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Hello all. This is my first post on this forum. I am building an 18' flats boat using a stitch & glue method. I need to cut 2 bottom panels (6 pieces), 2 side panels (6 pieces) and 4 stringers (12 pieces). The nesting for each requires 3 sheets of 4 X 8 1/4" marine plywood with the cut pieces joined after cutting with butt blocks (or scarfed joints).

I have seen two methods for cutting used - CNC routing or jig saw. I don't have the money to purchase or hire the CNC routing and the jig saw cutting was rougher than I would like. Over 60% of the cutting is straight line, the balance curves.

Can you let me have hints and tips to use a hand held router to handle the curved parts. I will use a jig similar to a router dado jig for the straight line cutting.

I have attached the study plans for the boat.
 

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Mike
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Hi David,
Welcome to the router forums.

Not actually seeing the plans I can only guess what you need to do. I know that they would not want you to post the plans so just anyone could download them so I'll try to give you a quick answer with the limited knowledge I have of the project.

You can probably make templates to use with your router out of MDF or plywood. Take your time to make the templates so they are what you need to cut the parts. You can use a pattern bit or flush trim bit to do the cutting.

MLCS Flush Trim and Shear Angle Flush Trim Router Bits

Hope this helps,
 

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Theo
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You can probably make templates to use with your router out of MDF or plywood. Take your time to make the templates so they are what you need to cut the parts. You can use a pattern bit or flush trim bit to do the cutting.
Yep, that's what I would recommend too. That's how they make replacement pieces for Lyman boats, they've got a template/pattern for every piece, of every Lyman boat ever made. Well worth the time and effort to make one for each identical piece to my mind. I use 1/2" plywood, make one perfect piece, sometimes starting over from scratch, to get it just right. Then I glue that pattern onto another piece of 1/2" plywood, and rout using the first piece, when the glue dries. This gives you a master/pattern 1" thick. I do this for a couple of reasons, the double thickness is easier to handle, and give less chance of your fingers encountering the whirly parts. And, being double thickness that way I don't accidently use the pattern and wind up having to go thru the time and trouble of making another. By the way, I use 1/2" plywood in most of my projects, which is why I use it for my patterns. I'm pretty sure Lyman tacks their patterns down, which is what I do. I drill nail pilot holes, a lot of them, in my pattern piece, then use thin nails about 1 1/4" long to hold the pattern down. I don't pound them flat, altho you could. I leave a bit sticking up, and will routing the piece on the router table, with a bearing pattern bit, keep an eye on the nails, sometimes on the larger pieces if you don't use enough nails the the nails tend to loosen up, and the pattern and piece could actually shift, ruining the piece. Usually I can just pull the pattern off the piece without even pulling any of the nails. When I do need to pull the nails I found a 6" long flat bar nail puller at my local hardware for $1 that works perfectly. And, if the nails were pounded flat, you can work the end between the pieces, and loosen them enough to pull them apart. The nails remain straight and are reusable. In fact, the nails usually stay in the pattern, then you can just lay the pattern down, trace around it, rough cut, then tack the pattern down again, and make another, identical piece. And, if you flip the pattern, you can cut a mirror piece for the other side. I hope this is clear. I don't think I have any pictures at this time. Feel free to ask questions if anything is not clear.

Ah, checked and have an example of what I'm talking about. This is my master for one part of my figure banks I make, needs to be quite precise, and repeatable, both of which it is. Took probably five retries on this particular master before it was what I needed, but well worth the time and effort.
 

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Theo
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Addendum. You'll notice there are multiple pieces glued together to make the original piece of my master, before it was glued to the bottom part that was routed around. The multipieces are not particularly strong at times, but gluing to the bottom part takes care of that. This master is about 7" tall, and wound up working and looking clean so will leave it as is. Larger masters are often glued together similarly, but with the larger pieces involved, I often glue a block(s) on top to strengthen two or more pieces before they are glued to the bottom piece. On masters like those, I seldom retain and use them, exceptions would be if I only intend to use them to make maybe 3-4 pieces. Instead I use them to route out a clean, one piece pattern, which is glued to a second piece, and routed, creating a clean 1" thick master, and the cobbled together original is then either cut up and used for some other purpose, or trashed. Also if I have to make changes to a finished master, for whatever reason, I sometimes just cut a chunk out of the original, glue in wood, and shape the glued in wood as required.
 
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