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I made 2 of these a few years ago out of white pine. The holes were all laid out by hand & the rows were kept straight by sliding the top along a straight edge clamped to the drill press table. Because I was using a 15" drill press, I had to leave the 2 outside pieces off the top until after the drilling was complete. Otherwise, I would not have been able to drill to the center of the top. The center line of the bit on a 15" drill press is only 7.5" from the column. You can see the glue lines. I used brad point drill bits to keep nice clean holes.

https://www.routerforums.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=386219&thumb=1

https://www.routerforums.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=386221&thumb=1
 

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Theo
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Being in a table top, rather than a board that would be put away, looks like those holes could be Hell to keep cleaned out.
 
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Rick
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Great job Paul . Looks as good as any cnc could do
 

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I made 2 of these a few years ago out of white pine. The holes were all laid out by hand & the rows were kept straight by sliding the top along a straight edge clamped to the drill press table. Because I was using a 15" drill press, I had to leave the 2 outside pieces off the top until after the drilling was complete. Otherwise, I would not have been able to drill to the center of the top. The center line of the bit on a 15" drill press is only 7.5" from the column. You can see the glue lines. I used brad point drill bits to keep nice clean holes.

https://www.routerforums.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=386219&thumb=1

https://www.routerforums.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=386221&thumb=1
whew...
you have more patience than I've got...
you sure do nice work...

would a drill guide and cordless have been easier???
 

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Theo
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Vacuum cleaner,Theo.
No, that would not be Hell, I'm talking stuff sticking in the holes - like coffee, soda, or whatever a little kid could find to stuff (or pour) in. And a plastic or glass cover would not stand in a little kid's way, those little varmints can be very tricky.
 

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How about a thin second layer in the same wood, with an outside edge to hold it in place for when it's just being used as an ordinary table? Extend the edge the thickness of the cribbage top so it stays firmly in place. Or fashion some kind of latch or pins to keep the auxiliary top from tipping. I like the look of the table, a really nice project, well done.
 

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Mike
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Nice tables Paul. I like the choice of legs and stretchers they add character to the table.

I don't think I would have drilled all those holes freehand, I do know you can use drill stops and things like that but it is still a lot of work.
 

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I too have a radial drill press and it is the right tool for this item - you did an outstanding job, BTW. A glass top would show off the board and keep things clean - might just be a bother to lift it off, etc. but I'd suffer that before keeping it clean! If you done a recess in the top area of the holes, you might have been able to 'store' the glass during use underneath on the frame. Just sayin'...
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The heir who ended up with the family vacation cottage did not end up with the ownership of the cribbage board table which had always been a fixture in the cottage & held a lot of memories. Going forward, that table was an integral part of family get togethers, so a replacement was needed. I only had a couple photos to work from when I made the duplicate so I really have no idea how those holes were kept clean. Knowing how important the game of cribbage is around here, there were probably very strict family rules on keeping that table clean. Or, they had become very proficient at cleaning out those holes.
The new pegs were made from 1/4" dowels, so the drill bit for the holes was rigid enough to not wander. Plus, the tip grind on brad point HSS bits almost completely eliminates wander or chipping.
Once the grid for the holes was worked out, it was very accurately laid out on the table top. The X axis was determined by sliding the top along a straight edge clamped to the drill press table. Because the grid is centered on the table, after one line of holes is drilled, the table top is reversed for the comparable line on the other side. The next line on the X axis is set by moving the straight edge. The Y axis points are set by aligning the bit point with each cross line visually as the top is moved along the straight edge. The tiny point on the bit accurately aligns with the fine lines drawn on the grid. A little slow & tedious, yes, but accurate enough for this purpose.
 

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The heir who ended up with the family vacation cottage did not end up with the ownership of the cribbage board table which had always been a fixture in the cottage & held a lot of memories. Going forward, that table was an integral part of family get togethers, so a replacement was needed. I only had a couple photos to work from when I made the duplicate so I really have no idea how those holes were kept clean. Knowing how important the game of cribbage is around here, there were probably very strict family rules on keeping that table clean. Or, they had become very proficient at cleaning out those holes.
I dare say people were a lot cleaner back then - didn’t drag food all over the house eating in every room! And a vacuum was heard more often than it is today too...
 
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