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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am building a workbench where I will be using a solid core door as the top. I have two operations that I need to accomplish: 1) squaring the edges - removing a chamfer and 2) placing a rabbet to receive an edging piece.

Door is 1 3/4" thick, with about a 1/16" chamfer. Surface veneer is birch. I plan on edging it with maple. I need to clean up the edges so there is a sharp, square corner for a clean joint with the edging. I want to put in a rabbet along the edge for what I'll call a tongue in groove joint for the edging.

I am thinking the edge squaring might be doable in a two-stage operation. First would be with a bearing guided bit with a bearing that is slightly smaller in diameter than the router cutter diameter reaching to about the centerline. Second stage would be to put the full diameter bearing on the bit and run it along the opposite side to bring it to flush with the first edge side. I have two bearing guided bits that could be used, 7/8x1-1/2" (1/2" shank) and 1/2x1" (1/4" shank). I do not know the bearing IDs, but I believe that can be dealt with. Both are used, not perfectly sharp, with the larger one being more dull.

For the rabbet, I have a slot cutting router bit that I think can be used (Infinity Tools 00-236). It has multiple cutters, like a dado set. My only concern is how long the 1/2" shaft is and the amount of extension beyond the collet that might be needed. Shaft is 1 1/2" long. I can see doing this in two stages also, reaching in from each side, using a less wide cutter stack to reduce the latteral pressure. Included bearings allow for a minimum of 1/4" deep cut, but I think using an edge guide or template guide, I might be able to reduce that cut depth to 1/8" and make two passes.

I am interested in your thoughts on the above and ideas on alternative approaches.

Thanks,

Rick
 

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I'd probably just clamp a straight edge on the door and use a straight bit. As for a dull bit you can touch them up with a diamond hone. They won't be good as new but will show an improvement. I use the ones that are about 2" x 6" and come 3 to a set. I prefer to lay the hone on the edge of the bench and stroke the bit back and forth a few times. You want to use the fine hone (600 grit equivalent) to do it. Another option are the small 1" x about 3" little diamond paddles. They are often sold in outdoor sports stores. Bow hunters use them to sharpen broadheads and fishermen use them to sharpen hooks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ah, yes. Forgot about the straight edge and straight bit.

I have a 6 ft long 2" wide extruded aluminum angle that is part of my bamboo rod making mill, that I have removed and am using as a straight edge. Bit of a pain the clamp to the edge, perhaps, as it will need to go underneath, but doable. I could use the edge guide to position the router, from the top surface. I think I'd rather place the door on edge for the long sides, but with the door at 80" long, I'd have to lay if flat for the narrow edges.

I'll give that setup a dry run trial.

Thanks,

Rick
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Forgot to ask, are you honing the OD of the flutes or the vertical faces? I am having trouble picturing the setup you mention.

Rick
 

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I am building a workbench where I will be using a solid core door as the top. I have two operations that I need to accomplish: 1) squaring the edges - removing a chamfer and 2) placing a rabbet to receive an edging piece.

Door is 1 3/4" thick, with about a 1/16" chamfer. Surface veneer is birch. I plan on edging it with maple. I need to clean up the edges so there is a sharp, square corner for a clean joint with the edging. I want to put in a rabbet along the edge for what I'll call a tongue in groove joint for the edging.

I am thinking the edge squaring might be doable in a two-stage operation. First would be with a bearing guided bit with a bearing that is slightly smaller in diameter than the router cutter diameter reaching to about the centerline. Second stage would be to put the full diameter bearing on the bit and run it along the opposite side to bring it to flush with the first edge side. I have two bearing guided bits that could be used, 7/8x1-1/2" (1/2" shank) and 1/2x1" (1/4" shank). I do not know the bearing IDs, but I believe that can be dealt with. Both are used, not perfectly sharp, with the larger one being more dull.

For the rabbet, I have a slot cutting router bit that I think can be used (Infinity Tools 00-236). It has multiple cutters, like a dado set. My only concern is how long the 1/2" shaft is and the amount of extension beyond the collet that might be needed. Shaft is 1 1/2" long. I can see doing this in two stages also, reaching in from each side, using a less wide cutter stack to reduce the latteral pressure. Included bearings allow for a minimum of 1/4" deep cut, but I think using an edge guide or template guide, I might be able to reduce that cut depth to 1/8" and make two passes.

I am interested in your thoughts on the above and ideas on alternative approaches.

Thanks,

Rick
for squaring...
use your router as a joiner...
see the PDF...

for the rabbet..

since we don't know what size rabbet you want...
a rabbeting bit may take care of it...

if you need a larger rabbet than those bits can give you go w/ a straight bit or a mortising bit instead... a spiral bit would be over kill...
a clamp on straight guide is just the ticket for those two bits...
unless you already have an edge guide for your router...

are you trying to full edge band or make a rabbet and fill w/ your maple???
have you considered a T or splined edge molding??

I'm not clear on the slot cutter limitations you speak of...

.
 

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Forgot to ask, are you honing the OD of the flutes or the vertical faces? I am having trouble picturing the setup you mention.

Rick
vertical back edge..

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Rick, are you suggesting you want to install the edge as an inverted 'L' shape? Seems like a lot of extra trouble for what is potentially a fragile joint solution.
How thick is the edging? 3/4" ? If you're using hardwood, maybe just glue it up. then drill and dowel along the length? Or drill, screw, and plug the holes with dowel.
Once again the subject of glue strength lurks unsaid in the background... ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
for squaring...
use your router as a joiner...
see the PDF...
I am, for a straight edged piece of wood. The angle iron thing didn't turn out to be as much of a right angle as I wanted.

Something just occurred to me. When speaking of a straight edge, were some meaning clamp the straight edge to the base of the router and use it to guide the router? I am thinking of clamping, now, a straight, square-edged board on the underside of the door, as additional support for the base of the router. I would be using an edge guide to set the distance of the cut and guiding along the upper side of the door surface. This is all with the door laying flat on a table or its leg base, as in the photo below.

for the rabbet..
since we don't know what size rabbet you want...
a rabbeting bit may take care of it...
Didn't say perhaps, but 1/2" wide is what I am thinking.

if you need a larger rabbet than those bits can give you go w/ a straight bit or a mortising bit instead... a spiral bit would be over kill...
a clamp on straight guide is just the ticket for those two bits...
unless you already have an edge guide for your router...
I have an edge guide. You saying the edge guide alone would be enough. I was trying to give the router base more support with the straight edge (not use it to guide the router),

Money is tight these days, so I would like to use bits that I have, rather than spend money I don't have on new ones.

are you trying to full edge band or make a rabbet and fill w/ your maple???
Not sure as it sounds like both, sort of. Rabbet in the middle of the edge of the door and fill with the maple strip, but the maple strip would be full width of the door edge with the part that would fill the rabbet as the long edge of a "T", like the far left in your image.

have you considered a T or splined edge molding??
Not sure what these mean. If you mean a T slot like on a table saw that keeps the miter gauge down on the table, no, not that sort.

Rick
 

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Nice looking bench, Rick. May I gently mention that those castors are a serious tripping hazard(?)...
If the wheels are universal swivels, rotate the brackets 90 deg to the sides of the posts.
Why didn't you mount castors on the bottoms of the posts?
 

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I am, for a straight edged piece of wood. The angle iron thing didn't turn out to be as much of a right angle as I wanted.

1... Something just occurred to me. When speaking of a straight edge, were some meaning clamp the straight edge to the base of the router and use it to guide the router? I am thinking of clamping, now, a straight, square-edged board on the underside of the door, as additional support for the base of the router. I would be using an edge guide to set the distance of the cut and guiding along the upper side of the door surface. This is all with the door laying flat on a table or its leg base, as in the photo below.

2... Didn't say perhaps, but 1/2" wide is what I am thinking.

3... I have an edge guide. You saying the edge guide alone would be enough. I was trying to give the router base more support with the straight edge (not use it to guide the router),

4... Money is tight these days, so I would like to use bits that I have, rather than spend money I don't have on new ones.

5... Not sure as it sounds like both, sort of. Rabbet in the middle of the edge of the door and fill with the maple strip, but the maple strip would be full width of the door edge with the part that would fill the rabbet as the long edge of a "T", like the far left in your image.

6... Not sure what these mean. If you mean a T slot like on a table saw that keeps the miter gauge down on the table, no, not that sort.

Rick
1... a straight edge clamps to the door...
an edge guide mounts on the router...

2... wide = along the edge (end to end)..
width = width of slot top to bottom..
depth = how deep you cut the slot...

3... yes... the straight edge is to guide the router...
that angle piece will work if it's straight...
these are straight edge guides...
watch the 1st minute or so to help you apply your piece of angle...

4... what bits do you have on hand??? Straight??? Slot cutter??? Rabbet???

5... you are not cutting a rabbet.. you are cutting a slot...
you will be installing a T edge banding/molding...
refer to the pic in post #9...
the far left banding is a T molding... I trust you are looking to cut the slot for it...



6... that's a miter slot.. different animal..
that type of T is cut w/ a T slot bit...




this pic shows a rabbet cut and others.. (see pic)

.
 

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Stick...doesn't sound like he means a rabbet...I think he's routing a groove down the center of the edge of the door...

Then a T-shaped piece of maple to fit into it as edging...

A slot cutter could do the trick...
 
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Stick...doesn't sound like he means a rabbet...I think he's routing a groove down the center of the edge of the door...

Then a T-shaped piece of maple to fit into it as edging...

A slot cutter could do the trick...
isn't that what I said???
am I speaking an obscure language???
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Nice looking bench, Rick. May I gently mention that those castors are a serious tripping hazard(?)...
If the wheels are universal swivels, rotate the brackets 90 deg to the sides of the posts.
Why didn't you mount castors on the bottoms of the posts?
I hadn't considered them as tripping hazards, but they are. Perhaps I had not because the casters are not meant to remain in place as pictured. They are removable and that is my plan. I don't anticipate moving the bench much once it is finished an in use. See photo below. There are other things in my shop where I might use these casters more and where they might remain. But, I would use the same quick-release mounting plates.

There are leveling feet on the bottoms of the posts (6), so that I can level the support frame to minimize distorting the table top and provide good support throughout the bench. Second photo below.


Rick
 

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Forgot to ask, are you honing the OD of the flutes or the vertical faces? I am having trouble picturing the setup you mention.

Rick
Just the face. The trick is to keep the bit flat on the hone which is why I find it easier to lay the hone on a bench and try to hold the bit face flat on it.
 

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I hadn't considered them as tripping hazards, but they are. Perhaps I had not because the casters are not meant to remain in place as pictured. They are removable and that is my plan. I don't anticipate moving the bench much once it is finished an in use. See photo below. There are other things in my shop where I might use these casters more and where they might remain. But, I would use the same quick-release mounting plates.

There are leveling feet on the bottoms of the posts (6), so that I can level the support frame to minimize distorting the table top and provide good support throughout the bench. Second photo below.


Rick
Ha! So you're not just a pretty face... Lol
Great plan, Rick!
 

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isn't that what I said???
am I speaking an obscure language???

H92n8wn 5y3 58m3 r94 qoo t99en m3n t9 c9n3e ti tghe q8e 9r ty483 d97nt46...
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
1... a straight edge clamps to the door...
an edge guide mounts on the router...
Yes, that is the way I am thinking of them.

4... what bits do you have on hand??? Straight??? Slot cutter??? Rabbet???
Freud 23-140 1/2" dia, 2 flute, 1" flute length, 1/2" dia. shank.

Amana 47130 3/4" dia., 2 flute, 1-1/2" flute length, bearing guided, 1/2" shank (this is the "duller" one).

Infinity Tools Slot Cutter Set (pictured in my initial post above).

5... you are not cutting a rabbet.. you are cutting a slot...
you will be installing a T edge banding/molding...
refer to the pic in post #9...
Post #9 is from DaninVan and does not have any photos. Do you mean your post, #5?

The image I attached below is a clip from your image, which is what I want to do.

the far left banding is a T molding... I trust you are looking to cut the slot for it...

Yes, this is what I want to do, T edge banding molding, all the way around all four edges of the door. The set I have (the Infinity one above), that is like a dado stack, has cutters that can be stacked to get most any desired slot width. Shallowest depth is 1/4" with the largest guide bearing, which is fine with me. I would set it up to cut a 1/2" wide slot unless there are reasons to use a different width.

Rick
 

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H92n8wn 5y3 58m3 r94 qoo t99en m3n t9 c9n3e ti tghe q8e 9r ty483 d97nt46...
I will not...
can I say ''Bite Me'' on this forum??

and I said language...
not dialect...
 

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@RickKr...

I meant post #10...

use your Infinity to cut the slot...
Stack the cutters to your happiness and let the bearing be your guide...
change the bearing for depth of cut control...

sure glad we sent the rabbet to the dinner table...
https://www.routerforums.com/2106465-post23.html
 

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Aren't those type of casters meant to go on the sides of the bench length so that they are covered up more by the overhang on the sides?
 
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