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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a delta Rockwell dp220 but the motor turns very slow ? Forward and reverse). Brushless motor. I cleaned armature and checked wires. Still barely rotated. Any ideas on the finding a motor for this thing?
 

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Welcome to the forum.
 

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Welcome aboard. I'm not familiar with this drill press but have you checked the voltage? I'm guessing it is variable speed but don't know. I'd be inclined to check with Rockwell customer support if possible 1st and go from there.
 

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That motor appears to be an induction motor. They don't have brushes and should run at speed based on the power line frequency. Is there a large metal "bump" cover on it's side? In it is a motor starting capacitor that is part of a starting circuit. As old as that drill press is, that capacitor is likely defective. You should not attempt using the drill press until you replace this capacitor as continued use can burn up the windings in the motor. DON'T let the magic smoke out. You want to buy one with the same voltage and mfd. rating, or slightly higher, but it also has to fit in that metal cover so it's physical size and shape is important too. It also needs to be an AC rated capacitor and not DC. This will usually show on the label like 120 V "AC" or 240 V "AC".

There is also a "starting switch" inside the non shaft end of the motor that will need attention. The contacts should be clean with no pits and spring loaded tight together. Use a small file or coarse sand paper to clean them up. Where they touch together should be smooth for maximum contact area (80%+) touching each other

On the motor shaft there is an assembly with springs. This is the actuator for the switch. The spring loaded weights should swing away from the shaft as the motor comes up to speed and open that switch that you just cleaned up. The weights move a hard plastic ring on the motor shaft that opens the switch. The shaft area where this plastic ring slides needs to be clean of rust and dirt, and a very thin coat of oil or a synthetic grease applied. You don't want so much that it flies off as the motor spins. Just enough to allow the plastic ring to slide on the shaft easily. Synthetic grease will not dry out or get sticky over time like petroleum lubricants.

Now re-assemble the motor and try it again, but don't leave power on it too long if it doesn't come up to speed. If still having trouble with it or you would rather have someone else do this work, take it to a local electric motor shop near you.

Charley
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
That motor appears to be an induction motor. They don't have brushes and should run at speed based on the power line frequency. Is there a large metal "bump" cover on it's side? In it is a motor starting capacitor that is part of a starting circuit. As old as that drill press is, that capacitor is likely defective. You should not attempt using the drill press until you replace this capacitor as continued use can burn up the windings in the motor. DON'T let the magic smoke out. You want to buy one with the same voltage and mfd. rating, or slightly higher, but it also has to fit in that metal cover so it's physical size and shape is important too. It also needs to be an AC rated capacitor and not DC. This will usually show on the label like 120 V "AC" or 240 V "AC".

There is also a "starting switch" inside the non shaft end of the motor that will need attention. The contacts should be clean with no pits and spring loaded tight together. Use a small file or coarse sand paper to clean them up. Where they touch together should be smooth for maximum contact area (80%+) touching each other

On the motor shaft there is an assembly with springs. This is the actuator for the switch. The spring loaded weights should swing away from the shaft as the motor comes up to speed and open that switch that you just cleaned up. The weights move a hard plastic ring on the motor shaft that opens the switch. The shaft area where this plastic ring slides needs to be clean of rust and dirt, and a very thin coat of oil or a synthetic grease applied. You don't want so much that it flies off as the motor spins. Just enough to allow the plastic ring to slide on the shaft easily. Synthetic grease will not dry out or get sticky over time like petroleum lubricants.

Now re-assemble the motor and try it again, but don't leave power on it too long if it doesn't come up to speed. If still having trouble with it or you would rather have someone else do this work, take it to a local electric motor shop near you.

Charley
Thanks. There is no motor cap on this thing. I am going to verify voltage is 240 from my panel breaker. Have not used it in a long time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
If there's no cap & the motor states 240V, Then it's probably a 3 phase motor.
Look inside the wire junction box, If there's 9 wires then it's a 3-phase motor.

Doug
Thanks Doug. There are 6 wires in the box
If there's no cap & the motor states 240V, Then it's probably a 3 phase motor.
Look inside the wire junction box, If there's 9 wires then it's a 3-phase motor.

Doug
Thanks Doug There are 6 wires going to the control box (forward and reverse) and 6 wires in the breaker box. I have changed nothing with the wiring. The original plug was cut off so I replaced it. Maybe I should check my wires. Motor does turn but like I said it is very slow
 

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The original plug was cut off so I replaced it. Maybe I should check my wires.
A picture of the motor & the control box may help.

But if it was working before & just hasn't been used in awhile, I would double check the plug connections.

If by chance the motor is an old Craftsman (Emerson) like this one.

Then there's a oval shaped cap inside the base where the switch is.

Doug
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
A picture of the motor & the control box may help.

But if it was working before & just hasn't been used in awhile, I would double check the plug connections.

If by chance the motor is an old Craftsman (Emerson) like this one.

Then there's a oval shaped cap inside the base where the switch is.

Doug
 

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It is an old model. I bought it from a machine shop but I have not verified voltage. I will do that later this morning. Thank you
Those old 220 are selling for quite some money. If it is clean and the bearings, quill and chuck are in good condition your easily looking at a $200 drill.
I'm a bit confused as you said it has a 'Brushless' motor yet you cleaned the armature. This motor should have capacitor start. You need to have that checked. Without the umph from the cap it will do what your saying or won't start at all. Plus it may have a 'Run' capacitor.
Take it to an electric motor shop and have it checked.
 

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A picture of the motor & the control box may help.

But if it was working before & just hasn't been used in awhile, I would double check the plug connections.

If by chance the motor is an old Craftsman (Emerson) like this one.

Then there's a oval shaped cap inside the base where the switch is.

Doug
Why would it be a Craftsman motor?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Those old 220 are selling for quite some money. If it is clean and the bearings, quill and chuck are in good condition your easily looking at a $200 drill.
I'm a bit confused as you said it has a 'Brushless' motor yet you cleaned the armature. This motor should have capacitor start. You need to have that checked. Without the umph from the cap it will do what your saying or won't start at all. Plus it may have a 'Run' capacitor.
Take it to an electric motor shop and have it checked.
Thanks. I mis spoke I meant stator not armature . Sorry. It has no motor cap as that was my first thought. It is a three phase motor. It has been tested and is a good motor. I took another look at my breaker box in the garage. It I only had 3 wires coming in from service entrance hence it is single phase only. The motor being 3 phase therefore cannot generate enough torque. I can rewind the motor, buy a converter or a vfd. I think I will just sell it. Thanks fof everyone’s help.
 

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Thanks. I mis spoke I meant stator not armature . Sorry. It has no motor cap as that was my first thought. It is a three phase motor. It has been tested and is a good motor. I took another look at my breaker box in the garage. It I only had 3 wires coming in from service entrance hence it is single phase only. The motor being 3 phase therefore cannot generate enough torque. I can rewind the motor, buy a converter or a vfd. I think I will just sell it. Thanks fof everyone’s help.
Where are you located? I'm looking for a 220 drill.
 
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