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Oliver (Prof. Henry)
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Yeah, I know. Dados should be cut with a router and a fancy adjustable jig. But sometimes it’s just quicker, faster, and easier to cut them on the table saw.

When I bought my set of Oshlun dado blades they came well protected and packaged but in a cardboard box. Since the set of 8” blades weighs almost ten pounds I didn’t think the box would last long. Plus, although it protected the blades well, it wasn’t really user friendly.

I went through several concepts in my mind always worrying about how strong a box was needed to hold the weight and how to make it convenient to use and store. I finally settled on a design that required minimal box strength to work and then planned the project in Sketchup so I wouldn’t screw up when I cut out the parts.

The heart of the box is a vertical blade holder / handle made from 3/4” plywood. It really carries all of the weight. The base of the box is 1/2” MDF and the rest was made out some re-claimed 3/8” plywood I had on hand.

You’ll notice the sides have a 10º angle on the back. It serves two purposes: First, it makes the footprint a little deeper so the box doesn’t fall over from the blade weight; and second, it gives me a staging area to set up my dado stack and check against my stock size before putting the blades on the saw.A removable 5/8” post is used when stacking the blades. The post stores inside the box when not needed. The blades and shims are stored on the center 3/4” panel with a 1/2” bolt and wing nut.

A simple sliding cover closes the front and I glued a printout of which blades to use to set up a cut to the inside of it. The finished box with blades in place weighs about 13 1/2 pounds. I think it will be secure and convenient storage for the dado set.
 

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that's sweet Oliver...
but why no roll top...
 

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Oliver (Prof. Henry)
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Discussion Starter #4

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John
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Nice job well executed
But like Stick was surprised no batteries or moving pieces
 

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Interesting solution Oliver. I'm not satisfied with the setup in my box either so taking a good look at this. By the way, what do you think of the Oshlun blades? I'm looking at some of their other ones.
 

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Very nice, Oliver. The hinge broke on the cheap plastic case for my Delta set, and something like this would be a great replacement. My set has a bunch of shims, so I need somewhere for those to go, too. Thanks for the ideas.
 

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Nice, Oliver.

I ran into the same thing with mine several years ago. I just constructed a simple lidded box out of 3/4" pine with a dowel in the center for the blades and a separate one in the corner for the shims. It was "rude, crude and socially unacceptable", but it did the job at the time. I have never felt a need to fancy the box up, even though that has always been the intention. Now you've got me thinking....
 
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Oliver (Prof. Henry)
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Discussion Starter #9
By the way, what do you think of the Oshlun blades? I'm looking at some of their other ones.
I chose the Oshlun blades because they have full body 6 tooth chippers and the price was right at around $100. I have only used them a few times but I've been happy with the very clean and accurate cuts.
 

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that's sweet Oliver...
but why no roll top...
I was thinking more on the lines of a Iris opening because it is Oliver but then the box would need to be bigger.
 
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Yeah, I know. Dados should be cut with a router and a fancy adjustable jig. But sometimes it’s just quicker, faster, and easier to cut them on the table saw.

When I bought my set of Oshlun dado blades they came well protected and packaged but in a cardboard box. Since the set of 8” blades weighs almost ten pounds I didn’t think the box would last long. Plus, although it protected the blades well, it wasn’t really user friendly.

I went through several concepts in my mind always worrying about how strong a box was needed to hold the weight and how to make it convenient to use and store. I finally settled on a design that required minimal box strength to work and then planned the project in Sketchup so I wouldn’t screw up when I cut out the parts.

The heart of the box is a vertical blade holder / handle made from 3/4” plywood. It really carries all of the weight. The base of the box is 1/2” MDF and the rest was made out some re-claimed 3/8” plywood I had on hand.

You’ll notice the sides have a 10º angle on the back. It serves two purposes: First, it makes the footprint a little deeper so the box doesn’t fall over from the blade weight; and second, it gives me a staging area to set up my dado stack and check against my stock size before putting the blades on the saw.A removable 5/8” post is used when stacking the blades. The post stores inside the box when not needed. The blades and shims are stored on the center 3/4” panel with a 1/2” bolt and wing nut.

A simple sliding cover closes the front and I glued a printout of which blades to use to set up a cut to the inside of it. The finished box with blades in place weighs about 13 1/2 pounds. I think it will be secure and convenient storage for the dado set.






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