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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Im new here and to the world of routing so I need some help on this one. I searched and found some related 60 degree forum threads, but not exactly what I needed.

First off, is there any way I can get a 60 or at the least a 45 degree chamfer bit that is reversed or upside down oriented like a dovetail bit V instead of the most common chamfer ^ style?

I need this because my surface that needs to be scratch free would have to be laid down on the table with my normal chamfer 45 degree bit and I cant do that. I would be scratching the hell out of my delicate surface trying to bevel the edges. So I need the chamfer bit to be reversed like a dovetail bit. Does this exist? If not, do they have a 60 degree angle dovetail bit that could work and do pretty much the same beveling edge look?

So here's exactly what I need. Im cutting 1/8" plastic so my bit doesn't have to be extremely big. I would need it with a guide bearing and the shank is 1/4".

Any help you can give will be greatly appreciated.


p.s. I was at the store the other day and the guy said I can build my own bit piece by piece. Is this true and could I do this for a 60 degree with bearing chamfer bit? Price more expensive?

Thanks.
 

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Im new here and to the world of routing so I need some help on this one. I searched and found some related 60 degree forum threads, but not exactly what I needed.

First off, is there any way I can get a 60 or at the least a 45 degree chamfer bit that is reversed or upside down oriented like a dovetail bit V instead of the most common chamfer ^ style?

I need this because my surface that needs to be scratch free would have to be laid down on the table with my normal chamfer 45 degree bit and I cant do that. I would be scratching the hell out of my delicate surface trying to bevel the edges. So I need the chamfer bit to be reversed like a dovetail bit. Does this exist? If not, do they have a 60 degree angle dovetail bit that could work and do pretty much the same beveling edge look?

So here's exactly what I need. Im cutting 1/8" plastic so my bit doesn't have to be extremely big. I would need it with a guide bearing and the shank is 1/4".

Any help you can give will be greatly appreciated.


p.s. I was at the store the other day and the guy said I can build my own bit piece by piece. Is this true and could I do this for a 60 degree with bearing chamfer bit? Price more expensive?

Thanks.
Why not protect the face with plastic or even 1/4" MDF and route as you normally would. If this is clear plastic you could possible scratch the back side and see it through the front.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Why not protect the face with plastic or even 1/4" MDF and route as you normally would. If this is clear plastic you could possible scratch the back side and see it through the front.
That's a good idea. What would be the best plastic option for that? Something thin, sticks well, protects, and easily peals off. Are there thin sticker like protective sheets that I can buy?
 

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You could use a 60 degree with a bearind and use something to protect the surface. If the plastic came with a coating you could leave it on.
 

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I know absolutely nothing about your project, but the first thing that I noticed is that the difference between 60 deg. and 45 deg. across one-eighth of an inch is miniscule, but maybe this goes into a mitered joint, or something like that. 60 deg. is just 30 deg. flipped-over edgewise for SOME THINGS.

By the way, If I were doing this: I would cut two boards of sufficient dimension and at the required angle, and file or sand-off the edge. the amount you're removing is not much bigger than the finger of an ant. You would sandwich-clamp the two boards with the plastic positioned to only stick-out less than one-eighth of an inch! Then use the "sandwich as a "shooting board".

Good Luck, Be Safe and Have Fun Doing This!
 

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1 pc 1/2" Shank Crown Molding Angle 52°/38° Router Bit | eBay

http://www.sommerfeldtools.com/5-Pc-Chamfer-Set/productinfo/05001/
===


Im new here and to the world of routing so I need some help on this one. I searched and found some related 60 degree forum threads, but not exactly what I needed.

First off, is there any way I can get a 60 or at the least a 45 degree chamfer bit that is reversed or upside down oriented like a dovetail bit V instead of the most common chamfer ^ style?

I need this because my surface that needs to be scratch free would have to be laid down on the table with my normal chamfer 45 degree bit and I cant do that. I would be scratching the hell out of my delicate surface trying to bevel the edges. So I need the chamfer bit to be reversed like a dovetail bit. Does this exist? If not, do they have a 60 degree angle dovetail bit that could work and do pretty much the same beveling edge look?

So here's exactly what I need. Im cutting 1/8" plastic so my bit doesn't have to be extremely big. I would need it with a guide bearing and the shank is 1/4".

Any help you can give will be greatly appreciated.


p.s. I was at the store the other day and the guy said I can build my own bit piece by piece. Is this true and could I do this for a 60 degree with bearing chamfer bit? Price more expensive?

Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I know absolutely nothing about your project, but the first thing that I noticed is that the difference between 60 deg. and 45 deg. across one-eighth of an inch is miniscule, but maybe this goes into a mitered joint, or something like that. 60 deg. is just 30 deg. flipped-over edgewise for SOME THINGS.

By the way, If I were doing this: I would cut two boards of sufficient dimension and at the required angle, and file or sand-off the edge. the amount you're removing is not much bigger than the finger of an ant. You would sandwich-clamp the two boards with the plastic positioned to only stick-out less than one-eighth of an inch! Then use the "sandwich as a "shooting board".

Good Luck, Be Safe and Have Fun Doing This!
I am making guitar pickguards. This angle is crucial since its vintage spec accurate. The difference from a 45 to 60 on a pick guard is quite drastic. For the 45 degree you dont see much of a small outline of the material, but for a 60 degree you have a nice thicker line. This small difference goes a long way. Heres what Im doing.



It almost seems the smaller I go the more of a difference 60 degrees makes.

Anyone have any links to a plastic wrap or plastic film that would work?

What is this one being used?


 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Alright I got my answer. Its called a Amana Bevel Rail Cutter. I just bought one. These are the rarest bits and I picked one up at a steal for $35. Now I can see exactly what Im doing and keep the face and surface of my soft smooth plastic material nice and clean. I couldn't find these online or anywhere else in the world. Thank God the guy down the road actually had one. Wow, thats a blessing from the Lord. Here's what it looks like for that future someone coming along with my same question.


 

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You could buy a product that is used to protect floors during construction. It is a plastic that peels off. A cheaper way would be to packing tape, it's 1.88" wide and comes in 40 or 45foot rolls. Just tape the entire back the pull it off. It could be that regular plastic food wrap would work but you would have to try it because as you know sometimes it sticks and sometimes it doesn't but it always sticks to itself.
 

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Ok, time to show my age... go to any hardware store and buy some clear contact paper. Make your cuts and peel it off when you are done. You will most likely need something like Goo Gone to remove any adhesive residue. Easy enough?
 

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Would it be possible to use a router table and fence? You would need to make a zero clearance insert for the fence and then move the fence into the bit from the back side.
once it is properly adjusted you should be able to follow the curve accurately.
 

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You may not need it now, but this is for future reference. OfficeMax or OfficeDepot sell a roll of plastic lamination used in a manual lamination tool they also sell. The material has a sticky side and a smooth side. I have not used this for anything but laminating. I do not know if the sticky side would leave any residue after removal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
You may not need it now, but this is for future reference. OfficeMax or OfficeDepot sell a roll of plastic lamination used in a manual lamination tool they also sell. The material has a sticky side and a smooth side. I have not used this for anything but laminating. I do not know if the sticky side would leave any residue after removal.
Is it the thick stuff used for laminating paper and memos? If so that would be way to thick. If you have ever bought a new pickguard they always come with a very thin protective layer that easily peels off. This is exactly what I'm looking for.
 

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Alright I got my answer. Its called a Amana Bevel Rail Cutter. I just bought one. These are the rarest bits and I picked one up at a steal for $35. Now I can see exactly what Im doing and keep the face and surface of my soft smooth plastic material nice and clean. I couldn't find these online or anywhere else in the world. Thank God the guy down the road actually had one. Wow, thats a blessing from the Lord. Here's what it looks like for that future someone coming along with my same question.


You could have got it for $26 and free shipping. Now that's a steal. ;<)
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Ah that's alright. I'm happy with it, plus having in hand right away was worth it. I guess these aren't the rarest bits, I just didn't know what they called them. An invested 60 degree chamfer bit is very rare and that's what I thought it was when I bought it. It pretty much is, just with a different name. It's good to know they are still out there though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Ah that's alright. I'm happy with it, plus having in hand right away was worth it. I guess these aren't the rarest bits, I just didn't know what they called them. An invested 60 degree chamfer bit is very rare and that's what I thought it was when I bought it. It pretty much is, just with a different name. It's good to know they are still out there though.
"Inverted 60 degree"* sorry phone auto correct.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Hey guys, its been a long time since we last talked about this, but I need your help again. So last time I needed the blade part to be inverted and sticking out and above the router table, but now I need a bit that has a 60 degree edge with bearing that sits down into the router table and here is the hard part... I need it to be no more than 1 1/4" wide to fit into my table hole. I can't keep switching out the table insert so I just need to find this bit.

I found this bit here that would work perfectly, but the bearing doesn't extend all the way out to the blade since its made to have the top and bottom lip. I even thought about getting a wider bearing for this bit, but its more than the standard 1/2" bearing size.


Any suggestions? Shank size is not a major deal, but I would prefer 1/4", but will take a 1/2" to get this bit and save my fingers.
 
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