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Day One:

I know my last piece almost made it to the fire pit. But I think this one I was working on for a current customer last night might be heading there for the 1st time since starting. Had a few chip outs on it. Losing a few tips of the stars. As the stars and inner borders are outset, While the red & blue areas of the Flag are inset areas. Was not going that deep either, because I like to do several shallow passes if I have to. And the bits were new bits. Guessing it must have been some bad grain areas. If it was a personal piece for myself, I would probably keep it as I did fix it for the most part. But since it is for a customer and it's a In Loving Memory Sign for his Son that passed. I am more than likely going to redo it. Ohhh The Woes....

Day Two:

Follow up on piece I had to do again due to chip out on some of the stars..Well this is strike 2 on this piece. Can't stress enough how disappointed I am for a 2nd time and in clear conscious can not deliver this sign to the customer yet. The customer had a license plate made up for Memory of his Son that passed and wanted me to make the same on a sign for him.Well last night I finished it for a 2nd time and it looked great. Painted it today, went to sand it off and could not believe the bleeding that happened. Even the black primer bled on me. Talked with Frank & Eric and think the problem may have been primer temperature along with the possibility of over spraying. Well let's hope there is not a strike 3.
 

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Bobby Lee,

Wood is not a perfect material to cut, carve, or rout. It also has it's own characteristics which makes it unique, including a little tear and chip out. Having a tube of wood filler handy saves many a project. If you have to, include, like Scottart does, a disclaimer about the individual qualities of wood, which makes each cut "unique". There will NOT be any two projects that look exactly alike. If somebody wants perfect and bland, than tell them to get molded plastic some place.

What you made is custom and personal, and minor flaws (which are noticeable probably only to you) make it more sentimental to the end user.

Don't get "sloppy", but don't be too hard on yourself, or you'll needlessly burn a lot of wood.

If you do a lot of painting than consider using something like Corafoam. It cuts as perfect as can be in one pass, is durable, and finishes great. But it has no grain and isn't cheap.

HJ
 

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Oliver (Prof. Henry)
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I agree with John's advice, Bobby Lee. You are creating a hand-made sign that is going to have a few imperfections — which is part of the charm of any art piece. If you want absolutely perfection buy a CNC and use something like the Corafoam John mentioned. That might give you a perfect looking product but it won't have a soul. The soul comes from the love and attention you give each of your signs. A few little wobbles adds to its authenticity.

Having said all that, here's another fix I've used in the past when the sign is painted: Paint over or around the mistake. It's like a woman reshaping her lips by applying lipstick outside the natural lines of her mouth. The secret is only revealed on close inspection. Most signs are viewed from a few away and reshaping the stars by painting the blue background around the star's chipout will make it look just fine.
 

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Bobby Lee,

Some woods will bleed worse than others and it looks like you found one of them. You can do a few small test pieces before you start a sign to see if the colors will bleed ( make sure you test all the colors you will be using.

You might want to seal the wood before adding the color. I would apply a few coats of shellac (make sure the entire sign has the same sheen), let it dry completely, then add your color. After every thing is dry add your final coats of finish.
 

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Maybe bleach will reduce impact of some of the bleed.
When you deliver a piece, keep your mouth shut. Do not point out every flaw. Here on the forum you are free to do so but never with the customer.

If your prices are below market, the sign as pictured is acceptable.
Or try a different technique as suggested and try again.
 
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If it was easy everyone would be making signs. :wink:

It seems like everyone is.


I agree with John's advice, Bobby Lee. You are creating a hand-made sign that is going to have a few imperfections — which is part of the charm of any art piece. If you want absolutely perfection buy a CNC and use something like the Corafoam John mentioned. That might give you a perfect looking product but it won't have a soul. The soul comes from the love and attention you give each of your signs. A few little wobbles adds to its authenticity. Quote - Ollie

Even CNC cuts aren't perfect. If the machine doesn't scew some little thing up, the nerd or operator will.

I don't see anything wrong with your sign!!!

HJ
 
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for the last time...

hand-made sign that is going to have a few imperfections — l

I don't see anything wrong with your sign!!!

HJ
those are character statements....
and I agree w/ you Tom...
 
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