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Howdy, A neighbor of mine has a section of cypress that he showed me which he said he cut in Florida in 1979. It is about 4" thick and all of the perimeter bark is still very nicely intact. As many of you already know, cypress sections do not even resemble "round", but rather like a "star with about 30 irregular points". It is finished very nicely on one side (looks like a polyurethane bar finish), but is completely unfinished on the opposite side.

The section measures 49" in diameter and he now has a piece of glass made to that size complete with nicely beveled edges. His intention is to build a table with this. I didn't know he had this project ongoing, but a few weeks ago, he came to visit and brought his fiance - who wanted to see the reptile collection. It was the first time either of them had been in my basement - which has tons of my woodworking projects within.

This visit triggered him asking my opinion on his cypress future table top. The unfinished side of the cypress has a couple of cracks in it. He asked how to "mend it" to prevent further widening of said crack. I told him that I would "ask around".

Interestingly, the log section HAS NOT CURLED WHATSOEVER! It just looks like it was tied between two horses that were "spanked in opposite directions"!

My initial thought was:
  • trowel-on an epoxy lawer
  • carefully impress carbon-fiber mat into fresh epoxy
  • follow-up with another epoxy layer

What are y'all's thoughts?

Thanks so much,
Otis Guillebeau from Auburn, Georgia
 

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skip the matting lay up...

watery tinted Epoxy resin poured/squeezed into the cracks... (looks better)
butterfly the larger cracks..
smaller cracks.. cyanoacrylate glue and sanding swarf/dust...
look to west system or system three for the epoxy..
Add the tints/swarf/dust to the resin before mixing in the hardener.

http://www.westsystem.com/ss/use-guides/


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That is no little piece of Cypress! All of Sticks ideas are spot on. I would, also, suggest that you look at a two part epoxy that is typically used on bar tops and to seal tabletops with underlying display items. It is a little pricy but will fill the cracks and stabilize the piece. Sorry, I don't recall the name of the product but a Google search should find a suitable product.

I had to do this for a friend who owned a bar. She had a 30' bar top made. The guy used Pecan. when they moved it from his house to the bar to install it the sun hit the top on the open trailer and the Pecan started to split in about a dozen places. I ended up sealing the whole bar top with the epoxy. All of the cracks filled and the top was smooth as glass. the cracks really added character to the top. That was about 25 years ago and the top has never changed.
 

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Agree with Bill and Stick but I think that I would use something like this: WEST SYSTEM | Specialty Epoxies - G/flex I'm thinking that something that thick and large is going to want to move a bit from season to season and the rigid epoxies would just transfer the stress to other sections and possibly make them want to crack.

If you've ever looked at the work of George Nakashima, he was fond of using bow ties to help prevent further splitting. https://www.google.ca/search?q=geor...Hr7C5NRyM:&usg=__BCAbOvuzNhDlRvJDbZiNNzaVhoo=
 

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A turner friend uses the West System 2-part epoxy to fill cracks and voids in burl or spalted blocks of wood before turning. He mixes it so it flows deep in the crack and keeps adding layers every hour until it stops going down. Seems like the stuff is thin enough to really soak into wood. He says it takes 48 hours to fully cure.

Steve.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
OKAY - THANKS GUYS.

It seems that the general consensus is that every one of you agrees. I'll cut him some bow-ties and use multiple layers of a thin epoxy to self-level into the cracks.

Thanks again!

Otis Guillebeau from /Auburn, Georgia
 
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