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I'd be willing to bet that most circ. saw injuries, especially to the groin, inner thigh, and leg, are from saws binding and kicking back. In theory at least the soleplate should hit your hand before the blade can make contact, if your hand (or foot?) is in in front.
The right way to use a skilsaw is the keep the nosedown tight and apply pressue as you saw on the nose of the saw. This also applies to plunge cutting. The second you let the heel of the saw get more pressure than the nose,it will kick back,and you can't stop it.
Herb
 

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Discussion Starter #22
Absolutely...there are lots of hazards in the video...doing it all day every day they sure do cut straight and accurate....the joints especially, hand cut with a saw.

I started to think they wouldn't get any screws in their bare feet but then later in the video they do use screws for the table top.

Like Herb said...would have been nice to see all the carving...oh, well...

Maybe this thread should turn into "how many hazards can you count"...?
 

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Also In my mind, it was the highspeed saws that were the most dangerous, and the worm drives the safest. Because it was easier to keep the weight forward and the nose down. If you notice the persons using the hispeed saws have the heel lifted a tiny bit when sawing.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Also In my mind, it was the highspeed saws that were the most dangerous, and the worm drives the safest. Because it was easier to keep the weight forward and the nose down. If you notice the persons using the hispeed saws have the heel lifted a tiny bit when sawing.

Worm drives are my favorite (Mag77), especially for ripping long boards...
 

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I may have the record for the most unused tools . Bought a GI 15” planer, never hooked up. 15” GI disc sander station , never hooked up .
Incra router table , fences , lift etc . Never assembled.
Gripper , still in the box .
Bosch 1617 router , never plugged in . (Should test to see if it works )
I’m sure I’ll think of several more by tomorrow :|
 
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I'd be willing to bet that most circ. saw injuries, especially to the groin, inner thigh, and leg, are from saws binding and kicking back. In theory at least the soleplate should hit your hand before the blade can make contact, if your hand (or foot?) is in in front.
The only circular saw injury I have ever heard of was a friend of my old man. He took the guard off a circular saw, for some unknown reason, he never told. He cut something, then while the blade was still spinning, set the saw on his leg. Cut him down to the bone, and somehow he survived. If the guard had been left on, he would not even have gotten a nick.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
I may have the record for the most unused tools . Bought a GI 15” planer, never hooked up. 15” GI disc sander station , never hooked up .
Incra router table , fences , lift etc . Never assembled.
Gripper , still in the box .
Bosch 1617 router , never plugged in . (Should test to see if it works )
I’m sure I’ll think of several more by tomorrow :|

Ok, Rick...there is a positive side to your dilemma...you can do unboxing reviews for all that stuff...>:)
 

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@!Herb Stoops,
My father was a master builder and contractor. Sometimes in the afternoon, after school, I used to go out to his sites with him. The methods of working are as you described, except that there is no timber framing here - masonry and concrete, with wood trusses for pitched roofs of houses. When necessary, guys hoisted 50 kg bags of cement up ladders, for mixing a batch in a tight spot. His carpenters eschewed powered tools, other than for gang-cutting boards to length for scaffolding, trusses or making forms for reinforced concrete beams. I remember he bought a worm-drive Skilsaw - lasted forever, because so little used. Ditto with a Millers Falls D-handle high-torque drill - the guys preferred brace-and-bit. The power drill kept burning out, because it was used for the very purpose it was not designed to do - twisting galvanised wire into cables.
I was assiduously discouraged from having anything to do with that line of work - steered towards a profession. Consequently, when the old man and his crew retired, it did not even occur to me to get hold of the Stanley planes - when I eventually bought one (made in UK) some 35 yrs ago, it could easily have been made in China. For decades, I believed that I just did not have what it takes to use a hand plane.

Still, we stand on the shoulders of those who have gone before. I imagine the guys who built in Roman times would have scoffed at your boots, and those who built the pyramids would have scoffed at these new-fangled steel things.

 

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"That bugged me too. What's his hand doing right in front of that blade. Hit a knot or hidden nail and the saw jumps and slices off a finger or two. "
-Tom
Exactly. No excuses; his other hand is on the trigger switch!
Not to mention crouching directly behind the saw...with open-toed sandals!!!
look again..
his hand is behind the saw...
 
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Theo; in fact it's more dangerous behind the saw than in front of it. But yes behind it in the pic, hence my comment re standing behind the saw making the cut with his toes almost in the line of fire. :surprise:
two hands on the saw please...
 
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I'd be willing to bet that most circ. saw injuries, especially to the groin, inner thigh, and leg, are from saws binding and kicking back. In theory at least the soleplate should hit your hand before the blade can make contact, if your hand (or foot?) is in in front.
mostly from using body parts for sawhorses...
or poor maint...

.
 

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Absolutely...there are lots of hazards in the video...doing it all day every day they sure do cut straight and accurate....the joints especially, hand cut with a saw.

I started to think they wouldn't get any screws in their bare feet but then later in the video they do use screws for the table top.

Like Herb said...would have been nice to see all the carving...oh, well...

Maybe this thread should turn into "how many hazards can you count"...?
his planer and mortiser are definitely upscale...
took so much money to by them there wasn't anything left for hand tools...
 

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I'd be willing to bet that most circ. saw injuries, especially to the groin, inner thigh, and leg, are from saws binding and kicking back. In theory at least the soleplate should hit your hand before the blade can make contact, if your hand (or foot?) is in in front.
''other tools'' aren't w/o their issues...

.
 

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place this add...
it should get some results....

,
 

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Not sure how many tools I need, but it’s always more than I have :)
I've been adding tools myself, mostly cordless. Chisels, rubber mallet, spray bottle, and so on.
 
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