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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am having trouble cutting a double bead on the edge of a drawer divider with a single bead cutter. The first cut is fine but when I try the other edge the bead is slightly smaller and the end of the bead got gouged. I am using a 1/8 inch radius bit in a router table with a fence. It seems like the edge width after cutting the first bead is no longer uniform and the edge does not register correctly against the fence. Is this something that cant be accurately done with a single cutter bit or is something wrong with my technique?

Woody Dixon
 

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Hello N/A and welcome to the forums...
We're happy you found us...

how about some clarification...
is this where you are trying to go???


or is it this???


or perhaps this???


or even this???


and this style...
 

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@stick, Woody said he is using a single bead cutter so it may be the method he's using,such as running the beads to close together. The first example in your post should fit the bill.Jamesjj777746.
 

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@stick, Woody said he is using a single bead cutter so it may be the method he's using,such as running the beads to close together. The first example in your post should fit the bill.Jamesjj777746.
if we knew which bit he was using and what he wants for s finial would be a big help..
 

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Welcome to the forum Woody. Are you in the US? Please consider adding your name and location to your profile as it can make a difference in answers to your questions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I sent an earlier reply but I dont see it as posted. The bit that i am using is an amana beading bit with a 1/8 inch radius. I tried to post a url for it but I can't because I haven't posted 10 messages yet. The profile I am trying to achieve is close to image 1 above of the double bead except the beads are all the way to the edge. I tried again today with the same result. The first bead is fine but when I flip the wood to cut the bead on the opposite edge it doesn't seem to register correctly on the fence. The 2nd bead is smaller than the first and is lower so that edge is no longer straight. At the end of the cut the wood dips into the bit causing a 1/2 inch gauge. I've read about people cutting a double bead with a single bead cutter and there is no mention of any particular problem. Maybe this can't be done this way. A double bead cutter wouldn't work on 1/2 inch wood because the spacing and middle flat aren't correct, i.e., the beads don't line up on the ends and the flat between them is too narrow.

Woody
 

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You can just post the bit's part number Woody and one of us can post the image. The reason it's dipping at the end may be because the fences aren't lined up with each other. It can also be because you have too large a gap between them and the pressure you are putting on it is causing it to dip in. Another problem if the piece is riding against the fence on the beads is that when the trailing edge passes the first fence the piece is dipping because the bead is narrower than the face of the uncut board. Without more info that would be my best guess. It's not easy to set up any round profile bit so that it only cuts just to the face of your board and not deeper without leaving a small flat on the top of the bead. I've found that the best tool to set the fence with when using bits like that or a bull nose is to use a round dowel of close to the same diameter.

If that last possibility is the issue then one solution is to attach another board on top of the one you're beading. The top one will stay registered against the fence and prevent the bottom one from dipping. You can attach it with double sided carpet tape or a few drops of hot melt glue. My preference would be the hot melt. It's easy to clean up after with a sharp chisel or utility knife. It's also cheaper in the long run.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I think you are correct and I need to attach a board on top. I assume this would be the same width as the original board before the first bead, is that right? By the way the amana bit was 51540. I'll try this and post the results.


Woody
 

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set your fenc to flush face and the bit clearance to about zero..
this your bit???

.
 

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I think you are correct and I need to attach a board on top. I assume this would be the same width as the original board before the first bead, is that right? By the way the amana bit was 51540. I'll try this and post the results.


Woody
No. It just needs to be flush to the edge of the face you are routing before you start. One thing I would stay aware of is where your fingers are should the two boards separate during routing. Several things can play into that possibility such as putting so much pressure on one board that you stress the connection between them. Using a push block on the end of the stack probably isn't a bad idea too. Just keep in mind that you need to be aware of what's going on and imagine the various possibilities of what can happen. That isn't meant to scare you and hopefully it didn't.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Charles nailed this one. I tried his suggestion and both beads were the same size and no gouging at the end. What I was feeling was the top with the first bead was no longer full width after shaping and it was difficult to align the edge to the fence since the top and botttom were different widths. When the board cleared the infeed side there was not enough support above the cut to keep it from gouging. When I said the board should be the same width that was how I was insuring it lined up with the bottom uncut edge. Seems like it might even be safer if it wasnt the same width since if there was a problem delaminating my fingers would be nowwhere near that board.

Unfortunately when I was making the test cut today another old problem resurfaced. I have an elu 3339(essentially a dewalt 625) which is probably 30 yr old. The first cut I made created almost no bead because the bit height dropped. This has happened off and on for years and can be aggravating. Do I buy another collet to rule out that? In the past I assumed it was the screw mechanism(i have an aftermarket threaded rod also)that was somehow dropping. I dont see any adjustment to make on this. In the past I read that the lever could create a dimple which over time could cause this problem. I took the latch apart and I believe rotated it off a wear mark but never noticed much difference. It is an intermittent problem. Is there a reasonable fix for this or considering the age of the router should I start looking to just replace it? I have a dewalt 621 which would fit my incra plate(not a lift) but have not used it in a table. I know some have said both that and the 625 are not especially good for use in tables. If I bought a different route I would need to get a new plate and I would like to avoid that since I just got the plate.

Thanks to everyone for the suggestions which have been very helpful.

Woody
 

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Welcome to the forum Woody.
 

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Woody if the collet wasn't holding the bit tight enough then there should be wear marks on the shaft of the bit. Collets do wear out and hopefully they are still available for that model.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
There didnt appear to be wear marks the last time this happened. Thats why I suspect the problem is the lock lever. The collets I think are the same used by the dewalt 625 which is a clone of the elu. Do you know if the lock lever itself can be repaired ?


Woody
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Anybody have any ideas about repairing or adjusting the lock lever? I'm convinced that is the problem, not a defective collet. Seems like a waste to ditch the router for this but this intermittent dropping can ruin the piece if you are shaping using your final dimension.


Woody
 

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All of the plunge routers I've seen parts diagrams for have a small brass plug that goes between the end of the lock lever screw tip and the column. I think there may be a couple of reasons for this plug. One is that it is soft enough that it won't scratch up the steel column. Plus I think that it being softer may give it a better grip against the steel tube. Maybe the plug is worn or possibly the screw can be tightened. Or maybe you could put a very thin spacer between it and the screw. I found out about the plug by accident when I accidentally unscrewed the depth rod too far on one of mine and the base popped off. If the lock lever side is up then the plug falls out.

BTW, have you put anything on the columns to make them more slippery? And to make sure the bits aren't slipping once you tighten them in take a fine tipped magic marker and make a ring around the bit shank as tight to the collet as you can. If the bit slips that will make it obvious.
 
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Woody, quite some time ago I ran into the same problem as yours while trying to make round dowels with a half round cutter larger than yours The first cut was fine but the second cut was too deep making the dowel oval shaped rather than round. To solve the problem I made my pieces about 3" longer on both ends to give the piece about 3" to guide against the fence. I would start the cut 3" From the end and stop 3" from the other end. Then chop the ends off after done. It seemed to solve the problem too.
Herb
 
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