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David - Machinist in wood
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought it new in 1997 and used it off and on for the first 17 years but in the last 3 I have used it a lot, sometimes daily. It has always run fine but today I turned it on and it ran for 1/2 a second then quit. Here's what I know:

1) It is getting power, I even switched to different circuit altogether
2) I pulled the switch out to verify that it is good
3) The brushes, though original, are still 1/2" long and show no signs of chipping or abnormal wear
4) The wires on the brushes are intact and the springs have plenty of tension
5) The motor is easy to spins (took the side covers off to verify)
6) The 18 amp built-in breaker on the top of the motor is in the position it should be in
7) In shining a light onto the commutator I see no chips or bridged arcs between segments

I don't really want to spend the money on a new planer and would rather get this one running again. I can order new brushes just to rule that out but again, the current ones look fine to me.

Ideas?

David
 

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Theo
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With me it was a drill press. Replaced the switch and that was all it took to fix it. Still going strong.
 

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David - Machinist in wood
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
That's what I don't understand. It has never given a hint of trouble and ran fine yesterday. When I turned it on today and it ran for a 1/2 second I thought it must have tripped a breaker. But everything else plugged into that same circuit runs fine. So I plugged it into another one with the same result. Then I pulled the switch completely out, plugged it in again, and checked power on both sides of the switch and there's a full 120 volts on the motor side of the switch.

This is the position of the breaker switch, looks to me like that's where it's supposed to be. And it doesn't want to move at all other than a slight rocking back and forth but it's always been like that. And it has never tripped.

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David
 

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Jumpering a wire across the breaker contacts will prove if that's the problem at least. Just do that and turn it on. Be prepared to turn it off quickly too. It doesn't sound like a burned armature and you say it shows no signs. Usually there is a drop in power and rpm just before it quits if that is the problem. About the only other thing I can think of is a broken wire.
 

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David; did you do a simple continuity check to the load side of the switch?
When something was working and then it's not...what changed?
do that to the breaker too...
 

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That's what I don't understand. It has never given a hint of trouble and ran fine yesterday. When I turned it on today and it ran for a 1/2 second I thought it must have tripped a breaker. But everything else plugged into that same circuit runs fine. So I plugged it into another one with the same result. Then I pulled the switch completely out, plugged it in again, and checked power on both sides of the switch and there's a full 120 volts on the motor side of the switch.

This is the position of the breaker switch, looks to me like that's where it's supposed to be. And it doesn't want to move at all other than a slight rocking back and forth but it's always been like that. And it has never tripped.

View attachment 300066

View attachment 300074

David
I would get to the switch, detach some wire(s) and check the switch continuity when in ON & OFF positions...

Do the same thing to the Breaker / Fuse IN THE Machine... The Breaker could go bad... and if the breaker went bad, there is probably a REASON for it... ergo, another problem somewhere... (??)

Those two items should shed some light on it...
You have to check each one on it's own, NOT connected to the machine.

Let us know what happens, OK?

Good luck...
 

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The wire between the switch and motor OK? Is the breaker broken (just happened to an old one in my house panel.) Anything jammed in the blades, or any binding in the drive that rotates the blade?
 

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David - Machinist in wood
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I would get to the switch, detach some wire(s) and check the switch continuity when in ON & OFF positions...

Then I pulled the switch completely out, plugged it (the power cord) in again, and checked power on both sides of the switch and there's a full 120 volts on the motor side of the switch.
David
Do the same thing to the Breaker / Fuse IN THE Machine... The Breaker could go bad... and if the breaker went bad, there is probably a REASON for it... ergo, another problem somewhere... (??)

Those two items should shed some light on it...
You have to check each one on it's own, NOT connected to the machine.

Let us know what happens, OK?

Good luck...
Did that already - see above. I can pull it again and check continuity but if it's getting 120 volts on the switched side then I'm going to say the switch is good. To get to the little breaker I've shown in the photo requires a full breakdown and I won't have time for that until the end of the week.

Thanks!
David
 

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David - Machinist in wood
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The wire between the switch and motor OK? Is the breaker broken (just happened to an old one in my house panel.) Anything jammed in the blades, or any binding in the drive that rotates the blade?
I'll have to do a complete breakdown to get to the wires past the switch, Tom. I can see about 3" of wire and that's all. It's getting power, tried two sources. The blades spin easily by hand, no resistance above what it should be with the drive belt still attached.

Thanks!
David
 

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David - Machinist in wood
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
David, From the photo, it looks like the breaker can be popped out with a screwdriver.
I thought about that but not being certain I didn't want to break it. I may dive into the motor breakdown PDF and see if I can tell. If so that would be MUCH easier! Thanks!

You did check the brushes, right? DeWalt brushes only last about 100 hours on their handheld tools.
I thought about that, too, but when I talked to DeWalt they told me the OEM replacement brush is only a tiny bit longer than mine at 1/2". The manual says there's a line on the brush and when that line is reached it's time to change them. This model doesn't have the line but when I look at a photo of the replacement brush that line is about 1/8" from the spring. If that's the case then these are lifetime brushes, for me, anyway. Thanks!

David
 

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Thing that gets my attention David, is that it started then stopped. I'm assuming you hadn't actually started running a board through when it quit?
It really sounds like there's a break in the cct. somewhere(?). As others have said, if it were a motor issue you should have had some kind of indication before it died.
You're getting power on the load side of the switch so that (probably) eliminates everything between the load side of that switch and the panel.
Are there any safety interlocks of any kind, other than the breaker?
 

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Did that already - see above. I can pull it again and check continuity but if it's getting 120 volts on the switched side then I'm going to say the switch is good. To get to the little breaker I've shown in the photo requires a full breakdown and I won't have time for that until the end of the week.

Thanks!
David
Then you must follow the 120v TO the Motor...

If it's getting to the motor and the motor doesn't run, the motor is bad.
 

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David - Machinist in wood
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thing that gets my attention David, is that it started then stopped. I'm assuming you hadn't actually started running a board through when it quit?
It really sounds like there's a break in the cct. somewhere(?). As others have said, if it were a motor issue you should have had some kind of indication before it died.
You're getting power on the load side of the switch so that (probably) eliminates everything between the load side of that switch and the panel.
Are there any safety interlocks of any kind, other than the breaker?
Correct, Dan, it didn't run long enough to even get my hand off the switch so no boards went through. I don't see any interlocks other than the 18 amp built-in breaker (overload).

Did the motor 'wind down" when it quite or did it suddenly STOP?
No, Bill, it spun down but never even got up to half speed. Well, maybe a better way to say that is it wound down from whatever speed it attained in that 1/2 second, which may have been more like 1/4 second. And the motor is very free to spin by hand.

Thanks, Guys!
David
 

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Since it never reached speed, I'm still going with brushes. But if there's a cap on the motor, it could be that, too, I guess. I've had one of those go on a drill press. I had to spin the chuck by hand to get it going.
 

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switch/cable/brushes sound good. Doubt that the breaker is at fault, since its never tripped before...sounds to me like a wire come loose/broke at the motor...thats where I'd be heading
 
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