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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
The MPT design from Dan Pattison looks very cool. His design looks like a great alternative to dropping a grand on the Festool MFT/3.

I have to do some more homework. I’m not sure if Dan made his own top or if he used the Festool MFT CNC top for his design. It definitely shows some ingeniuity vs relying on Festool to deliver a solution.


What do you guys think of Dan Pattison’s MTF design?
 

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The MPT design from Dan Pattison looks very cool. His design looks like a great alternative to dropping a grand on the Festool MFT/3.

I have to do some more homework. I’m not sure if Dan made his own top or if he used the Festool MFT CNC top for his design. It definitely shows some ingeniuity vs relying on Festool to deliver a solution.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=qL6fyzeY0Nw

What do you guys think of Dan Pattison’s MTF design?
Stevin he has some good ideas but I really don't care for the legs. They look awful flimsy.
 

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Theo
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Stevin he has some good ideas but I really don't care for the legs. They look awful flimsy.
Well, pipe, so could be strong enough. But I don't really care for the look of them, and most definitely don't care for the fastenings - looks like there is wiggle room, and they will eventually work loose. If I were going to make one I'd make nice sturdy legs too.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Well, pipe, so could be strong enough. But I don't really care for the look of them, and most definitely don't care for the fastenings - looks like there is wiggle room, and they will eventually work loose. If I were going to make one I'd make nice sturdy legs too.
The cost of the Parf jig a bitter pill to swallow unless you can justify the fact it will be used a 2nd time to make a replacement top over time.

You can buy the Festool CNC top for less money online than you can buy a PARF jig.

UJK Parf Guide Drilling System - Lee Valley Tools
 

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Theo
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The cost of the Parf jig a bitter pill to swallow unless you can justify the fact it will be used a 2nd time to make a replacement top over time.

You can buy the Festool CNC top for less money online than you can buy a PARF jig.

UJK Parf Guide Drilling System - Lee Valley Tools
Yoikes. Fortunately, or unfortunately, I don't have room for my shop for a table like that, so don't have to worry about buying a jig. However, if I did have the room, and wanted a table, I wouldn't buy a jig, I'd make one. Even if you outsourced the welding, it would still be low cost, and pretty simple - as long as you get the measurements right. But for a one-time use, I'd likely just make one from wood. with metal/pipe guides.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yoikes. Fortunately, or unfortunately, I don't have room for my shop for a table like that, so don't have to worry about buying a jig. However, if I did have the room, and wanted a table, I wouldn't buy a jig, I'd make one. Even if you outsourced the welding, it would still be low cost, and pretty simple - as long as you get the measurements right. But for a one-time use, I'd likely just make one from wood. with metal/pipe guides.
If you have a CNC, you don’t need one.

You’re paying the big bucks for the CNC for the Parf Dogs. It would be easier to buy the Festool top in Dan’s design. You’re pretty much burning away a perfectly good day of your life trying to manually drill perfectly square Parf dog holes into a large top.

Dan’s design is using a thinner leg so the table is lighter and easier to lift and transport onsite. He’s been using the same table in all of his videos for the past several years. Thicker doesn’t = stronger. A thinner leg made with a strong steel or aluminum should be more than adequate.
 

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Stupid question.... do the holes need to be spaced with such accuracy? (Alright, I am cheap....)

You could lay out your grid using a sheet of peg board as a template $6

General drill guide (3/8 chuck) $35
General Tools Drill Guide and Chuck-36/37 - The Home Depot

20mm (or whatever size your dogs are) Forstner bit $9

https://www.woodcraft.com/products/woodriver-20mm-forstner-bit

About $50, and you can use the tools for other projects as well.

OOPS! - I forgot a VIX bit or a transfer punch for using with the Perf Board for marking the centers
 

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@kp91

The accuracy is needed if the hole pattern is used to establish perpendicular lines, when horizontal dogs are used to mimic a fence and the vertical dogs to set the rail/track perpendicular to the "fence", This way, the part being cut can be butted against the horizontal dogs, the track against the vertical ones and a perpendicular cut made on the part.

The attached photo shows this - I'm squaring up the end of a panel that has been run through the table saw before cutting to size for a drawer bottom. Also, the dogs can be set on a diagonal and used to cut a 45° on the part.

There are a couple of vendors that sell "jigs" utilizing a piece of pegboard and a plunge router to make a top; I've watched the videos of the operation and would guess that the Parf Guide is an easier way to go. I'd looked at the Parf Guides and would agree that the cost is such that it's not economical unless you make more than one top, or are looking for something other than the standard Festool size replacement top.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
@kp91

The accuracy is needed if the hole pattern is used to establish perpendicular lines, when horizontal dogs are used to mimic a fence and the vertical dogs to set the rail/track perpendicular to the "fence", This way, the part being cut can be butted against the horizontal dogs, the track against the vertical ones and a perpendicular cut made on the part.

The attached photo shows this - I'm squaring up the end of a panel that has been run through the table saw before cutting to size for a drawer bottom. Also, the dogs can be set on a diagonal and used to cut a 45° on the part.

There are a couple of vendors that sell "jigs" utilizing a piece of pegboard and a plunge router to make a top; I've watched the videos of the operation and would guess that the Parf Guide is an easier way to go. I'd looked at the Parf Guides and would agree that the cost is such that it's not economical unless you make more than one top, or are looking for something other than the standard Festool size replacement top.
The value of the PARF jig I think would come down to how often you use and how much wear you put on the table top. Someone making cabinets for a living is going to put more mileage on their table top versus the home hobbyist and enthusiast.

The home user would better off buying a Festool top online. I’ll have to take a look at Dan’s design to see if the Parf dog jig is required for the sides of the table.
 

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Theo
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Stupid question.... do the holes need to be spaced with such accuracy? (Alright, I am cheap....)

You could lay out your grid using a sheet of peg board as a template $6

General drill guide (3/8 chuck) $35
General Tools Drill Guide and Chuck-36/37 - The Home Depot

20mm (or whatever size your dogs are) Forstner bit $9

https://www.woodcraft.com/products/woodriver-20mm-forstner-bit

About $50, and you can use the tools for other projects as well.

OOPS! - I forgot a VIX bit or a transfer punch for using with the Perf Board for marking the centers
That's pretty much how I would do it. Except I would just mark it out with a ruler, pencil, and straightedge, and seeing as how I don't have a transfer punch, I would likely just use a nail. As for accuracy of the holes, I don't see why they can't be a hair off. I don't see it taking too long to drill the holes either.
 
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Theo
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@kp91

The accuracy is needed if the hole pattern is used to establish perpendicular lines, when horizontal dogs are used to mimic a fence and the vertical dogs to set the rail/track perpendicular to the "fence", This way, the part being cut can be butted against the horizontal dogs, the track against the vertical ones and a perpendicular cut made on the part.
Personally, I would not use that type of dog. I'd go with something similar to these. And make my own.
https://www.woodcraft.com/products/...GzGnA4rOlq-2CkIQFeWWv04v2XrigRoMaAlteEALw_wcB
 

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The taller dogs are required to provide a stop for the track. The short dogs work fine if you're just using them for locators.
No prob. I could make as tall as I wanted.
 

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Let me just say this. You have to be very accurate to drill the holes for perfect alignment. Or, your jig must be very accurate. I did both and my holes are off a little.

Now saying that, I really don't need the holes to line up my cuts with a track saw, so I got over it and moved on. Prior to getting my CNC, I paid a guy to cut a pair of work table tops for me. Well shucks, I asked for 3/4 inch holes and that is what I got. Some of my dogs don't fit. But my modified HF clamps do fit and that makes me a happy feller.

In case some of you missed it, here is my new work bench.

New Work Bench for the shop.
http://www.routerforums.com/show-n-tell/105625-work-bench-make-over.html

And here is my thread on the portable work table. It has been working great. I have no regrets. In fact, it is set up at a house where I am remodeling a kitchen (complete tear out/redo).
http://www.routerforums.com/show-n-tell/107689-cnc-cut-portable-wortable.html
 
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