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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello - I have an old Craftsman 315.25060 router that I use very occasionally, but now need for a fairly ambitious project (making about 80 slots/pockets). Putting aside whether I'll be successful with this tool, I think a part is missing and I'll need to replace it or get a new tool. I've also looked at the manual, and don't see a reference to what's missing.

As I remember there is a cone shaped 'collar' that fits inside the threaded shaft to allow bits to be exchanged and tightened into place, there is nothing in the shaft, there might have also been a nut (it's probably been 10 years since I've used the router, but seem to remember it having all the parts). I included a couple pics.

So, is this something that can still be obtained? The 'Craftsman' support site seems based on part numbers and as I said, I don't see this part in the diagram. Is this a generic item that might work with other routers? Finally, I seem to mostly have 1/4" shaft bits and was going to buy another, but the threaded shaft of the router seems large enough to accept larger shafts, possibly with a different collar?

As you can tell, my knowledge of this tool is slipping, any help you can give would be appreciated. Thanks - Bruce
 

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Bruce, what you are missing is the collet/nut. The router shown is the 25070 which is very similar to yours. If you enlarge the second photo you will see the collet/nut installed. For the most part the collet/nut is unique to a particular router but there are some interchanges. The model you have is intended to work with 1/4" shank bits and is low hp. No advantage to using a larger shank in this model. You may not be able to order the collet/nut anymore except from an aftermarket place.
 

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Hey Bruce, welcome to the community...

Yep, that's an oldie but goodie ya got there. The collet and collet nut are the missing parts.
the Collet nut is Part #: 1-623792-03, and its no longer available.
the Collet is Parts #: 1-623791-01, also no longer available

Here a link to the exploded parts diagram. Your part is #44 & #45

http://www.searspartsdirect.com/model-number/31525060/0247/0740000.html

but going back and cross referencing the 3 digit prefix, it appears that Ryobi made that router for Craftsman. You might try following up with a Ryobi service center.
Might be alot more bother than its worth in the end. If a smallish router is what you like, give the DeWalt 611PK a look.

Hope this helped
 
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Hi Bruce and welcome. That router if it had a collet and nut would be worth at most $25 so if you have difficulties finding the parts or they are costly it won't be worth it.
 

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Hi Bruce. Welcome to our little corner of the 'net.

As others have mentioned, might be more bother than it's worth. However, one possible source might be Ebay or Craig's List, or another online sale source. You might find one that is broken in other ways that you could scavage for the parts that you need. I wouldn't waste a lot of time on it... newer and much better routers are available for a very reasonable price today.
 

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Hi, Bruce; welcome!
Seriously, if you value your time, invest in a new router. That one ( I still have my original Craftsman, like yours) is ancient, and seriously under-powered at 5/8 HP
A modern decent router would be in the 2+ HP range.
The one pictured looks like it's been through the wars. You can try and find the parts but there's no guarantee that it'll work properly even if you locate them.

A lot of us here like the Bosch 1617EVSPK, but it's by no means the only decent one out there. (Bill mentioned the DeWalt 611PK)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Wow! Thanks for all the input guys, Mike et. al. Nice welcome and good info, now that I know what I'm looking for I see Sears sells one, but it doesn't list my model, I suppose it might work? (oh, see I can't post a URL yet)

So if I can't find the part in the garage (or my wife can't, and she's pretty good), it looks like it would be about $20 with shipping to try the part.

Now may be the time for a better question, my goal is to create around 80 1/2" wide slots in 3/4" cherry plywood (around a foot, half under, half over). I planned on drilling a 1/2" hole in each end and routing between them with a flush cut bit, possibly two passes, first 1/4", then 1/2". Obviously a lot of work for me, the drill, the router, and the bit (oh, did I mention it's been around 100 almost every day).

As I said above I'm a pretty casual woodworker (I'm sure you couldn't tell), so even decent bits seem expensive, and this project has lots of pieces, thick cut glass, a welded caster base, and some doors that make this part seem easy. So is this router even up to the task of cutting almost 100' of slot? Anything special I should look for in a replacement (knowing it might not get used again until after I again loose the colett AND nut). I'll check out the suggestions above, especially like the idea of something used, sounds like I should be looking around 2HP? Is 1/4" shaft ok, that could use my existing bits, but I haven't bought bits for this project.

Ok, have at it ... really though, thanks for the help, suggestions, and warm welcome! - Bruce

Here's what I'm building (the slots are in the bottom and top) ...
 

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Drilling a hole and then trying to rout to a predetermined stop point will leave marks where the router bit takes over on possibly many of the grooves and certainly on a few. What is a better plan is to use a plunge router and use it for the whole groove using a down spiral straight bit from the top side or an up spiral from the backside. The up spiral clears chips better but I would want to try it on some scrap first to make sure that it didn't blow some grain out as it emerged through the front face.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Drilling a hole and then trying to rout to a predetermined stop point will leave marks where the router bit takes over on possibly many of the grooves and certainly on a few. What is a better plan is to use a plunge router and use it for the whole groove using a down spiral straight bit from the top side or an up spiral from the backside. The up spiral clears chips better but I would want to try it on some scrap first to make sure that it didn't blow some grain out as it emerged through the front face.
Thanks for your suggestion Chuck, it begs a question. I'd looked at spiral bits for the chip clearing quality, but it didn't seem you could get a 1/2" cut on a 1/4" shank (one of the reasons I was asking about shank size). It generally seems with a spiral bit that the cutting size is equal or less than the shank size? Am I looking in the wrong places? Or are you suggesting a slot template that I would follow around the edges?

I had thought by drilling a whole at each end I would have a slight buffer at the end point and wouldn't need a stop. By clamping a long board as a straight edge, or possibly two for a channel, I could cut 4 grooves with each setup. Though I'd like these to look nice the precision is not critical, they're just for air flow.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Ok, so found a used Porter-Cable 7529 on Craigslist for $40, said to be in good working condition. Around 2HP I think, could it handle this job? I looked at the Bosch and DeWalts mentioned, which are very nice (near or over $200?), but I suspect after this I'd have a nice router sitting on the shelf for a while.
 

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Ok, so found a used Porter-Cable 7529 on Craigslist for $40, said to be in good working condition. Around 2HP I think, could it handle this job? I looked at the Bosch and DeWalts mentioned, which are very nice (near or over $200?), but I suspect after this I'd have a nice router sitting on the shelf for a while.
First may I say I am not being sarcastic in my reply.
I looked at a parts supplier and noted that a very large amount of the parts are no longer available. This says to me that the router is obsolete and the condition it is now in is the way it will remain forever.
I think you might consider not taking on projects that require routing or seeing if there is someone available to assist you on that portion of the work.
Or you might consider getting a new, good router and doing more projects requiring routing. Only you and your situation will be able to make that determination.]
Again, no sarcasm intended.
 

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It would have enough power. The reason I said what I did is that drilling with a drill bit and routing with a router are two separate operations and to get both processes lined up precisely the same is very hard to do for a woodworker with average skills. The router is one operation with one machine so it is much easier. Normally spiral bits come with the same size shank as the flute size is and for 3/4 ply you should be using a 1/2" shank in my opinion. 1/4" will work but the bit is more fragile and the depth will need to get done in stages to be safe and you will also have to make a rotation around your jig rather than one pass.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
First may I say I am not being sarcastic in my reply.
I looked at a parts supplier and noted that a very large amount of the parts are no longer available. This says to me that the router is obsolete and the condition it is now in is the way it will remain forever.
I think you might consider not taking on projects that require routing or seeing if there is someone available to assist you on that portion of the work.
Or you might consider getting a new, good router and doing more projects requiring routing. Only you and your situation will be able to make that determination.]
Again, no sarcasm intended.
None taken, I appreciate your point. I look at it as spending $40 + the cost of a bit(s) to accomplish this part of this project, like the Craftsman I may then have another old router sitting around. If I go new I have ~$200 + bit(s) for the same thing, and then likely have a new router sitting around. My question here is whether this router would do what I need it to now.

I also appreciate that I'm in a router forum with people much more capable and serious than I; I'm usually in an audio forum and if you asked a parallel question there you might get an answer like "well, if you think you'll be happy with a soundbar then go for it, but I wouldn't do it" - I get it, I'm being cheap, but I appreciate the help. Finding more projects that require routing seems like an optimistic way to spend more money (which I'm not totally opposed to, I'm already spending plenty), but I build what I need, usually something related to audio or home theatre (as in this case). Music and audio are my hobbies, woodworking is something I do (enjoyably) to get exactly what I want. I do have a more capable woodworking friend who could help with this, but he's out of town for a couple months and I have to finish this project before ski season (my true love!). This is the most ambitious woodworking project I've ever undertaken.

There, have I personalized this enough *too much*, thanks again for the input. :smile:
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
It would have enough power. The reason I said what I did is that drilling with a drill bit and routing with a router are two separate operations and to get both processes lined up precisely the same is very hard to do for a woodworker with average skills. The router is one operation with one machine so it is much easier. Normally spiral bits come with the same size shank as the flute size is and for 3/4 ply you should be using a 1/2" shank in my opinion. 1/4" will work but the bit is more fragile and the depth will need to get done in stages to be safe and you will also have to make a rotation around your jig rather than one pass.
Thanks, now I have a better understanding of the bit and process. I have plenty of scrap wood to test on, but currently no router or (appropriate) bit.
 

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You raised a good point, Bruce. It was a given in our replies but we didn't address it directly.
You do not want to buy into a router that only accepts 1/4" shank bits. The Bosch routers, and likely most others new(?), come with both 1/2" and 1/4" collets.
Unless you need a 1/4" shank bit specifically, buy 1/2" shank bits. They're more robust, and easier to find in the types we've gotten used to.
Lee Valley Tools - Online Catalog
Unless you can find a like-new router at a distress or Estate sale, buy a new one! The warranty is important (Bosch customer service is excellent; that's one of the main reasons so many of us have them.)
I recently picked up a new set of 1/4" shank bits at 1/2 price. I'll probably only use about 3 or 4 of them but they're DIMAR, and at the price they were a steal.
I don't understand...same tool supply, different pricing!
https://www.kmstools.com/woodpecker-24pc-1-4-carbide-router-bit-set-5362


*I just went back and rechecked...they're different SKU numbers. Very strange???
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
Drilling a hole and then trying to rout to a predetermined stop point will leave marks where the router bit takes over on possibly many of the grooves and certainly on a few. What is a better plan is to use a plunge router and use it for the whole groove using a down spiral straight bit from the top side or an up spiral from the backside. ...
I get it now, I tried the two hole method and I see the problem. One hole improves things (by half), but I can also see the plunge is the way to go.

It would have enough power. The reason I said what I did is that drilling with a drill bit and routing with a router are two separate operations and to get both processes lined up precisely the same is very hard to do for a woodworker with average skills. The router is one operation with one machine so it is much easier. Normally spiral bits come with the same size shank as the flute size is and for 3/4 ply you should be using a 1/2" shank in my opinion. 1/4" will work but the bit is more fragile and the depth will need to get done in stages to be safe and you will also have to make a rotation around your jig rather than one pass.
I passed on the PC, a neighbor has loaned me a cheap 2HP fixed router that is letting me try some things, it does take multiple shanks up to 1/2", but he also gave me two flush cut bits I'm trying (nice neighbor).

You raised a good point, Bruce. It was a given in our replies but we didn't address it directly.
You do not want to buy into a router that only accepts 1/4" shank bits. The Bosch routers, and likely most others new(?), come with both 1/2" and 1/4" collets.
Unless you need a 1/4" shank bit specifically, buy 1/2" shank bits. They're more robust, and easier to find in the types we've gotten used to.
...
I now understand, the router I've borrowed accepts a 1/2" 'native' shank, and has collets for 3/8 and 1/4; I also have a 1/2" and 1/4" flush cut bit and the 1/2" is much more robust, though the 1/4" is brand new and carbide tipped (really good neighbor). I may now go buy a 1/2" downward spiral bit.

Thanks again to everyone for your very sound advice, I'm learning quite a bit here, and have started making progress on my project.
:smile:
 
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