Router Forums banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Do any of you find a Dado blade for your table saw necessary, or do you, like I use a router for all you dados? I've had a number of people recommend lately that I get a dado blade for my saw, but I've managed for all these years to do all my dados with a router.

My saw is awesome, but I don't want to buy a dado blade that I don't need. I've got to think a router does a smoother job anyway.

Regards,

Jim
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
11,934 Posts
Jim, it really depends on how many dado cuts you will be making. Non stop furniture building a dado saw is a better choice. For most people the router is way less money and set up time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,046 Posts
Do any of you find a Dado blade for your table saw necessary, or do you, like I use a router for all you dados? I've had a number of people recommend lately that I get a dado blade for my saw, but I've managed for all these years to do all my dados with a router.

My saw is awesome, but I don't want to buy a dado blade that I don't need. I've got to think a router does a smoother job anyway.

Regards,

Jim
Hi Jim - I have a dado set but I use it mainly for low tolerance work, half lapping 2x stock for benches or tools stand or making face frames. For nice, precise, flat bottom dados it's tough to beat a router. I didn't put a ton of $$ in the dado set, 6" freud low end one, about $75 on Amazon.:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,459 Posts
Jim; For dadoing and rabbeting cabinet gables, I prefer my TS, No particular reason, just personal preference. However, for dadoing/rabbeting across a long piece (say 6' or longer, perpendicular to the length) it's the router by default.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,747 Posts
If you are satisfied with your present set up, I wouldn't change.
Like a previous poster mentioned, I only use my dado blade for joints not requiring real close tolerances.
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
I mostly use the TS also. It takes a little longer to get the width right but being able to use the fence for repetitive cuts that need to be exactly the same distance apart on paanels a little too big for the RT makes the saw the better bet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,773 Posts
It depends on where I want to route the groove. I find it easier to use the dado blade on anything except the end of a board. It is very difficult to set up a straight edge to put a groove in say the middle of an 18" wide board. With the dado blade and the fence on the saw it is a snap. Besides a blade you will also need a new insert for the saw. As far as the blade goes you can get an adjustable one cheaper than the type with the series of cutters. Also check Craigs list they go for about $20 bucks in my area.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
766 Posts
Do any of you find a Dado blade for your table saw necessary, or do you, like I use a router for all you dados? I've had a number of people recommend lately that I get a dado blade for my saw, but I've managed for all these years to do all my dados with a router.

My saw is awesome, but I don't want to buy a dado blade that I don't need. I've got to think a router does a smoother job anyway.

Regards,

Jim
I bought the dado set at the same time I bought my first TS. It was the main reason I wanted the TS. Since then I have tried every way I am aware of that they are cut, except perhaps the saw and chisel method. Saw an plane works just find when I only need one or two 'plane friendly' joints.

The dimensions of the cut (all three of them), the size of the workpiece, where the cut is on the workpiece (how far from sides/ends of the board) and the type of wood all affect my opinion regarding what the best way for me to make the cut is. For example a .25" x .25" x 24" groove in the edge of a 1"x2"x24" that is going to be used in a panel is an entirely different cut than taking a 3.5" x 3.5" x .75" cross grain rabbet off the end of a 2 by 4.

After I get to the point of deciding which tool should give the balance of resulting quality, setup time & clean up time, I give my 'mood' a chance to over rule my scientific decision on how to cut it....:) I should also point out that my 'scientific opinions' aren't always accurate..:) Some times I am in the mood to set up the 'power shop' in the driveway and sometimes I'm not.

The first dado cuts I made were on a 199.00 cheapo TS with the Avanti Stacked Dado Set (49.99 at the orange box). I soon found out that there are many different types of joints that use a dado, rabbet or groove.

After learning how to do them on a TS, I started looking into how they are done with routers, both table mounted and freehand/ski-mounted. Luck and circumstances dropped a Radial Arm Saw into my lap and it turned out to be the second machine I used to make that style cut on.

Table mounted routers came next. The cuts are so much faster on a TS or RAS that I really haven't done many on my Router table. At the same time, I still think there are some styles of dado/rabbet cutting that a router table would be ideal for, especially if it were left set up for that kind of cut.

There are also some cuts that I prefer do with planes and or handsaws. The smaller the workpiece, the more I prefer the safety of hand tools.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
474 Posts
Jim, for me and here, I must also tell you, I am a very early beginner The router has been a very easey way to make the cuts that I needed. With that said, I also am a hobbist, so I do not need to make very many cuts of this type at a time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
I have a OLD Craftman dado blade. I will rough cut the dado with the table saw to remove a lot of material fast. Then finish with the router to get a smooth clean cut that my dado blade on my table saw will not give me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
522 Posts
I have 2 Freud SD608 8-Inch Dial-A-Width Stacked Dado Set 5/8-Inch Arbor (1 for radial arm saw and 1 for table saw) and very seldom use them. I prefer to use a plunge router with a Dadomax jig. The jig is much easier to set up and the cut is clean.

Al
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
110 Posts
Jim; For dadoing and rabbeting cabinet gables, I prefer my TS, No particular reason, just personal preference. However, for dadoing/rabbeting across a long piece (say 6' or longer, perpendicular to the length) it's the router by default.
**************************************************
QUOTE: Daninvan " it's the router by default ".
How true that is. I like that statement.

I'd personally rather hear my good stacked dado severing wood fibers on my old table saw than a loud ( ear plug required ) router but as Daninvan says, sometimes it just doesn't work very well.

Since I have both, it was the router rather than an 8" table saw when I was ask by my daughter in-law to build a couple of free standing shelving storage units for wicker baskets. Nothing great but a fun project for the grandkids.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,298 Posts
I have 2 Freud SD608 8-Inch Dial-A-Width Stacked Dado Set 5/8-Inch Arbor (1 for radial arm saw and 1 for table saw) and very seldom use them. I prefer to use a plunge router with a Dadomax jig. The jig is much easier to set up and the cut is clean.

Al
interested in selling one of your freud dado sets? pm me if so
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Wow lot's of good insight on this topic, I think I'll budget in a dado blade My guess is I'll use it, even if just for rough dados. I know I have 3 very dull 3/4" straight router bits from years of use (and resharpening)

Thanks,

Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
I have a 8" 24Tooth Onsrud dado set I would like to sell at a very reasonable $. It is brand new never used. I purchased it last yr when I was going to buy a table saw. I ended up with a track saw system instead and this has been sitting in it's box every since. Pm me for any details.

Rod
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top