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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Morning and Seasons Greetings......

I'm looking for some advice from anyone who has had, or owns a Dewalt 625e. Early last summer my 625e developed a fault. It would power up then within seconds power down making a kind of buzzing noise, or if it carried on running would be erratic and hunt like there was no speed control.

I removed the cap to check the brushes which, looked fairly good, I tested the wiring for continuity where I could. Having found no issues I worked on the premise that the speed regulator PCB was at fault. While waiting for the part to arrive I used the opportunity to open the unit up to give it a proper clean, however in the process the magnetic pole end was broken. It was completely seized on there and no amount of gentle even coaxing could persuade it to come off in one piece so I ordered up a replacement.

Putting he router back together I noticed that the new magnetic pole end is too loose - the end of the pole has splines , the new pole end should have a nice tight tolerance fit over those splines - but this is not the case. I have double checked the part number and it is correct, also it is a genuine part but is marked Black and Decker.

Has anyone else come across this?

Many thanks is advance.
 

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Hi Sean and welcome. B & D, DeWalt, and Stanley are all one company. Shoe Goo might work too if the tolerances are too loose for threadlocker.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Afternoon all

TenGees thanks for the link - dam interesting read, clearly a design floor. So I'm going to have to glue the magnetic pole end in place over the splines. You would expect better to be honest, I've used a plunge router on the table for years and never came across these issues - maybe I was just lucky!

Danman1957 - thank you.

CherryVille Chuck - yes so I discovered, who knew!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
ok update - top tip!

I had some of that 'heat shrink' plastic tube you use to protect small soldered wires - I had a width that fitted nice and snug, didn't even need to heat it. I then slide the pole end magnet on - it's a snug fit so hopefully that will resolve it - now I just have to remember how the wires were fitted onto the regulator!

Wahoo - she lives again!! I think I'll use my DW624 for the router table and keep the DW625e for the other stuff - thanks again for all the help - great forum.

Happy New year to you all when it comes about....
 

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Paul
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Another issue with router tables is the lower dust extraction method which could hinder the router's normal air flow. This could cause extra heat which may affect the longevity of the controller (among other things). This was recently commented on by Stick and Chuck but I can't find the thread. Basically you have to vacuum from around the bit area but not from the intake area around the cap of the router. Some people (like Herb) have added venting into the router compartment which helps the router's normal air flow.
 

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I think the info Paul is referring to is in the pdf that Stick lists in post #18 of this thread: https://www.routerforums.com/general-routing/137051-router-cabinet-dust-collection-size-2.html I couldn't find the original thread it came from either.

Sean keep one fact in mind when planing your dust collection, namely that 100% of the dust gets created ABOVE the table and zero % gets created below the table. Some particles get flung downwards but the vast majority stays above the table. If, like most of us, you use a plate with insert rings to keep the opening around the bit as narrow as possible then that means you are are trying to suck 98 or 99% of the dust down through a very narrow opening into a box or other dust pickup. This is fairly illogical in my opinion and that isn't counting all the other issues that are created if you go with a box concept.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
...all good info which I thank you for.

I use a purpose made router table by Trend - the pickup for the dust extraction is mounted on the surface, not below the table. For the most part this is pretty good keeping the router below clear of most debris..but this largely does depend on the type of work I'm doing. As the extraction is mounted directly to the fence if I'm not using the fence then it doesn't get extracted and I find myself thinking of various ways to keep the debris away from the router intake. Like I said for the most part it works well.
 

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The other process that I can think of where above table extraction doesn't work is dadoing on a table. But I do mine either handheld or on my table saw so it doesn't apply to my work practices. I'm curios what you do on a table that you don't use a fence. I know that you can just use a bearing guided bit with no fence but you can also use one with a fence and then you still have the fence mounted dust control.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
no you're right it's very rare that i use the table without a fence - the only time i have needed to do it recently was in making some half lap joints for my flute stand.

We had an old oak low level cupboard with one drawer in the top - as with most builds the only 'real' wood was the parts that formed the main structure, top, bottom and the corners - the rest of the unit was very thin oak board. So I took it apart chopped off all the bevelling, ran it through the planner and made up some much needed picture frames. I had just enough scrap left over to make a small stand for my Native America flutes - nothing clever but I needed to put a couple of legs on to provide support.

I wouldn't normally use a router to make the half lap joints but my radial arm saw is at my Dads, about a 40 minute drive.

So I used the slide guide that comes with the table to which I bolted some stock then hand clamped the flute stand to that. So the piece I was working on is mounted at 90 degrees to the front on the table. Because of the length of the stand I couldn't use the fence and mounted the extraction hose just in front of the blade to catch the debris as it was thrown forward.

Not ideal, but it got the job done and far quicker then driving to my dads and back!

One thing I will add, when I took the 625e apart there is actually a plastic shield behind the main fan at the base that prevents debris falling into the heart of the router itself - it must work pretty well because the internals were surprisingly clean.
 
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