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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been watching various videos on routing with templates and have noticed that some people route from right to left, others from left to right. Is this a matter of preference or is there more to it?

As always, thanks.

Lyman
 

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Hi Lyman,

This is generally accepted as th correct feed direction for hand held routers.
This prevents a climb cut and is much safer.
The direction is reversed when using a router table.

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks JW! Very much appreciate the illustration as well!

Best,

Lyman
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Left to Right of a fence, Left to right off a bearing, do test pieces as your will see straight away if your direction is right. N
Thanks Neville! Will try it.
Best,
Lyman
 

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Thanks Neville! Will try it.
Best,
Lyman
A router or trimmer with a bearing cutter will normally be on top of the work piece as will a router with an attached fence, so with these cuts its left to right along the work piece, a router table with a fixed fence is normally under the work piece, so that is upside down to the bearing cutter type cut, so with that the work piece will come into the cutter from the right to the left along the fence.

With both cuts the cutter is coming into the work piece from the same direction regarding the cutters angle of attack, into the cut, were it put in the other way the cutter can grab the workpiece and drag it in, you don't want that, still you will feel if the cutter is trying to grab it, if it does its cutting in the wrong direction. Still you should always have a scrap piece ready to test the cut, if you ask the cutter to cut too much in one pass it may burn or rip the workpiece, asking the cutter to cut a lot in one pass will aslo overheat the cutter too so dont overload the cut, so then its best to do a pre-cut run where the cutter takes away 50% to 60% in the first pass, then reset the set up to the finished cut and do a final pass, always have test pieces handy and don't use your true work piece/s until the test piece cut is what you want.

Use all care as cutters are fast and can have a finger off your hand faster than you can stop pushing. N
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
A router or trimmer with a bearing cutter will normally be on top of the work piece as will a router with an attached fence, so with these cuts its left to right along the work piece, a router table with a fixed fence is normally under the work piece, so that is upside down to the bearing cutter type cut, so with that the work piece will come into the cutter from the right to the left along the fence.

With both cuts the cutter is coming into the work piece from the same direction regarding the cutters angle of attack, into the cut, were it put in the other way the cutter can grab the workpiece and drag it in, you don't want that, still you will feel if the cutter is trying to grab it, if it does its cutting in the wrong direction. Still you should always have a scrap piece ready to test the cut, if you ask the cutter to cut too much in one pass it may burn or rip the workpiece, asking the cutter to cut a lot in one pass will aslo overheat the cutter too so dont overload the cut, so then its best to do a pre-cut run where the cutter takes away 50% to 60% in the first pass, then reset the set up to the finished cut and do a final pass, always have test pieces handy and don't use your true work piece/s until the test piece cut is what you want.

Use all care as cutters are fast and can have a finger off your hand faster than you can stop pushing. N
Excellent input Neville, thank you very much for taking the time to share all that advice. The more I learn the better off I am. Again, thank you.

Best,

Lyman
 
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Whenever in doubt, look at the cutter to see which way it rotates. You want the sharp edges of the cutter moving in the opposite direction of the wood being fed into it. Always feed the work into the bit in this direction if you will be removing any significant amount of material.

If you move the work in the same direction as the cutters on the router bit, this is "climb cutting" and the work will want to pull out of your hands violently, if trying to remove any significant amount of wood. Climb cutting helps though, if you want a smoother cut AFTER you have already made the cut in the correct direction and want to just remove the fuzz left by the first cut.

Always be prepared for the router or work piece trying to get away from you. Holding on tight is usually best, and follow the 6" rule about keeping fingers and body parts at least 6" away from that spiny sharp thing. If you find yourself getting closer, stop and find another way.

Charley
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks Charley, great info! Distance, yes. A good thing. Last Saturday ~1/4" of my left pinky and the knives on the Jointer got into a fight when edging a board. Knives won.

Best,

Lyman
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks Roxanne!
Best,
Lyman
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Absolutely. The answers have been great!
Best,
Lyman
 
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