Router Forums banner
1 - 20 of 32 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
i choose to have a corded router - Dewalt 625 - only because in my opinion as a DIYer it covered most possible needs , first being a worktop , sink cutout and groves in doors.
BUT - i am looking at the dewalt cordless 1/4" just for the occasional trimming, BUT cant justify the price at the moment
NOTE - I'm just a DIYer , so occasional use
 

·
Registered
Oliver (Prof. Henry)
Joined
·
2,253 Posts
If I could have only one, it would be corded. However, there are lots or reasons to own a cordless router, especially trim router size. Occasional job-site needs is one. Cordless trim routers are being embraced by sign carvers who make signs on-site at craft fairs, and don't want to have to deal with lugging around a generator.

With cordless tools now including everything from drills, to reciprocating saws, to miter saws, the cordless tool world is becoming more useful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
as was said here - if i could only have one i would have corded...but that is only cause there are no powerful 1/2 routers that are cordless....yet...
As many here i have several routers including a cordless trimmer. Its great for what it is - cord hassle free tool that i can run around the shop with.
I suspect that if i were in the trades - eg a framing person or someone involved in door fitting etc i would be more inclined towards cordless in general.
my bet is that someone will put out a bigger 1/2 cordless router soon....the battery tech is there

M
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Only 1?
Corded.

That by no means says I prefer a corded router.

I can't see a 3.5 hp cordless router that I can stick in a table like my Milwaukee 5625-20.

However - for small compact trim routers, the size of the DeWalt 611PK - I'm not sure I'll ever use my DeWalt ever again now that I have a cordless Makita.
The extra power the brushless 18V motor brings to the table is a game changer. It's every bit of 1.5hp.
Not having a cord to get hung up and drag the router to the side in the middle of a cut is another nice touch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,830 Posts
With cordless tools now including everything from drills, to reciprocating saws, to miter saws, the cordless tool world is becoming more useful.
Useful = expensive

I don't believe in my lifetime tools powered by battery's will reach the quality of a tool powered by an ac corded tool. If they were I would be cordless assuming the longevity and cost of the battery(s) were within reason. Also a battery powered tool operates differently when fully charged compared to 50/75%.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Also a battery powered tool operates differently when fully charged compared to 50/75%.
I have not noticed that with my cordless tools , ONLY a DIYer , but do have a cordless Grinder which uses a lot of power and batteries do not last , but it works pretty much full on until the batter stops completely , same with my Multitool and with all my other cordless tools , drills/driver and circular/jig saws and planner
Some are Brushless but a few are not.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Useful = expensive

I don't believe in my lifetime tools powered by battery's will reach the quality of a tool powered by an ac corded tool. If they were I would be cordless assuming the longevity and cost of the battery(s) were within reason. Also a battery powered tool operates differently when fully charged compared to 50/75%.
@Marco that is indeed a bold statement - considering how fast battery technology is advancing (driven mostly by electric vehicles and consumer electronics)

I can say from my point of view - cordless is ALREADY better! the performance of cordless tools when the battery is above 25% is on par with corded, while charging times are really really short nowadays... and of course - they dont have a cord.

Can you even imagine going back to a corded impact driver or combi drill????

All the cordless tools I have i am very happy with and the comfort of not having a cord, especially outdoors when working construction (I do some pergolas and deck work) is great.

All you need is a bucket full of batteries and at least two chargers (or a double headed one)

YMMV etc
M
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
826 Posts
There are still a lot of corded tools being used outside construction.

When battery operated nailers came out they weren't very good. I used Paslode.

Batteries are heavy. Small routers with a battery is heavy. Even amid size router with a battery is heavy. Drills today with large batteries are heavy. ..

I've used a cord in commercial for a long time. Doesn't bother me.

People don't like dragging a cord around. They make ot sound like there dragging a 10 guage cord around, a water hose or a large air line...

I worked in large buildings where a 100 ft was needed. Most here are working in a garage and 25 ft of cord is all that's needed. This is why cabinet and commercial shops set up rows of cabinets , go down one line move cord to the next.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
The Makita can use the small 1.5 AH battery which adds very little weight to the tool. Not anywhere enough to cause unbalance.
& with today's LiIon batteries, they are both lighter and deliver far more power than the old NiCad.
Admittedly = the 3.0 & 5.0 AH batteries are larger & do add weight to the top - the vast majority of the jobs I do with it don't require a lot of run time.

I don't have as much of a problem dragging a cord around on a job site as I do having a cord available to use!
It seems like everyone needs or wants electricity on a site at the same time. A lot of the times the only power on a site is what a single Honda 2200 (with a single 20amp outlet) can supply.

Re: a 1.5 hp "trim router". The Makita compact is a 1/4" collet & can do anything physically larger routers can do with 1/4" bits.
I love mine & wouldn't part with it.

I don't believe cordless is ready to replace corded for everything though - which is what I mentioned above.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
826 Posts
The Makita can use the small 1.5 AH battery which adds very little weight to the tool. Not anywhere enough to cause unbalance.
& with today's LiIon batteries, they are both lighter and deliver far more power than the old NiCad.
Admittedly = the 3.0 & 5.0 AH batteries are larger & do add weight to the top - the vast majority of the jobs I do with it don't require a lot of run time.

I don't have as much of a problem dragging a cord around on a job site as I do having a cord available to use!
It seems like everyone needs or wants electricity on a site at the same time. A lot of the times the only power on a site is what a single Honda 2200 (with a single 20amp outlet) can supply.

Re: a 1.5 hp "trim router". The Makita compact is a 1/4" collet & can do anything physically larger routers can do with 1/4" bits.
I love mine & wouldn't part with it.

I don't believe cordless is ready to replace corded for everything though - which is what I mentioned above.

Why would you be on jobsite with a cordless router using a gereator? I was an installer for numerous years installing residential and commecial.. 7 years at Regency Cabinets, 2 years Blystone cabinets and 7 years at Steve Rays commercial shop...

I did all the installing...

There are always Temps on those sites.
 

·
Registered
Oliver (Prof. Henry)
Joined
·
2,253 Posts
I recently purchased battery-operated 16 and 18 ga brad nailers and felt like I had died and gone to heaven. It is very convenient when I want to use a few brad nails to hold a project together. It beats having to drag out the compressor, fire it up, and wait until it noisily reaches full pressure. I also no longer have to work around where the air hose wants to drag around the shop and project. They are also handy for doing a little trim work in house remodeling projects.

Would it be a solution for someone needing all-day nailing capabilities? Of course not. But for my use, it’s great to just pick up the nailer and be ready to go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Which nailer did you get, i have been looking as a DIYer for a cheap solution , but A) expensive and B) some of the staple/nail versions left a Staple indent when nailing, I wanted for a few projects exactly like you - based in UK
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
826 Posts
I did home renovations. A lot of times the power is cut off & work has to go on.
Even with a bunch of 18V batteries, they do need charged every now and then,
I did rehabs in Independence , Mo. For Jodi Petterson . Many ex drug houses. First thing we did was establish power....

I'm still lost on why I would be doing router work..

Batteries have to be charged..We've run generators on house the city required an updated power service. After that power is a established...

On cabinet installs batteries were pretty nice. Over the years batteries got heavier.. starting with old slimline Makita. When I ended my career it was with makita. I have Milwaukee and Dewalt now, but if I upgrade it will be Makita. That being said you will not catch a cordless router in my shop.

I sold all my Paslodes as well..

I will add....I do find a cordless jigsaw useful......
 

·
Registered
Oliver (Prof. Henry)
Joined
·
2,253 Posts
Which nailer did you get, i have been looking as a DIYer for a cheap solution , but A) expensive and B) some of the staple/nail versions left a Staple indent when nailing, I wanted for a few projects exactly like you - based in UK
I bought the Ryobi nailers from around Christmas time from Home Depot when they were having deals, including extra batteries at about half price. Since I already had a Ryobi impact driver, I figured it was a no brainer.
 
  • Like
Reactions: etaf

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
I'm still lost on why I would be doing router work..
There's plenty to route on a house rehab.
Matching existing trim for instance.
I bought a Ryobi set of 1/4" router bits that I've been using a couple of dozen years now.
With it, I'm able to come close enough to most existing profiles it's hard to tell them apart from a distance.
Old 1950s/1960s Birch plywood panel/Pine rails and stiles cabinet doors all have a round over on them that needs to be done if/when a door is replaced.
On most rehabs we do, we try to salvage what's already there & add on to it where needed.
Building carcasses on site is a lot easier when you have a router onsite to make the shelf pin holes.

Anyhow - I find plenty of uses & if you don't, then more power to you.

I'll make sure I let Santa know not to bring you one for your stocking.
 
1 - 20 of 32 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top