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Hi All,pretty sure I could make a corner spline Jig but it wouldn't look real nice being made out of bits & pieces of scrap. So I want to build one out of 1/2 inch ply & paint it so it looks like I take a little pride in my work Can some body direct me to a plan for this Jig I'd appreciate your help.Thank you,Jamesjj
 

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Hi All,pretty sure I could make a corner spline Jig but it wouldn't look real nice being made out of bits & pieces of scrap. So I want to build one out of 1/2 inch ply & paint it so it looks like I take a little pride in my work Can some body direct me to a plan for this Jig I'd appreciate your help.Thank you,Jamesjj
Why go to heaps of trouble James when it's as quick, easy and safe as shown.
 

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I made this one without a plan, but most of these jigs use a similar design. This one is used for picture frames, so the backer board is movable. There are two bars that run in the miter slots. The movable backing allows fine placement of the spline in the corner of the frame, which is usually no more then 1 1/2 inch so precise placement is nice. The large backer makes it easy to clamp the frame in place. On my router table, I would alter this so the miter bars ran in the table's miter slots and the center of the jig lined up with the bit. This jig is made of 3/4 ply for the base, but the sliding part is 1/2 Baltic Birch.

How I'd modify this design for a router table: I'd make the base out of half inch ply set at the same 90 degree angle. But I'd cut out the center of the sled so I could drop in some 1/4 ply or mdf. This because you will have to change the bits and might even use a dovetail bit, so the replacable 1/4 inch piece acts as a zero clearance, anti-tearout piece.

I've seen numerous jig designs like this one. The most important thing to me was using an accurate draftsman's triangle to check angles. To make the V shape in the base, I simply set the saw to a precise 45 degrees, cut the 3/4 I used in half and applied glue while holding the triangle in place. Once the glue set it was perfect. There are two support pieces under the 45s that were cut the same way (Thank the lord for Wixey digital angle gauges). I used the triangle to work out the placement of the support pieces. So all the perfect 45 degree cuts support each other.

I cut a dado in the back part of the V for a Tslot and installed a T Track so I can easily lock down the vertical support. Make sure you cut all the parts with your saw set at exactly 90 degrees so it assembles sauare (Wixey again). You can see the slot where the blade goes throuh, that's where I'd cut out a wider opening for use on a router table.

It took several hours to figure out and then make this jig. It is solid and has a shelf set aside where it lives between uses.
 

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Mine is very much like Tom's above. Most of my jigs and fixtures are made from 3/4 cabinet birch plywood, Apple Ply or Baltic Birch. I don't ever paint any of my jigs because I don't want any paint getting on my project parts, not even small rub marks. At most, my jigs might get some clear polyurethane, but most are just left as bare plywood, or sometimes waxed with Johnson's Paste Wax.

To store them, a 1" hole is bored through most of them near one edge, so I can hang them from hooks in my shop ceiling. They are out of the way there, and yet easy to find the next time that I need one of them, but I'm rapidly running out of ceiling space.

Charley
 

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I have a hard to access corner in my shop where I've put in 2foot wide shelves (some 2x2, others 2x4 ft.) where I keep most of my jigs. I have waxed a couple but most are left bare. I'm more likely to wax the wood miter bars than the rest of the jig. Really love those jigs!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I made this one without a plan, but most of these jigs use a similar design. This one is used for picture frames, so the backer board is movable. There are two bars that run in the miter slots. The movable backing allows fine placement of the spline in the corner of the frame, which is usually no more then 1 1/2 inch so precise placement is nice. The large backer makes it easy to clamp the frame in place. On my router table, I would alter this so the miter bars ran in the table's miter slots and the center of the jig lined up with the bit. This jig is made of 3/4 ply for the base, but the sliding part is 1/2 Baltic Birch.

How I'd modify this design for a router table: I'd make the base out of half inch ply set at the same 90 degree angle. But I'd cut out the center of the sled so I could drop in some 1/4 ply or mdf. This because you will have to change the bits and might even use a dovetail bit, so the replacable 1/4 inch piece acts as a zero clearance, anti-tearout piece.

I've seen numerous jig designs like this one. The most important thing to me was using an accurate draftsman's triangle to check angles. To make the V shape in the base, I simply set the saw to a precise 45 degrees, cut the 3/4 I used in half and applied glue while holding the triangle in place. Once the glue set it was perfect. There are two support pieces under the 45s that were cut the same way (Thank the lord for Wixey digital angle gauges). I used the triangle to work out the placement of the support pieces. So all the perfect 45 degree cuts support each other.

I cut a dado in the back part of the V for a Tslot and installed a T Track so I can easily lock down the vertical support. Make sure you cut all the parts with your saw set at exactly 90 degrees so it assembles sauare (Wixey again). You can see the slot where the blade goes throuh, that's where I'd cut out a wider opening for use on a router table.

It took several hours to figure out and then make this jig. It is solid and has a shelf set aside where it lives between uses.
Harrysin Harry,the box in the picture is similar to the one I'm making.Finally procured some 3/4"Western Red Cedar for the job.Will "Aquadhere"glue be OK for WRC?.Thanks Harry, Jamesjj
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Why go to heaps of trouble James when it's as quick, easy and safe as shown.
Thanks to all for your help with the spline jig. My eyes are still a bit blurry from this mornings eye drops,so I will thank you all in one go before I make another mistake.Harry, Stick,Tom.Charley Much obliged,Jamesjj.
 

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Harrysin Harry,the box in the picture is similar to the one I'm making.Finally procured some 3/4"Western Red Cedar for the job.Will "Aquadhere"glue be OK for WRC?.Thanks Harry, Jamesjj
Tom,greqt idea the T slot.No need to clamp with that inclusion.
 

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Tom,greqt idea the T slot.No need to clamp with that inclusion.
I still have to clamp the frame to the trapezoid backing. But it's nice to have that vertical piece nice and solid. And making the jig fairly wide allows me to use it on fairly wide boxes as well. If I were to use it on a router table, I'd make a new one with the big cutout I mentioned.
 

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Harrysin Harry,the box in the picture is similar to the one I'm making.Finally procured some 3/4"Western Red Cedar for the job.Will "Aquadhere"glue be OK for WRC?.Thanks Harry, Jamesjj
I only use Aquadhere for things that need a reasonably long setting time and strength is not a problem. The rest of the time I use Weldbond made in Canada and sold all over the place including Bunnings.
 

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I can take a hint,Thanks Harry,Weldbond it is.Jamesjj
 
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