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Frank
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No, I have not seen this before. I have one of these, but really have not turned a project. I started to learn to use it, but another project got in the way. It is hanging on the wall with a block of walnut ready to start again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm going to have to decide which router I will use and use it alone till I understand it's functions can then maybe I can combine both units.
 

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I regularly use one of these to make walking sticks - sometimes just plain tapered, and sometimes with a twist pattern.
I have no idea how you would combine 2 units, nor why you would want to. Possibly to make duplicate twist patterns? For most of the process of stick making, the router is not engaged with the indexed head, but just slides back and forth on the rail, by hand pressure. But I'm curious to see your intentions.
Rob
 

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Mike
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You can design the mantle legs so they have a joint in the center that is hidden in the design.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Anybody
I regularly use one of these to make walking sticks - sometimes just plain tapered, and sometimes with a twist pattern.
I have no idea how you would combine 2 units, nor why you would want to. Possibly to make duplicate twist patterns? For most of the process of stick making, the router is not engaged with the indexed head, but just slides back and forth on the rail, by hand pressure. But I'm curious to see your intentions.
Rob
DI'd you have to drill holes in the plate for a router?
 

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Interesting tool. I never seen one of these before. Please keep us (me) posted on how well it works.
 

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Hi Rebelwork Woodworking

Sorry for the "Rob" above read wrong message for name.


Further to the detail previously, only the top two rails are critical for dia, and only those two need the all thread supports.
You would need a new cable for the double length, connected to the existing tensioning spring.
The cabling system is similar to a parallel drawing board.
Regards
John L
 

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Ross
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Hi Jack, I have a Vermont American version of that machine, have had it 40 years, but used it very little after I bought a lathe. I do intend to use it again sometime.
You will in theory be able to do what you have in mind (based on your images), but bear the following in mind:
1. John Lennon's idea for joining the tubes is good, but you will not be able to use the tube supports or the grub screws he suggests, as they will block the travel of the router carriage. Either use much longer internal connectors (if you can find a stiff push-fit), or replace the tubes with longer ones (perhaps of greater wall thickness, so you do not get sagging in the middle, if you are using a heavier router). Theoretically, you need not confine yourself to double the between-centres length either - why not 2 1/2 or 3? But I cannot speak to the practicality.
2. I don't know about drawing boards, but the cabling system is designed to move the router carriage laterally in a fixed ratio to a number of turns, to get the spiralling effect. To achieve this, the cable winds and unwinds around a plastic drum at the "headstock" end. The cable is fixed to the drum at its midpoint. I very much doubt that there is enough room on the drum for a much longer cable. Extending the cable by splicing at the tensioning spring would therefore not increase the router carriage travel.
3. All is not lost:
a. The carriage can be disconnected from the cable. This is how one turns round posts from square stock, moving the router (on the carriage) along by hand, flattening the corners first. Thereafter with someone else rotating the handle at the "headstock" - perhaps you could even fit a small geared motor with foot control. Caution: I am not sure whether the finish of the turning will be to your requirements. Extensive sanding may be necessary to remove ridges left by the bit.
b. The tailstock can be offset, to create a linearly-tapered column.
b. The headstock has an indexing feature, which would allow you to rotate the workpiece in fixed increments, and lock it in place, so that you could slide the router and carriage by hand, with a veining bit, to do the reeding/fluting. ~~Be aware that the point of the bit does not travel straight up and down - it travels in an arc, centred on the rear tube. The slight asymmetry of the sides of a V-groove may not matter, unless the cut is deep. Your client probably will not notice, but you will.
c. If you first make a plywood or hardboard template of the cross-sectional view of the posts or columns, you can make fairly exact replica posts, as the router carriage has a follower which rides on the edge of the template (which attaches to the front of the frame.The template would be necessary if you plan on fluting a non-linearly tapered column, otherwise the router will cut to the same depth from the centre of the workpiece (not the surface), and ruin your work. If you offset the tailstock, as in b. above, the template is not necessary for fluting.

I have limited myself to making pieces which are glued together, but in principle your idea should work - a bit laborious, but not many people have access to a lathe with a bed length of the size you want.
I had to drill at least one mounting hole, as the only router I had when I bought the crafter, was a Hitachi M8, which had a base with no holes at all.

Do you have the manual for that machine? I have a ratty Craftsman pdf at hand, and could probably find my original somewhere.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Becausd I have two, I can easily keep one and manipulate the other. All I need is the rods. I don't need a cabling system to make a column...
 

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Biagio make good point about the back support rod, but you will need a centre support of some description, even if it is a removable temp support. As the weight of the router will cause the rods to dip over that distance.
I'm pretty sure that would not be ideal.
Regards JL
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I've pulled one bar out. I may have to take it to hardware stores to get an exact fit..
 

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Has anyone ever heard or seen two these put together to make one?
View attachment 400426
View attachment 400427
Sir,
Save yourself some time. I once had a project requiring a 2 long columns, with turnings and included fluting. I purchased a used router crafter from ebay and tried ajoining the 2 units and experienced sagging. Also, in order to use the cable again, I had to disassemble the duo and re-string the cable. A real pain with much frustration. My plan B was to turn 2 identical posts on 1 crafter and join the 2 halves to make 1 column. I successfully did so, by using a wooden dowel in the center for joint support (using epoxy for a faster assembly). I then cleaned up the splice with hand sanding and applied stain and finish. with the need of 2 columns, I had to repeat the procedure for the other one. Good luck with your project!
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I'm finding 1 or 2 bars 48" long. Menards had aluminum 96" long. Originals are 44.5. 8m tempted to get the 4 pieces of aluminum.
 
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