Router Forums banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have rebuilt the table saw router table extension. 27" x 72". It's a blank slate; I can locate the router anywhere except where the cross members are - 24 and 48 from the ends. Once the router is located I plan on adding front-to-back 3/4" tracks and a cabinet under the table for table saw, router and thickness planer storage. Dust collection form underneath.
Questions:
  1. Any preference front to back? I'm thinking closer to the front to provide more clearance to the post behind the table - see pics.
  2. Any preference right to left? I'm thinking closer to the left to provide more (table saw) fence travel on the left of the router.
  3. Anything else to consider before cutting the router plate opening?
Thanks all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I have three objectives in replacing the older table extension:
1. A more stable table which could accept an insert for the Triton router. The older table had a non-standard insert which would not handle the Triton. I could not find a replacement insert that would fit the old table. You can see the older table in the background on pic #1.
2. A clear space to handle sliding dovetails for cabinets, bookshelves, etc. with longer sides.
3. The space under the extension is "free" space for a cabinet or shelves, storage for tools, blades, etc. for the table saw, the router and the thickness planer (located to the right of the table).

The table is 4" longer than its predecessor.

Any recommendations on where to locate the router insert?

Thanks Rebelwork.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
810 Posts
I use to do a lot of dovetail cabinetry. Where you want it, is really up to you. You know what you need to run or not. If your not towards the end you kinda get compressed on one side.

To me it's your call...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
I recently did something similar. I acquired jointech saw train rails and the cabinet maker clincher system. The rails are 8 feet long. It came with two jessem "rout r lifts" (the original old school ones that are about 14" x 12"). Aside from the odd size they work great. Anyway, I put one on the left side of my TS in a 24" wide extension and one on the longer 51" right side extention table starting about 5" from the saw top(I removed the extension wings). Because the positioner is only a one sided fence I wanted as much room to the right as possible. Which is similar to your thought process of maximizing fence travel. You may know this because of your previous extension but it took me a little while to get used to routing from behind, as opposed to standing directly in the middle of a router table perpendicular to the fence.i personally prefer to use the left extension router bc I can stand in the middle. Do you use your ts fence as a router fence or something else. Bc if your using your ts fence, your rails don't extend all the way right so the best option is probably where your template is in the photos, front to back I did exactly in the middle. This was mostly because my fence opens up for routing and I wanted the bit centered.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Perhaps some back story or context would clarify my questions. I have another router custom table built around a Woodpecker top and fence system mounted to be used from the "right" side of the table.
Wood Table Automotive tire Gas Engineering
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
I have rebuilt the table saw router table extension. 27" x 72". It's a blank slate; I can locate the router anywhere except where the cross members are - 24 and 48 from the ends. Once the router is located I plan on adding front-to-back 3/4" tracks and a cabinet under the table for table saw, router and thickness planer storage. Dust collection form underneath.
Questions:
  1. Any preference front to back? I'm thinking closer to the front to provide more clearance to the post behind the table - see pics.
  2. Any preference right to left? I'm thinking closer to the left to provide more (table saw) fence travel on the left of the router.
  3. Anything else to consider before cutting the router plate opening?
Thanks all.
I would first off make sure I had 24” clearance around the post before I positioned the router left-right. Any long work up to that width could be an issue otherwise. I have a 24” Incra to the right of mine. As far as front to back I’ve found it better an inch or two toward the front for support on intermediate length pieces on outfeed since I don’t need it standing in front.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
I have rebuilt the table saw router table extension. 27" x 72". It's a blank slate; I can locate the router anywhere except where the cross members are - 24 and 48 from the ends. Once the router is located I plan on adding front-to-back 3/4" tracks and a cabinet under the table for table saw, router and thickness planer storage. Dust collection form underneath.
Questions:
  1. Any preference front to back? I'm thinking closer to the front to provide more clearance to the post behind the table - see pics.
  2. Any preference right to left? I'm thinking closer to the left to provide more (table saw) fence travel on the left of the router.
  3. Anything else to consider before cutting the router plate opening?
Thanks all.
On a router table like the one you plan on making. I'd check out some of the router tables on the market to get an idea of what might work for you..

You might want to consider installing two routers. One with a fence, and a second spot for a router, which a fence won't needed (for when using bits with a bearing). This way you don't have to keep changing and resetting bits all the time. Some of the custom speaker makers will have 3 or 4 routers set-up on one router table/counter so each has dedicated bits. Saves time on production.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
On a router table like the one you plan on making. I'd check out some of the router tables on the market to get an idea of what might work for you..

You might want to consider installing two routers. One with a fence, and a second spot for a router, which a fence won't needed (for when using bits with a bearing). This way you don't have to keep changing and resetting bits all the time. Some of the custom speaker makers will have 3 or 4 routers set-up on one router table/counter so each has dedicated bits. Saves time on production.
I built a two spindle router table using two Delta table saw tops book matched together. The front of the insert opening was perfect for large raised panel bits, the cabinets were converted to dust collection boxes, and the modified stands , fence, and extensions made a nice stand alone cast iron work surface
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top