battery powered ones.
A gas powered trim router. Hmmm. I think I want one.
 

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Using one battery type in most of their tools is such a good idea for the end user that it is a wonder every company hasn't done it yet.
They do Tom. The likes of Makita, DeWalt etc were doing it long before Ryobi. They have full ranges of tools using the same batteries, as do Bosch, Milwaukee etc. Although I think Ryobi are the first with a cordless router, some of the others' 18V LiIon ranges are probably still more comprehensive. Makita especially. They have all sorts using their 18V batteries - heated jackets, a coffee maker...
 

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A gas powered trim router. Hmmm. I think I want one.
You would be the one to catch that...LOL...I can just see it, a complete RC kit for a small RC plane engine-driven trim router...

Talk about SWMBO complainin' 'bout the noise...

:smile::surprise::laugh2:
 

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To bring this back to routers...I have had one of the Ryobi cordless trim routers for several years. It came as part of a kit, if not I probably would not have bought it.
Advantages:
- price,
- lightweight,
- I have a few of their tools and the common battery means that I always have several charged,
- easy to change bits.

Disadvantages:
- not very powerful - best for MDF and softwood
- no speed control (at least on mine) it is on or off

Conclusion, I won't get rid of it but it is not the reason I would switch to using Ryobi (the caulking gun, reciprocating saw are).
 

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To bring this back to routers...I have had one of the Ryobi cordless trim routers for several years. It came as part of a kit, if not I probably would not have bought it.
Advantages:
- price,
- lightweight,
- I have a few of their tools and the common battery means that I always have several charged,
- easy to change bits.

Disadvantages:
- not very powerful - best for MDF and softwood
- no speed control (at least on mine) it is on or off

Conclusion, I won't get rid of it but it is not the reason I would switch to using Ryobi (the caulking gun, reciprocating saw are).
Is yours a cordless router or is it a cordless cutout tool?

I've been waiting for the router to be released for sale and just now realizing it is now available.
 

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Gerard after I did some more looking I found Ryobi did have a model p600 on the market for a short time. The one they are selling now is the P601 and for a long time it was listed at Home Depot and on the Ryobi site but was not available for sale. I had a request with Ryobi to be notified when it was available but I guess they didn't send a notice or I overlooked it in my emails.

Of course I don't have mine yet but I planed on using it for round over bits, but I'll have to see what kind of power it has.
 

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I have found with cordless tools that most are under powered as compared to corded tools and the batteries don't last long enough to keep you going without having several charged and ready. the one advantage is in drill motors and screw guns are slow revolution tools which seem to out perform corded tools for driving screws , but not for drilling matals.
The battery Dremel is a good example of not performing as good as the corded one, each has their own place.
Just my 2 cents,

Herb
 

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Was just at HD and found the Ryobi...heavy for its size...kinda top heavy and clubby...kinda fat for my hand...then I noticed it didn't have a battery in it...don't think I'd go for it...but that's me...YMMV...
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I'm thinking that I may go for the Ridgid 18V Router. Don't like the that Battery and changer or extra .
 

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I use the Ryobi system for drill, saw, and hedge cutter with 2 of the small batteries. All very good tools and the batteries charge in about 45minutes. My son also has Ryobi drill and one of their cordless Air Bradders which fires nails up to 65mm length. All manufacturers (I think) who use the one battery system charge for the tool and if you need a battery you pay extra for that. That makes all subsequent tools quite cheap.
The thing to remember that when you buy your first tool and battery and charger you feel locked in to that system so select which supplier you want to go with. In the case of my saw I can only cut 45mm which limits it a bit. I know Makita will cut a full 2" at 90deg.
Going cordless is a dream. You can complete most jobs more quickly than rolling out cords and putting them away. It is the same result as between powered and cordless drills
 

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The thing to remember that when you buy your first tool and battery and charger you feel locked in to that system so select which supplier you want to go with. In the case of my saw I can only cut 45mm which limits it a bit. I know Makita will cut a full 2" at 90deg.
They even have an 18V one that will cut over 2-1/2" at 90° now.
Theirs is also the only range to include a cordless biscuit jointer (and it works great). DeWalt used to have one but it's out of production now I think.
 

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I have been considering a battery powered hedge trimmer. The boss of the house has several box hedges in front of the house, that are only a foot or so high. She insists, that, they be trimmed round. No matter how careful I am, the cord on the trimmer WILL eventually fall into the blade and get cut. I have spliced and re-work, so many cords that I probably could have paid for a battery powered trimmer.

@DesertRatTom I will agree to disagree with you on the Ryobi's. I find that they are more than adequate and reliable in a home shop/handyman environment. I would never use them in a professional capacity, but like them better then the DeWalt tools. Don't get me wrong, I like the DeWalts. I own a bunch of them. However, they are all packed away because I got tired of the overpriced, expensive batteries heading South every time you glanced at them sideways. I don't have that problem with my Ryobi LiIon batteries. Additionally, the Ryobi batteries seem to have longer run times, are more robust and less prone to damage and, at least subjectively, seem to be better balanced when in the tool(s). However, (hopefully) DeWalt has improved these shortcomings in the past decade. To each his own. I would love to pull my DeWalts back out of storage if only they would improve their power supply system.

As for the battery powered router. Why? I agree with Cherryville, unless you are a professional and don't always have access to an outlet, stick with a corded tool. The additional bulk is just not worth it. The cords on my routers never seem to be in my way. If they were, then there is probably something wrong with my set-up and I didn't think it through.

Gerard seems to have summed up the thoughts on the cordless router best. Unless you just have to have a unique tool, or have a specific need, I would pass on the router.
 

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Bill and Murray, I'm with you on the Ryobi's. I have several 18v, and they handle wood well and hold charges. I also have the 40v Lawnmower and the 40v power head with an edger, and weed wacker. The 5AH battery cuts my lawn using between 25 and 50% of the charge. The power head barely dents the charge going around after mowing. Sure beats messing with gas.
 

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In response to an earlier question, I have both the cordless router and the cutout tool, my comments are about the router.

It is the older (blue) router.

I have not experienced any issue with the battery life on any of my 18v Ryobi tools. Some, however are better adapted than others. The drills, reciprocating saw, jigsaw, vacuum, are all good. The circular saw is better with a Freud blade, but still nothing to write home about ( in fairness my go to circular saw is a 15amp worm drive Skill saw).

On the 40v tools I have a half acre and have not needed to use the second battery. I do not let the lawn get too long or I cut it higher and then do another cut in a few days. Only a 2 stroke would deal with my lawn when it gets really long. The 40v trimmer and brush cutter are also good.

Ryobi, Milwaukee and others make battery powered tools that rival corded ones. A few years back, they were not worth considering. Now they are.
 

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I check out the router at Home Depot after a doctors appointment on Friday. The depth adjustment on the floor unit was really tight, I think the clamp needed to be adjusted. It does have a quick release for the height which is nice. I do wish it was variable speed but I can live with that so I guess that will be in my shop pretty soon.

I do have several of the other 18v tools, 6 1/2 circular saw, random orbital sander, cat sander, work light, handy vac, drill and chainsaw. Like them all!
 
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