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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The Dewalt 735X for $600 from Amazon. My research so far has found nothing to compare to the Dewalt at this price.

Any tips on this Dewalt? Is there another planer I've not considered?

Thanks.
Steve
 

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David
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We upgraded from the 733 to the 735 a little over a year ago and it is a far better planer than the older models. I would still be using the 733, though, if it hadn't given up the ghost. I looked at full-size stand alone planer in the 15" size - Grizzly, PM, Delta, etc. - and just couldn't justify the extra $$$$ for just two more inches capacity. We don't have the floor space for an 18" or 20" so the next best thing was the 735 and that fits neatly under the tablesaw extension.

I've been planing Walnut a lot in the last week and have emptied the HF dust collector bag twice, so for a small two-car garage shop that's a lot of planing. The 735 just grins and says, 'More, give me more!' :grin:

David
 

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Theo
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Years ago a friend upgraded, and I got his old planer, for just the cost of shipping, around $50 if I recall right. And it still does its job just just fine. Doubt you'll find a deal like that one tho.
 

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The 735 has won every lunch box planer test since they came out with it. The 734 keeps coming in 2nd but there is a Rigid that ties it which might be the same tool in a different color.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I've looked at floor models like Jet, but I can't justify the price of those at this time for no clear advantage above what the Dewalt can do, particularly for the price.

Plus, this model seems to be used by hobbyists and pros alike with good results.

I wish I could find an 8" jointer this good and at this price point.
 

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The 735 is a terrific planer and I think you will like it. I have seen package deals for right at 600 that includes the stand and extra blades.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well, I just ordered it. Comes with the in-and-out-feed tables and another set of blades. Decided to order the stand for it as well.

Amazon says it will be here Thursday.

Since I'm still recovering from surgery I'll get a neighbor to help me get it on the stand. That will cost me though. Every time my neighbor helps me he charges me a bowl of homemade pinto beans and cornbread.

I'm happy to oblige.
 

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The big difference between that and a floor standing model is depth of cut. The King I have which is sold under many other names including I think Jet will take a 1/8" cut per pass. It's bigger and more robust with more power. Mine runs on 220. I've run 20' rough lumber through it and one of the reasons I wanted it is I have access to lots of rough lumber here which would wind up working a small planer too hard. I'd love to upgrade to a Byrd spiral segmented head but it's worth as much as the rest of the planer. It might still be an option for you but the reviews are pretty good with straight knives too. I get some pretty bad tearout with the white birch I run through mine.
 

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I am very pleased with my 735 and based on those results my neighbor invested in one as well. Same comments from his side. Excellent choice. I added a drawer into the stand as well.

The key will be dust collection. Don't try connecting it to a standard shop vac and if you use a cyclone chip collector make certain the lid is fastened tight.

Enjoy.
 

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For the money, you MIGHT and its a mighty big MIGHT, find a better unit for sale used somewhere. But my experience has been that they just come up very often at all. I look all the time at equipment.

I've had my 735 for 4 or 5 yrs now and I've never looked back or had a regret.
 
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The big difference between that and a floor standing model is depth of cut. The King I have which is sold under many other names including I think Jet will take a 1/8" cut per pass. It's bigger and more robust with more power. Mine runs on 220. I've run 20' rough lumber through it and one of the reasons I wanted it is I have access to lots of rough lumber here which would wind up working a small planer too hard. I'd love to upgrade to a Byrd spiral segmented head but it's worth as much as the rest of the planer. It might still be an option for you but the reviews are pretty good with straight knives too. I get some pretty bad tearout with the white birch I run through mine.
Chuck I had thought of getting a spiral head for the jointer and have to say I thought long and hard only to realize that that cut was far from the finished surface so why spend so much on a surface that will still be worked? If cost were no issue I'd say go for it but you will be sanding and for really figured grain you may also be hand planing which if done properly will leave you with the best surface. I guess it depends on how much time you have and how much work to do. But you'll also likely be sanding if not using a hand plane. At least that's the direction I'm headed at this point but that doesn't mean it's for everyone. I really just want my planner to dimension the thickness and be flat. If I run the board on the jointer first properly and get a flat surface then a 90 degree edge I'm golden. Plane to thickness and continue the project. A few passes with a well tuned jack or smoothing plane will leave surface that's velvety smooth and ready for a finish. At least that the theory I'm working with for now. I could be way off here of course as I haven't gotten the planes yet ready for work.
 

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All posts and comparisons I've seen have the 735 at the top of the list. I have several friends that use them and are very happy without having issues.
 

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The WEN 6552T 13 in. 15 Amp 3-Blade Benchtop so far has been a good machine. The cuts have been smooth. Glad I went with it and saved a bunch of money in the process.
 

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The key will be dust collection. Don't try connecting it to a standard shop vac and if you use a cyclone chip collector make certain the lid is fastened tight.

Enjoy.
And I'll add to that, Jon - turn your DC on first and then start the planer. If your hoses aren't fastened with clamps and your bag has any weak spots or leaking seams or loose lid then the blower on the 735 will knock the hoses off and show you any weak spots in your DC system... not in a good way! :wink:

David
 

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I wish I could find an 8" jointer this good and at this price point.
Hello Steve, I purchased the Cutech 8" jointer with carbide inserts several years ago and have jointed a couple hundred feet of maple, walnut and cherry and I'm totally satisfied with its performance. It doesn't have a long bed on it, but I haven't had any issues jointing 4' lengths and that's without using the bed extenders.

https://www.cutechtool.com/product-p/40180hc-ct.htm

PS: they now offer Teflon coated tables for an extra $20. If this option was available when I made my purchase, I probably would have gotten it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
And I'll add to that, Jon - turn your DC on first and then start the planer. If your hoses aren't fastened with clamps and your bag has any weak spots or leaking seams or loose lid then the blower on the 735 will knock the hoses off and show you any weak spots in your DC system... not in a good way! :wink:

David
I'm adding a 4"45-degree elbow off the planer port for two reasons.

1. to slightly slow down the velocity of the chips before adding the hose from the dc.
2. to angle the hose down and away from the outfeed table.

I'll use this cuff to attach to the planer port before adding the elbow. I can recommend these Powertech cuffs as very strong and secure.

Steve
 

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Chuck I had thought of getting a spiral head for the jointer and have to say I thought long and hard only to realize that that cut was far from the finished surface so why spend so much on a surface that will still be worked? If cost were no issue I'd say go for it but you will be sanding and for really figured grain you may also be hand planing which if done properly will leave you with the best surface. I guess it depends on how much time you have and how much work to do. But you'll also likely be sanding if not using a hand plane. At least that's the direction I'm headed at this point but that doesn't mean it's for everyone. I really just want my planner to dimension the thickness and be flat. If I run the board on the jointer first properly and get a flat surface then a 90 degree edge I'm golden. Plane to thickness and continue the project. A few passes with a well tuned jack or smoothing plane will leave surface that's velvety smooth and ready for a finish. At least that the theory I'm working with for now. I could be way off here of course as I haven't gotten the planes yet ready for work.
Steve the spiral cutters might still require sanding out imperfections but it's easier to sand those out than it is to sand tear out smooth. Any type cutter heads require some sanding anyway to get rid of chatter marks.
 

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I'm adding a 4"45-degree elbow off the planer port for two reasons.

1. to slightly slow down the velocity of the chips before adding the hose from the dc.
2. to angle the hose down and away from the outfeed table.

I'll use this cuff to attach to the planer port before adding the elbow. I can recommend these Powertech cuffs as very strong and secure.

Steve
Keep an eye on that for the first little while Steve. Sharp 90s can plug much more easily and those machines can pack the sawdust in pretty tight if they do get plugged. VOE there. I wound up removing the chute on my big planer.
 
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