Router Forums banner

1 - 20 of 40 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,625 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I watch these videos from time to time because it's fascinating what can be done with so little. Not the safest way to operate for sure...


...it's a bit long at 20 minutes but still fascinating...no screws (except in a few spots), tight-fitting complex joints, splicing, etc...

Enjoy...I do...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
204 Posts
Where there is a will there's a way. Lots of what I do outside of woodworking requires different tools in order to disassemble or assemble things. Sometimes McGyvering stuff is ok, other times it's stupid and or dangerous.

It is possible to dig a ditch with a spoon or cut a tree down with a knife, but.......

I for one like decent tools, but only when they function properly. Or make your own. Or go to Harbor Freight/Princess Auto/Rockler/Woodcraft, SnapOn truck,online etc.

All individual preference, mindset and situation IMHO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,625 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
seriously????

Yup...but it depends on the job...

When I work at other people's houses I don't bring my whole shop with me...

...circular saw replaces table saw and miter saw (yes...even for crown molding)
...even the circular saw can be replaced
...saw horses replaces bench
...rulers and tapes replace jigs
...1's and 2x's replace straight edges and templates
...small block place for corners
...chisels instead of mortise and tenon tools
etc...

That doesn't mean I'm throwing my arsenal out...but...more and more I think of alternative ways to cut and whirlie besides loading up the trailer...

Again, it depends on the job and certainly the shop makes it easy...but for off-site jobs I tend to travel lighter...maybe I'm starting to lean to hand vs power...

...just sayin'
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,238 Posts
"Need"...sorry, not familiar with the concept. ;)

OK: if we're talking about a brewski, well then...

I haven't watched the vid yet, but that opening shot grabbed my attention! Is he nutz???
That bugged me too. What's his hand doing right in front of that blade. Hit a knot or hidden nail and the saw jumps and slices off a finger or two.

And when it comes to tool, when does need out vote want. Yup, taking tools on the job is definitely time to travel light, but I don't get that far from electricity around here where I do all my carpentry projects. That's why I bought that 100 ft 12 gauge extension cable, and those battery operated tools.

Interesting video though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,459 Posts
"That bugged me too. What's his hand doing right in front of that blade. Hit a knot or hidden nail and the saw jumps and slices off a finger or two. "
-Tom
Exactly. No excuses; his other hand is on the trigger switch!
Not to mention crouching directly behind the saw...with open-toed sandals!!!
 

·
Registered
Theo
Joined
·
6,930 Posts
Might be wrong, but looks to me like his hand is behind the saw. Trigger? All the circular saws I've seen the trigger points toward the front of the saw. Guard always raises up in the rear. I'll have to watch the video.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,459 Posts
Might be wrong, but looks to me like his hand is behind the saw. Trigger? All the circular saws I've seen the trigger points toward the front of the saw. Guard always raises up in the rear. I'll have to watch the video.
Theo; in fact it's more dangerous behind the saw than in front of it. But yes behind it in the pic, hence my comment re standing behind the saw making the cut with his toes almost in the line of fire. :surprise:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,954 Posts
You guys are just spoiled, thats all.When I started we wedged up the guards on the saws, ran the saws with the blades all the way up or down, Leaned ladders against the wall without tieing them down, walked the top plates on the walls, walked the beams, no harnesses,safety belts,2-3 stories up, hung upside down with someone hanging onto our ankles. tied our pant legs around our boots to keep the mud out. Pack as many studs on your arm as the distance between your wrist and your elbow,(9 in my case) from the lumber pile to the house across a 2X12 plank.
We packed 4-12', 14', 3-16' 2x4 plate on our shoulders. Even had to pack 4X12 garage door header 18' long alone. 6 sheet of 3/8" sheathing, 2 sheets of 1 1/8"decking, 4 sheets of 1/2" plywood alone at a time.
We worked in the rain the snow, freezing, no hard hats or safety shoes, wore nail bags with all pouches full of nails,tools,plus a 32 0z. hammer. You didn't see any little ole ladies on the job then. At least we wore good strong boots that cost us over a days wages.
I can relate to that video, and I bet there are not many injuries there either. When you work like that every nerve in your body is alive because you know you can get hurt.
I would have like to seen the carving of the boards on the video.
They probably only get $1.25/day too.
Herb
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,419 Posts
You guys are just spoiled, thats all.When I started we wedged up the guards on the saws, ran the saws with the blades all the way up or down, Leaned ladders against the wall without tieing them down, walked the top plates on the walls, walked the beams, no harnesses,safety belts,2-3 stories up, hung upside down with someone hanging onto our ankles. tied our pant legs around our boots to keep the mud out. Pack as many studs on your arm as the distance between your wrist and your elbow,(9 in my case) from the lumber pile to the house across a 2X12 plank.
We packed 4-12', 14', 3-16' 2x4 plate on our shoulders. Even had to pack 4X12 garage door header 18' long alone. 6 sheet of 3/8" sheathing, 2 sheets of 1 1/8"decking, 4 sheets of 1/2" plywood alone at a time.
We worked in the rain the snow, freezing, no hard hats or safety shoes, wore nail bags with all pouches full of nails,tools,plus a 32 0z. hammer. You didn't see any little ole ladies on the job then. At least we wore good strong boots that cost us over a days wages.
I can relate to that video, and I bet there are not many injuries there either. When you work like that every nerve in your body is alive because you know you can get hurt.
I would have like to seen the carving of the boards on the video.
They probably only get $1.25/day too.
Herb
Herb today your job then is now a 2 man job, one to do the carpentry work and the other to drive he fork lift! :smile:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,264 Posts

·
Registered
Theo
Joined
·
6,930 Posts
Theo; in fact it's more dangerous behind the saw than in front of it. But yes behind it in the pic, hence my comment re standing behind the saw making the cut with his toes almost in the line of fire. :surprise:
I would much rather behind than in front.
 

·
Registered
Theo
Joined
·
6,930 Posts
I can relate to that video, and I bet there are not many injuries there either. When you work like that every nerve in your body is alive because you know you can get hurt.
I would have like to seen the carving of the boards on the video.
They probably only get $1.25/day too.
Herb
I never heard of any injuries that way in the times I was in that part of the world. Like I always say, you need to be a bit scared of the machines you work with, so then you are careful, not careless. I visited a furniture factory, all the carving was done by a crew about 10 or so to about 14. I'm thinking they get a bit more than that a day, skilled labor after all, but not going to get rich by our standards most likely.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,954 Posts
Herb today your job then is now a 2 man job, one to do the carpentry work and the other to drive he fork lift! :smile:
You are right,it was ladders leaning against the post or step ladder with a guy on each end and the beam on his shoulder, There were other helping hoist it onto your shoulder though. and 2 men loading the trusses, and one man tipping them up. There wasn't a boom or forklift on the job.
Everything was hand nailed,and even when pneumatic nailers and staplers showed up it took a couple of years before the Building Dept. accepted them. I remember having to go back and hand nail the outside sheathing and plywood deck because the inspector didn't accept air nailing.
Herb
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15,459 Posts
I would much rather behind than in front.
I'd be willing to bet that most circ. saw injuries, especially to the groin, inner thigh, and leg, are from saws binding and kicking back. In theory at least the soleplate should hit your hand before the blade can make contact, if your hand (or foot?) is in in front.
 
1 - 20 of 40 Posts
Top