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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After applying the second coat of butcher block oil to this board I discovered the joint shown below. Fortunately the gaps do not go all the way through. I examine these boards very carefully as I glue them up as well as following each sanding course and I have no excuse for having missed this.

The net result, I need to use a razor blade knife to clean out the joint, add more glue and re- sand this side. That is unless fellow members come up with an alternative. In the interim, I shall cast disparaging remarks on my eye sight.
 

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Ouch! That oil may be a problem as far as the re-glue(?). If you have a hypodermic maybe you could flush the joint with Isopropyl alcohol? Acetone would make more sense but it might destroy the hypodermic.
 

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Router the joint out and add a contrasting wood like you would an inlay. If it`s at least a quarter inch thick then it will stand up to cutting on it.
 

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When I made mine I had a small crack at one of the joints which I filled with glue and the fine powdery saw dust form the board. It does not show at all now.
At least it doesn't to these old eyes.

David
Or epoxy with a dye in it. That was going to be my second suggestion but I thought since it was a cutting board the epoxy might not be a great idea. But it would be a good crack filler.
 

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I like the idea of router and inlay...I'm thinking that when you get in there with a razor knife it may open the gap a bit more making it difficult for glue to fill in (unless you use the sawdust trick). Router and inlay would be cleaner and probably less time consuming...

Good luck...
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well, I think I have it. Decided to go the glue/sawdust route as a first pass. Thinking there was I could always fall back on the inlay or alternatively just rip the board and reglue the joint. Latter approach might not be as disruptive to the pattern.

The results are shown below. Joint is smootH and I can't even get a toothpick to slip into any part of it. The side has been sanded again down to 220 to be oiled later.

Comments are always welcome.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
!... that's a crazy complex pattern, Jon. Did it sort of evolve or was it completely planned out in advance? You're a better man than I am, Gunga Din!
Thanks Dan. Actually the parts are the remnants from a board project I posted back in March of 2019. That post described how the blocks were made as well. The design in this one is once again the handy work of SWMBO who is also an accomplished quilter. Rest assured I would never have come up with that design. 😳

I'll post Another photo once I've applied the final coat of oil and beeswax.
 

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That's spectacular, Jon! Amazing how oil makes such a dramatic difference.
Cutting on end grain won't hurt it. Worst case, you sand it down again in 10 years.
Far worse for them is failing to re-apply the board butter regularly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
@honesttjohn, @DaninVan

John, that all depends on what SWMBO decides to do with it. If she keeps it, we'll use it. If she gifts it, it will probably be a show piece.��

Thanks, Dan. I get a bit of a preview when I sand the boards as I periodically wipe the surface with a damp cloth to raise the grain. The oil does indeed make the grains stand out. When the board is done one always sees a block or two that should have been turned around but that's life. ��

On to other things now, the weather is improving and the yard calls.
 
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