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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Recently upgraded from a trim router to a full size one, the Hitachi/Metabo KM12VC which has been really nice to work with. I was recently "jointing" the edges of some 1.5" thick butcherblock countertops by running the router along a straight edge. I had a few questions:
1. I did a couple of passes so as not to remove the entire depth all at once. I've read about making multiple passes rather than taking all the material at once. Does this apply to depth as well as how wide of a path you are removing? I figured the more bit making contact, the more power needed. Also didn't know if there were any ways of determining how much to take off based on HP, bit size, etc.
2. When I did the second pass (basically taking off the bottom half of the thickness) it left a little ridge, and the lower portion was proud of the first pass/top portion. Is this common? I made sure to push all the way against the straightedge, but I couldn't make a difference. It was very consistent and a very neat line, also a very small difference in material, but I couldn't figure out what had changed.
3. For one of the passes, I had a certain side of the router towards me (happened to be the one with the logo). Got everything flush. Then I needed to clean one area up, but happened to turn the router around, so the locking mechanism was facing me. This time, it took off more material! I tried a couple different ways, and it kept seeming to happen, and I could definitely tell it was happening by the sound. I'm guessing the bit sits closer to one side than the other. Is this typical? Didn't see any way to adjust this, so thought I would just need to be consistent, since I hadn't really thought of it as having "sides" before.

Thanks for the help and all the inspiration around here!
 

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Confused a little Bcemail, Jointing countertops? are they already installed?

But moving on you need to make sure your bit is centered. If it is then I would suspect the straight edge is moving.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Confused a little Bcemail, Jointing countertops? are they already installed?

But moving on you need to make sure your bit is centered. If it is then I would suspect the straight edge is moving.
Sorry, I see how that's confusing. I'm using two sections to make an island top, and the edges weren't true. I don't have a plane to use so went with the router.
For centering, is the problem usually the bit not centered in the collet? Didn't know that could be a problem since it just seems to center itself as I tighten down. Or can the collet or other part be not centered on the router?
Thanks!
 

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Paul
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The baseplate might be out. A 'centering cone' can help adjust it OR use the same side against the guide. Another way would be to make a final 'skim' the full height (just enough to take out the marks left behind). A centering cone is also very handy for guide bushing use.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The baseplate might be out. A 'centering cone' can help adjust it OR use the same side against the guide. Another way would be to make a final 'skim' the full height (just enough to take out the marks left behind). A centering cone is also very handy for guide bushing use.
Thanks! I ended up doing one final pass moving my straightedge as little as possible. Was just worried I might move it out of line or something but seemed to work.
I'll check out the centering cone. Something came with the router that looks like it's for centering but I thought it was for the guide bushings. Looks more like a pointy bit
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·

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Pix is of a conventional centering cone.
396163

You can use a split fence to joint the edge of a crooked piece. You add a spacer behind the outfeed side of the fence, then run the piece through. It will take off the amount of the thickness of the offset of the fence. For a crooked piece you put the concave curve toward the bit. After a few passes, the edge will become straight, at which point you can put the flat side against your table saw fence and cut off the convex part.
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For other wood defects, or reducing thickness, as with the slab shown, you can use your router to flatten the surface by making a jig and placing two side rails beside your work piece and place your jig across the side rails. You can use small wedges to stabilize the piece and then with a large, flat bit, run the router back and forth until you have a nice, flat side.

396166
 

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